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The Hidden Dangers of 'Skinny Fat'

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We recently talked about the issues with being skinny-fat. This is an older article on the skinny-fat issue.

 

Snippets:

 

When Elizabeth Chanatry was 16 years old, she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. You’d never know it by looking at the 5-foot-3-inch tall, 117-pound 19-year-old, but even Chanatry admits that she’s not as fit as she could be. “My sister and I are not toned, but we are thin,” she says. Chanatry has genetics to thank for her physique, but also for her diabetes—her older sister and father both suffer from the disease too. For as long as she could remember Chanatry drank Diet Coke and asked for sugar-free syrup to avoid too much of the sweet stuff, but when she started to get symptoms for diabetes, she knew it hadn’t been enough.

 

Obesity is a serious epidemic in the U.S., but the problem, doctors say, is that we are putting too much weight on weight. When the CDC released obesity numbers last week, we cheered that the rate had fallen so drastically for children ages 2 to 5, even though obesity rates overall remained relatively flat. People with stellar metabolisms and magical genes may not look the part, but they can have the same medical issues as an obese person: type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and out-of-control blood sugar. It should be obvious, but a culture obsessed with weight doesn’t always remember that appearances of health can be skin deep.

 

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A 2008 study found that about one-fourth of U.S. adults with normal weight have some form of an unhealthy heart, like high blood pressure or cholesterol. Older adults with normal BMIs (well-known to be an imperfect measurement) but high levels of body fat are at greater risk for cardiovascular disease and death than previously realized, according to a 2013 study published in the American Journal of Cardiology. More recently, a 2014 report on people with “normal weight obesity”—normal BMI, high body fat—found that they have a significantly higher risk of metabolic problems and death from these diseases than any other group.

 

Time's entire piece on the dangers of being skinny-fat: http://time.com/14407/the-hidden-dangers-of-skinny-fat/?xid=tcoshare

 

skinny-fat.jpgProper diet and exercise equals better health

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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