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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

9,095 Views
Message 11 of 91
My exact thoughts.  I too worked for an arm of the Federal Government for 25 years.  The thing is, they're no different than big business.  Who ever is in charge always has some ulterior motive and it's rarely in our best interest, no matter how adamantly they profess otherwise.  You cannot trust anyone or anything if there is the possibility of large amounts of money being involved and pronouncing something safe or not can be the difference in millions and even billions of dollars over the years.  Most people who have a job do as they're told because they enjoy having a job.  Being blackballed for blabbing can have very adverse effects on one's bank account.  And the outside influence is basically criminal.

 

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Info Seeker

Re: The dirty dozen

9,123 Views
Message 12 of 91
I never trusted the EPA, and I used to work for the federal government. The EPA told Kenai City Water they couldn't use deep aquaphors for the city water supply because they were unsafe. They had to use the more shallow run-off sources. Guess what? The deep aquaphors were free of contamination while the shallow run-off was LOADED with heavy metals, causing too many health issues in my patients. Yeah, right. Great advice, bureaucrats! If you want to know what dangerous, check the MSDS sheets. Remember when parabens were considered "safe" preservatives in body care products? The MSDS says do NOT expose skin to any level of parabens. I'd sooner trust MSDS sheets than what the EPA (or OSHA) says. Remember: DDT used to be considered "safe". Remember the government educational films where they were exposing school kids to DDT?
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Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

9,072 Views
Message 13 of 91

EPA requires industry to conduct about 120 scientific studies on each pesticide proposed for use on food crops. The studies are based on contemporary scientific test methods and peer reviewed by external expert scientists, and these studies and methods are required around the world by all developed countries, regulatory authorities. EPA's pesticide scientists rigorously assess the studies' results and conduct conservative risk assessments to decide whether the pesticide can be used safely by applicators, consumers and the environment. EPA sets allowable maximum levels of residues for each pesticide on each crop. These levels must be safe for all age groups, races, genders based on a daily and lifetime consumption.  Actual residues are usually 10-1000x less than allowable levels. It's unfortunate EWG and other groups fail to be transparent and do not present a whole story to the public.

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Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

9,088 Views
Message 14 of 91

This list is like a list of thngs or activities that have a potential hazard...it does not tell you the hazard, the quantity of a hazard or likelihood (risk) of acquiring the hazard over any length of time....sort of like a list of cars, airplanes, boats, lightning, aspirin, ...  All things are potentially hazardous.  Read EPA's website about risk assessment and dietary exposures to pesticides (EPA regulates pesticides in the US).  Most fruits and veggies have 0 to a few parts per billion of pesticides in or on them...levels 1000 - 100,000 X below levels shown to cause effects in many toxicology studies.  For example, EPA will not allow a pestcide to be sold or used if the potential cancer risk from consuming a pesticide every day for a life-time is greater than one-in-one million chance of acquiring cancer.  Buy and eat what you wish but don't be fooled by a list like EWG's.  Exposure does not equal risk...if you think it does, stop driving, you might be in an accident that causes you harm.

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Info Seeker

Re: The dirty dozen

9,084 Views
Message 15 of 91

Yes, I will definetly stop buying strawberries unless they are organic.  I was surprised that blueberries were not on the good list.  I recently heard they do not absorb pesticides like strawberries which were described as absorbing perticides like a sponge.  I think some of the good list items are because they have a outer layer like pineapple, avacado, mango, and papaya.  I was actually surprised cauliflower was on the good list.  GREAT!

 

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Re: The dirty dozen

5,807 Views
Message 16 of 91

I will definitely change the fruits I buy based on this report.

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Re: The dirty dozen

1,893 Views
Message 17 of 91

I have been buying more and more organic products for the past few months, and always for the the items concidered the the dirty dozen.  I believe strawberries that are not organic or grown yourself are like just taking poison.  My mom was an extreamly healthy 84 year old active women, she has always eaten well and eaten an abundance of strawberries throughout her life.  She now has pancreatic cancer and I believe there is a correlation between the two.   So in regards to changing my choices for me and my family YES!  

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

1,940 Views
Message 18 of 91

You got that right.  Personally, sweet peppers are some of my favorites.  I've grown dozens of different varieties and there is nothing like picking a beautiful bright red pepper and devouring it right there on the spot.  You can't buy that in any store.  Time is of essence.  The sooner after picking you can eat it, the better it's going to taste and the nutritional value is probably also at its highest.  Growing ain't all that easy, but the reward is more than worth it.  Since I started growing asparagus a few years back, I have to say, that is so good to snap a stalk off and put it in your mouth like you'd be putting a tree limb in a shredder.  

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Conversationalist

Re: The dirty dozen

1,492 Views
Message 19 of 91

I agree with locally grown. I love my local Farmer’s Market. But for me it is freshness that has the most impact not how it is grown. Same for home grown. That fresh out of your own garden is hard to beat and the taste is fantastic.

 

The big business agriculture that fills our supermarkets with organic and convention produce are pretty much the same. The science is clear that on both safety and nutrition the difference if any, are negligible.

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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: The dirty dozen

1,490 Views
Message 20 of 91

jc137594 wrote:

I understand what you're saying.  First of all, I take responsibility for my own safety and well being.  We do live in the land of "Let the buyer beware."  That goes for independent groups, non-profits, corporatiions and government agencies.  My belief is that whenever any considerable amount of money is involved, whether it's donations, earnings, salaries and where politics, doctrines, isms, religions are involved, one ALWAYS has to look at all the information very closely and with a certain amount of skeptisism.  Education and knowledge is always in one's best interest, the more and the more diversified, the better. >>

 

This is definiately true..  everyone should read and research themselves.. it is hard to find a  neutral source.

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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