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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Introduce myself with reference to caregiver

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I have always required that the caregivers which I hire be bonded.

They should be professional and understand the Do's and Don'ts.  Accepting things from someone who has no decision making capabilities is not the correct course of action and could lead to legal action depending upon the situation.

 

However, if those to whom I am acting for have decision making capacity - their wish is what I will do and if the item is of value, it is cleared by the Trustee for whom I work.  

 

Some of these folks even legally change their Will to accommodate a special caregiver to whom they have a long and/or rewarding relationship.  I can understand that since some folks don't really have any immediate family ties and it is their stuff.

 

I have known them to give away their cars after many years of service being driven hither and yon by the caregiver.  My late Aunt was one such person.

 

Guess it just depends on the situation.

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Introduce myself with reference to caregiver

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I just wanted to share with everyone that as being your personal caregiver to my beloved cousin who has now passed the one thing that is very important to make sure that everybody is on the same page. I had to write posters out, I had to make sure that everyone understood I needed to know what was going on see as I did have to hire some caregivers. It was the hardest job I've ever had that is the biggest honor I could ever have.

 

Also if you have to hire outside caregivers you need to explain to them because for some reason some of the caregiver tied out with didn't get it if the patient tries to give you something that is an item in their house, money, etc.

whatever it is you make sure that the family knows or the person that's taking care of them knows that hey so instead of try to give me their ring and I know that most likely they're just not thinking correctly.

 

You would think most people what understand that this is something that Common Sense would prevail but unfortunately it did not in my case.

 

If I can help in any way the one thing I would tell you is if you have outside caregivers you make sure they understand no item is to be taken out of that house without the family or caregiver which means personal caregiver approval.

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