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Re: Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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@ASTRAEA  Sounds like a great event!

 

Those doddering stereotypes are one reason I've amassed a crew of senior athlete peeps IRL: because our unifying question is: What is possible? Can we beat younger athletes? Can we beat our own best time? Can we still hike, dance, learn and enjoy like we used to? Can we still live as vibrantly as we used to?

 

To a person --ages ranging from 55 to 82-- the answer is yes. The goal is to live our absolute best life for as long as possible, and to help each other along the way. Exercise is key to our collective goal, as is a healthy diet and maintaining 'normal' weight. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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@Epster - Last week I attended a great presentation at the county community college, with 3 excellent speakers, all of whom counseled against using "senior stereotypes" in conversation .. even to be amusing about ourselves. I'm so tired of the people who whine or are dismissive of of themselves as seniors, as if we suddenly become "doddering" at 55! We just got another blast of snow overnight, so I just spent the last 40 minutes shoveling my deck & the driveway .. fingers cold, but not at all winded or tired.


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Re: Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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Hi @ASTRAEA  nice to see you here. Smiley Happy

 

Yes, you are correct: this article is not talking about the fat in one's diet, but the fat on one's body.

 

We eat crispy chicken skin and fatty fish and avocado and olive oil and (gasp!) a little butter and nuts and both of us have reached 19% body fat on this eating regimen, according to the athletes's BMI calculator. We both have waists that measure less than 30 inches and are well within 'normal' weight on the standard BMI calculator. All that to illustrate that it is not the eating of fat that is necessarily bad (but people please note that DH, me and Astraea are also active exercisers and very, very, very particular about the quality of fat in our diets) instead it is the fat that we allow to accumulate on our bodies that is harmful to our health. Big difference. 

 

(Thanks for making that point, Astraea. Also: huge congratulations on finding the health regimen that works best for you. Smiley Happy)

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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@Epster - I wonder if you can edit the title of this discussion, because "Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated", isn't the same as saying "The Harmful Effects of Being Overweight (or "Fat")Underestimated"!

 

Since I went Paleo, I eat roasted free-ranging chicken with its crispy skin, bison & lamb burgers, and I lost a lot of weight (and continue to maintain that). So it's not EATING healthy fats, but being overweight, that's the problem!


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Re: Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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OK!  So who is making a New Years Resolution to lose weight and or to improve their health outlook? 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Study: Fat's Harmful Effects Underestimated

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Harmful effects of being overweight underestimated

Study measured effects of high and low BMI in 60,000 parents and children

 

 

 

Story snippets:obese man.jpg

 

The harmful effects of being overweight have been underestimated, according to a new study that analysed body mass index (BMI), health and mortality data in around 60,000 parents and their children, to establish how obesity actually influences risk of death. The University of Bristol study is published in the International Journal of Epidemiology (Dec. 1).

 

fat.jpgPrevious studies have suggested that the optimum BMI, at which the risk of death is minimised, appears to be above the range normally recommended by doctors, leading to claims it is good for health to be mildly overweight. However, scientists suspect these studies do not reflect the true effect of BMI on health, because early stages of illness, health-damaging behaviours, such as cigarette smoking, and other factors can lead to both lower BMI and increased risk of death. This makes it difficult to estimate how BMI actually influences risk of death (the causal effect), as opposed to the observed association between BMI and risk of death. This aim of this study was to assess the causal link between BMI and risk of death.

 

 obese couple.jpg

 

The current advice from doctors to maintain a BMI of between 18.5 and 25 is supported by this study, and the widely reported suggestion that being overweight may be healthy is shown to be incorrect.

 

 

 

 

 

Read the entire article:  

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171201104450.htm

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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