Your pain isn't like anyone else's, and science is homing in on better treatments. Read about the newest ways to break pain's grip.

Reply
Valued Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1335
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,335 Views
Message 1 of 8

@nyadrnwrote:

Walk for two minutes. Repeat 15 times. Or walk for 10 minutes, thrice. The benefits for longevity appear to be almost exactly the same, according to an inspiring new study of physical activity patterns and life spans.

It finds that exercise does not have to be prolonged in order to be beneficial. It just has to be frequent.

Most of us who are interested in health know that federal exercise guidelines recommend we work out moderately for at least 30 minutes per day at least five times per week in order to reduce our risks of developing many diseases or dying prematurely.

These guidelines also recommend that we accumulate those 30 minutes of daily exercise in bouts lasting for at least 10 minutes at a time.

The guidelines, first published in 2008, were based on the best exercise science available at the time, including several studies indicating that if exercise sessions were briefer than 10 minutes, they would not increase people’s aerobic fitness, meaning their athletic endurance.

 

But improving endurance is not the same thing as improving health.

So when scientists and governmental regulators recently began planning a major update to the 2008 exercise guidelines, they decided, as part of their research, to gather the latest studies about exercise bouts and how long workouts should last in order to benefit health.

Somewhat to their surprise, they found only a few relevant, large-scale, recent studies, and most of these relied on people’s notoriously unreliable memories of how active they had been.

So, some of the scientists working on the new exercise guidelines decided that they would need to mount a major new study themselves.

They began by looking for reliable and objective data about ordinary people’s exercise habits.

 https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/well/move/walking-exercise-minutes-death-longevity.html?&moduleDe...


As we grow older seniors, like me, discover that long periods of vigorous exercise becomes more challenging. What with chronic health conditions and the effects ageing and nature has on our muscles and joints makes it difficult to exercise like we did years ago.

 

So I like the idea of breaking down physical exercising into 10 and 15 minute routines as many times a day or in a week that one feels safe doing them. This might also prevent any negative effects that some have when they exercise.

 

We know from a life time of experience just keeping active anyway you can improves both our mental and physical health.

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1335
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1375
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,375 Views
Message 2 of 8

@nyadrnwrote:

@Epsterwrote:

 

I say: exercise (a lot) now in order to avoid getting heart disease (and other lifestyle diseases). Smiley Happy

 


>>

I saw that but that is a different topic.  This topic is 2 minute walk breaks not cycling.  

 

 


@nyadrn  My bad for not quoting the section of your post to which I was replying. Sorry for the confusion.

 

I posted that study in reply to this: "I was pleased to read this article..  too many of them imho imply that if you are not going to go for the big time, ie the high milage (sic) workouts, you might as well sit in a chair and the studies just do not support that. "

 

Studies are always all over the place. That's the nature of the beast. Today coffee is reportedly healthy, but California is slapping a toxic chemical warning on it, and so on. So I mentioned in my post that not only do I read study after study that basically says move it --a lot-- or lose it, I also see that truth in my life. The people who carry a lot of extra weight around their stomachs, and who do a few minutes of mild exercise a day are also the ones with a short life expectancy. Meanwhile, the ones busting their butts to maintain excellent fitness are the more engaged, happier, livelier, more interesting and healthier set.

 

As for me, I'm 59, and just went through a battery of tests to reveal that my conditioning is that of a 20-something. And ya know what? I work longer, harder hours than the 20-somethings in my life. So I think me and my senior athlete friends are living proof of the common study findings that working out to raise a sweat is where you'll find your best health.

 

And we are the ones who can --and do-- walk fast for hours.

 

Maybe it comes down to your vision of great health. Walk a few minutes a day and maybe you'll extend your life: but will that life include a lot of health issues? Probably. Take off the extra weight, build muscle and eat right and you stand to not only extend your life, but improve the quality of said life. 

 

Best health to you!

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1375
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1417
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,417 Views
Message 3 of 8

@Epsterwrote:

 

I say: exercise (a lot) now in order to avoid getting heart disease (and other life style diseases). Smiley Happy

 


>>

I saw that but that is a different topic.  This topic is 2 minute walk breaks not cycling.  

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1417
Views
Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1427
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,427 Views
Message 4 of 8

Here's another study making the rounds: Cyclists Age Better: http://www.drmirkin.com/fitness/cyclists-age-better.html

 

Snippets:

 

Amazing Benefits in Immunity
With aging, the thymus gland in the front of your upper chest shrinks and progressively loses some of its ability to make T-cells that help to protect you from developing cancers and infections. The most surprising news from this study is that the thymus glands of the older cyclists produced as many T-cells as those of the young people.

