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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

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Message 31 of 91

Just who exactly is it that proclaims it's all safe and nutritous?  Who are their bosses and who pays their salaries?  Of course all information needs to be taken with a grain of salt and studied and looked into.  The first thing to always look into is where the money trail leads to.  Every "believer" and every "nonbeliever" that is professing something as part of their job should be eyed with a certain bit of scepticism.  To try to profess that all pesticides on all of our food is safe beyond question is a downright lie.  We all know there are many people that believe that if a little works pretty good, more will always work that much better, which is absolutely false.  I would much rather have fresh produce with no residues of any kind on them than otherwise, no matter how safe it is proclaimed to be.  People need to learn to wash their veggies and fruit and the fact of the matter is, many people do not even rinse a lot of fresh produce.  If putting a little scare in them gets them to at least wash their food before putting it in their mouth, they've succeeded.   Many of the food related illnesses we've been hearing about over the past few years are a direct result of contaminated food not being washed to an acceptable degree.  Big Ag virtually has to use pesticides and waxes.  The demand for fresh is almost incomprehensable.  There's no way around it.  Each individual has the right to grow their own food if they choose, but that is highly impractical for the masses.  The real problem is that big ag business has stymied smaller operations with the ability to produce more nutritious food.  When vast amounts of money are involved, one better be careful what they put into their mouth.

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

659 Views
Message 32 of 91

ahhh, but how much better you might feel later on and how many more years you may live if not for those residues winding up in your body.  I too was a child in the 50s.  The body is a magnificent machine that can take a lot of abuse for many years.  We've all seen cig smokers that are 100.  The thing is, it pays to stay informed and make changes along the way whenever possible if it seems in your best interest.  I did many "stupid" things over many years and survived just fine.  That doesn't mean I could continue down those same paths and expect to do fine.  One can always do better for themselves, or not.  They used to burn cane behind our house in the 50s.  We only had an attic fan and left our windows open at night, in the very deep south.  Every morning there'd be soot, ashes and burnt cane on our window sills and obviously in our lungs.  I survived.  Of course I had asthma till I finally moved away when I went into the army and have had sleep apnea for the past 20 years.  Maybe the burning cane had something to do with that.  Maybe not.  Just glad all the cane fields close by are gone now.  Little things to add up usually, even if it takes 50 or 80 years.  Why suffer any more than necessary?

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Re: The dirty dozen

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Message 33 of 91

hahaha.  I don't know if you were talking to me, but if you were, you must be old.  I can remember back to about 1954 eating a tomato my mom grew and how good it was.  She never used any kind of pesticides and washed everything in vinegar water.  Organic and homegrown always taste so much better.  Most people wouldn't believe how much.  I grew my first bananas last year, some kind of short fat sweet little babies.  I've never eaten bananas in my whole life that could compare to those, not even close, and I eat a lot of bananas.  I quit eating raw tomatoes for the most part about 20 years ago because of gout and never had a flare up till last year when I had some growing right out my front door.  I couldn't help myself.  They were some of the best cherry tomatoes I've ever eaten and I was eating about 3 or 4 every single morning for a month and WHAM!!!!  My feet like to have blown off.  I quit immediately and it all went away in a couple of days.  I've grown food my whole life, sometimes way more than other times, but always something.  Lately I've been growing lots of different varieties of lettuce, kale, arugula, all kinds of greens and I can tell you, they're outrageous.  You can't buy that kind of food in a store.  Grow it, pick it, wash it and eat it.  My plum tree just started bearing this past year and I can't remember a plum being so good since I was a kid.  I truly believe that pesticides cause fresh produce to go bad much faster than organically grown stuff.  We get stuff in at our produce dept. that comes in covered in mold sometimes.  Strawberries really are the worst.  Sometimes they'll be beautiful and look like they were picked at the right time and they'll last a long time.  Other times they'll come in and within a day or two they start deteriorating badly and just look weird.  Raspberries are even worse I think.  They're so soft and delicate to begin with.

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Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

646 Views
Message 34 of 91

First the USDA doesn’t put out a “dirty” list. The EWG publishes that misleading characterization. AARP would better serve seniors on warning them away from the EWG. They prey on people’s fears and steer them toward more expensive options. Many seniors are on tight budgets.  AARP should be looking out for us, not spreading such information.

 

 

The next time EWG publishes their fear-mongering you could counter with the Pesticide Residue Calculator.

 

Here is an example for strawberries:

 

>>A child could consume 181 servings of Strawberries in one day
without any effect even if the Strawberries have the highest pesticide residue recorded for Strawberries by USDA.<<

 

From the calculator page:

 

>>Health experts and scientists say produce, grown either conventionally or organically, is safe to eat for you and your children. Not only are conventionally and organically grown fruits and vegetables safe and nutritious, Americans should be consuming more of these, not less, if they hope to reduce their risk of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity.<<

 

http://safefruitsandveggies.com/pesticide-calculator

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

634 Views
Message 35 of 91

You're one of the intelligent ones, but most people might do a quick rinse and figure that's good.  I've done it.  I'm like you for the most part though, water with vinegar added and soak.  I work in a produce dept. and I see people all the time take a small fruit and just pop it in their mouth.  That's just stupid.  We get food in sometimes and right off the truck some of it is covered in mold.  Sometimes we rinse some things and you can see the dirty water flow off.  Everyone needs to assume fresh produce is dirty.  Like you, I'm figuring vinegar has the ability to wash away any type of residues, including pesticide, and if not totally, at least it'll reduce it or possibly neutralize it to some extent.  The thing is, even if you don't see any ill effects, that really does mean nothing.  It's the cumulative effects that build up over decades that have the potential of finally showing up.  Our miraculous bodies can take care of a lot of stuff for a very long time before being adversely affected.  Just saying.  And I know, something is going to kill us anyway.

