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Re: Want To Age Better? Get Cycling!

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So how much moving is enough?  The right answer is going to be individual, according to your current health and mobility level.

 

Here's what I did for exercise last week (Please note: It was Easter week, and we had a number of celebrations and special events in our schedule. Since I'm a competitive cyclist, my cycling miles will increase as days lengthen and races draw near.)

 

I walked 12 miles (besides all the running around I do each day).

I cycled 120 miles. (I ride/race recumbent trikes.)

I worked out in my home gym for 100 minutes. (A mixture of weight training, floor exercises and mini-trampoline routines.)

 

This is almost enough exercise for me (I want to do more targeted reps in the gym). My fitness goal right now is to build muscle but not to lose any weight. I'm in my late 50s and have zero health issues and zero prescriptions. Your exercise regimen should be tailored to your capabilities and goals.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Want To Age Better? Get Cycling!

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senior cyclists.jpgSenior Cyclists Have Stronger Immune Systems

From Gizmodo:

"Immortality may be a gift reserved only for the mole rats of the world. But staying highly active into your golden years might just offer the next best thing: a robust immune system that looks decades younger than expected. That’s the finding of a new study published Thursday in the journal Aging Cell."

 

And:

 

"The findings suggests that the gradual decline of our immune system as we age, also known as immunesenescence, might be not so inevitable. “We conclude that many features of immunesenescence may be driven by reduced physical activity with age,” the authors wrote.

 

Of course, the study isn’t the first to show clear differences between active people and everyone else. Other research has long found that a sedentary lifestyle can increase the risk of a variety of chronic conditions like cardiovascular disease, obesity, and certain cancers, especially the older you get. But this new research does further highlight the role of a robust immune system in keeping older people healthier."

 

Also:

senior triker.pngTrikes Are Popular With Senior Cyclists

 

"Not everything was the same between the youngsters and the aspiring Jack Lalannes though. The cyclists did have higher levels of memory T cells. And the levels of a certain population of immune cells, known as CD28−ve, CD57+ve T cells, were the same between the active and non-active elderly. The presence of both of these kinds of T cells are thought to increase the more foreign invaders we’re exposed to over a lifetime, the researchers say. That suggests that even the most active people will show some signs of wear and tear as they age."

 

Source: https://gizmodo.com/a-lifetime-of-cycling-keeps-the-immune-system-young-st-1823650049

 

Dr Mirkin's take:

 

Cyclists Age Better

Two exciting new studies show that older men and women who have cycled for many years do not have the markers of aging found in non-exercising people (Aging Cell, March 8, 2018). Their muscle size and strength, amount of body fat, levels of hormones such as testosterone, and blood cholesterol levels were close to those of much younger people. Their maximal ability to take in and use oxygen was more like that of people in their twenties than in non-exercisers of their own age group. Incredibly, the cyclists' immunity did not show the deterioration that is expected with aging. These studies focused on cyclists, but similar results would probably be found with other types of sustained exercise.

 

And:

 

"Amazing Benefits in Immunity
With aging, the thymus gland in the front of your upper chest shrinks and progressively loses some of its ability to make T-cells that help to protect you from developing cancers and infections. The most surprising news from this study is that the thymus glands of the older cyclists produced as many T-cells as those of the young people.

 

T-cells recognize foreign proteins on the surface of invading germs and cancers to tell your immunity to attack and kill these cells. They then stimulate your immune system to make antibodies to attach to and kill invading germs and cancer cells, and produce chemicals called cytokines that activate other T-cells to remove germs and cancer cells from your body. Other regulatory T-cells dampen down your immunity so that your immunity does not attack and destroy your own healthy cells.

 

trio of uprights.jpgCycling With Friends Makes Fitness Fun

 

Larger and Stronger Muscles and Better Use of Oxygen
The authors took muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle in the front of the cyclists' upper legs, the muscles strengthened most by cycling. The cyclists' muscles did not show the expected signs of aging:
• drop in muscle size,
• drop in mitochondrial protein content, and
• decrease in ability to take in and use oxygen.
Their muscles did show a decrease in capillary blood vessel density. The cyclists' maximal ability to take in and use oxygen, move air in their lungs, and develop muscle power (wattage) were like those of the much younger people."

 

Plus:

 

"Exercise Helps You to Live Longer, Even If You Already Have Heart Disease
Another new study reviewed 30 years of records of 3,307 adults who had had heart attacks or angina (pain from blocked arteries leading to the heart). Those who exercised at least a little bit were 36 percent less likely to die during the study period (J of the Am Coll of Card, March 2018;71(1)). Weight loss without exercising did not reduce their death rate. This study agrees with another study of more than 15,000 heart disease patients that also showed that exercise helps to prevent death in people who have already had heart attacks (J of the Am Coll of Card, October 2017;70(14Smiley Happy. Moderate activities can include walking, gardening, ballroom dancing, water aerobics or casual cycling. Vigorous exercise includes cycling faster than 10 miles an hour, jogging or lap swimming, according to the American Heart Association."

 

Source: http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/cyclists-age-better.html

 

Study after study concludes that if we are to live healthier, longer, more happy and productive lives, we need to get moving and keep moving. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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