 

T-cells recognize foreign proteins on the surface of invading germs and cancers to tell your immunity to attack and kill these cells. They then stimulate your immune system to make antibodies to attach to and kill invading germs and cancer cells, and produce chemicals called cytokines that activate other T-cells to remove germs and cancer cells from your body. Other regulatory T-cells dampen down your immunity so that your immunity does not attack and destroy your own healthy cells.

 

Larger and Stronger Muscles and Better Use of Oxygen
The authors took muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis muscle in the front of the cyclists' upper legs, the muscles strengthened most by cycling. The cyclists' muscles did not show the expected signs of aging:


• drop in muscle size,
• drop in mitochondrial protein content, and
• decrease in ability to take in and use oxygen.
Their muscles did show a decrease in capillary blood vessel density. The cyclists' maximal ability to take in and use oxygen, move air in their lungs, and develop muscle power (wattage) were like those of the much younger people.

 

This article goes on to say that even a bit of exercise can help a person with heart disease to live longer.  

 

I say: exercise (a lot) now in order to avoid getting heart disease (and other lifestyle diseases). Smiley Happy

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1427
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1440
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,440 Views
Message 5 of 8

@Epsterwrote:

PS All that said: sure any movement is better than none. Absolutely. Still, fitness and health require more than a few casual walks a day. This I know for sure, from my own experience of getting back into shape.

 

 


>>

Thank you for your opinion.  Smiley Happy

 

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1440
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1449
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,449 Views
Message 6 of 8

Forgive me, but imma gonna wait for the movie. Smiley Happy

 

I mean to say that the people I know who work out even according to government guidelines are ill and have far shorter life expectancies than the people I know who are competing at the senior games and winning gold medals. I see 80-90 year old athletes who are super fit, energetic and who have zero illnesses. Then I see 40-60 year olds who watch hours of TV, and eat out a lot and they are also downing quite a volume of prescriptions.

 

Now, the above may well just be the people I know and the view of the world I have, nevertheless, this study strikes me as a study that will be reversed once more peer review occurs. 

 

So I say: get up and go go go go go! Your life depends upon it. Smiley Happy

 

 

Wishing excellent health for all,

Epster, who intends to compete for more medals this year; whose BMI on the athlete's calculator is 20 (so I know of what I speak) and who daily out-paces 20-somethings 

 

 

 

PS All that said: sure any movement is better than none. Absolutely. Still, fitness and health require more than a few casual walks a day. This I know for sure, from my own experience of getting back into shape.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1449
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1461
Views

Re: Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,461 Views
Message 7 of 8

I was pleased to read this article..  too many of them imho imply that if you are not going to go for the big time, ie the high milage workouts, you might as well sit in a chair and the studies just do not support that.  Lots of people cannot do the big workouts and if you can't then do what you are able. But don't just sit there!!

 

“The message is that all physical activity counts,” says Dr. William Kraus, a professor at Duke University who conducted the study with researchers from the National Cancer Institute.

“The little things that people do every day,” like walking from their cars to the office or climbing a flight of stairs, “can and do add up and affect the risk for disease and death,” he says."

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
1461
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
1463
Views
7
Replies

Those 2-Minute Walk Breaks? They Add Up

1,463 Views
Message 8 of 8

Walk for two minutes. Repeat 15 times. Or walk for 10 minutes, thrice. The benefits for longevity appear to be almost exactly the same, according to an inspiring new study of physical activity patterns and life spans.

It finds that exercise does not have to be prolonged in order to be beneficial. It just has to be frequent.

Most of us who are interested in health know that federal exercise guidelines recommend we work out moderately for at least 30 minutes per day at least five times per week in order to reduce our risks of developing many diseases or dying prematurely.

These guidelines also recommend that we accumulate those 30 minutes of daily exercise in bouts lasting for at least 10 minutes at a time.

The guidelines, first published in 2008, were based on the best exercise science available at the time, including several studies indicating that if exercise sessions were briefer than 10 minutes, they would not increase people’s aerobic fitness, meaning their athletic endurance.

 

But improving endurance is not the same thing as improving health.

So when scientists and governmental regulators recently began planning a major update to the 2008 exercise guidelines, they decided, as part of their research, to gather the latest studies about exercise bouts and how long workouts should last in order to benefit health.

Somewhat to their surprise, they found only a few relevant, large-scale, recent studies, and most of these relied on people’s notoriously unreliable memories of how active they had been.

So, some of the scientists working on the new exercise guidelines decided that they would need to mount a major new study themselves.

They began by looking for reliable and objective data about ordinary people’s exercise habits.

 https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/well/move/walking-exercise-minutes-death-longevity.html?&moduleDe...

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
1463
Views
7
Replies