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Info Seeker

Re: The dirty dozen

583 Views
Message 36 of 91

as a child of the 50s way before all the hoopla about pesticides and our food all kinds of chemicals were used during the growing process. anyone remember ddt , now that was some bad stuff and it was finally banned, my point is here i am at 66 and still doing fine.just use common sense and wash your fruits and veggies before you eat them . i eat everything listed on the bad food list for having a higher pestisticide level . i just take the precaution of washing thouroughly before eating them

 

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Re: The dirty dozen

629 Views
Message 37 of 91

I agree with you although I started eating organic much sooner than you did.  And what people do not get is that organic tastes so much better.  My grandson would not eat strawberries .  I purchased a few plants for him and he was growing them in a window box that his father attached to his fence.  Naturally, he was going to taste one since he had cared for them.  Upon eating one he said Nanny, these taste so different.  I like these.  And I thought, of course you like them.  They'e not contaminated with foul-tasting pesticides.  And I find it the same with most produce.  

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Re: The dirty dozen

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Message 38 of 91

Regarding the dirty dozen changing my eating preferences for fruits and vegetables?  Nope! Won't change a thing for us, mainly because we don't just "rinse" these lovely morsels with water when we get them home.   We thoroughly wash them with WHITE VINEGAR, as we do with all fruits and vegetables before we consume them for ourselves or served to many, many others over the years, with virtually no known or reported health consequences.  v/r   georgie davis, ft. washington, md

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Re: The dirty dozen

681 Views
Message 39 of 91

A few points to consider:

 

Most pesticides, antifungals, and other chemical cocktails used to produce "pretty" produce are usually unwashable because they are not terribly soluable in water. Everyone thinks these chemicals are applied directly to product you eat. Not at all. Many are sprayed on plants way before any kind of flowers or fruiting bodies are developing, which means they are already in the plant itself. My father's side of the family were farmers. Back in the 1970s, I remember talking to my uncles about this "new" means of controlling pests, etc., they had invested in. This stuff was so toxic that you had to purchase additional equipment (of course!) where the neurotoxic pesticide was literally injected into the soil prior to planting because the aerosolized chemicals were that dangerous to Humans. I asked them whether or not it did not bother them to put them in harm's way of such a dangerous substance. Apparently, they were "assured" by the vendor that as long as they wore some kind of mask, they could not be harmed. (I think they used a wet rag, being good ol' Kansas boys who still remembered the Dust Bowl.) Fast-forward to nowadays. All of them are dead. The last one survived up to ten years ago. All died of non-Alzheimers, non-multi-infarct dementias. In other words, their brains were turned into oatmeal. Including my aunts. My cousins have children with more severe developmental disorders than the usual you hear about (autism, aspergers, ADHD, etc.). I know they had more contact to these pesticides (which have been taken off the market because of their severe toxicity), these chemicals still travel down the food chain and don't just magically disappear from the soil after a few years.

 

I am very pleased at those who support local organic produce resources. I've done enough organic gardening (reaching as far back as 1967 when there weren't any Whole Foods or Clark's... anywhere) to know that you aren't getting cosmetically pleasing fruits and vegetables. However, you are getting wonderful flavors from breeds that will never make it to the local stores. I never buys strawberries. Not because they are on the Dirty Dozen list. They are tasteless! Worthless! I had alpine strawberries providing erosion support when I was living in Alaska. I traded my excess for huckleberries from my neighbors across the street. And I greedily ate all the salmonberries on our bushes before my husband could get his hands on them. (Rare but probably the most beautiful and tasty raspberry-looking berry I have ever seen. The only fruit I have ever seen that mimics all the colors of the sunrise.)

 

As for the comment of those who are still living in their eighties right now, you are a very rare sliver of the pie chart. More than likely, you lucked out by accidentally minimizing exposure and having excellent genes promoting longevity. Good for you! But if you check the demographics right now, our personal life expectancies have DROPPED, the first time in... well, maybe ever. Google the dangers of microwaving food and a piece of research done in 1993 in Switzerland. This might be contributing to it. I'm still shocked at all the "healthy" people who have been watching their fats and exercising and doing all the right things having heart attacks in their latter 30s! And not necessarily because of some kind of familial cholesterol diseases.

 

Go figure.

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

725 Views
Message 40 of 91

I feel relatively confident in our scientific community and to be honest with yourself, surely you would have to say that ignoring any and all precautions about pesticides on your food would be foolish.  Remember, the body is a magnificent machine that can rejuvenate itself quite efficiently, for many years, all depending on your overall state of health.  I think they are giving us a worse case scenario and it is up to us to use their info and go from there.  As far as very old people, you surely realize that the first half of their life was probably spent eating mostly non poisoned food.  Like you said though, most of us have been eating fresh stuff for many years and only rinsing it off with straight water and most of us are still alive.  Some people are able and truly desire to take ever precaution they can as to what they injest and the scientists are giving them the info they're looking for.  Ultimately, each of us are responsible for own bodies and have the right to do as we please.  It's all something to certainly think about.  We all know that big businesses are in business for 1 sole reason and that is money, as much of it as possible at as little cost as possible and is poisons make for more beautiful produce at less cost, then that's the way it will be produced.  We all have a right to know what we're dealing with so we can make our own decision as to how to deal with it.

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