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Re: Small Amounts of Alcohol Can Increase Risk of Cancer & Heart Attack

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Message 11 of 12

 

Unhappy News?

 

For some, certainly. I didn't have my first drink until I was in my 30s. We were never big drinkers, and were not into social drinking at all, but I used to enjoy an occasional martini or a full glass of pinot noir or a pint of wee heavy. That is until, some 4 years back, when I learned that a single serving of wine is just 5 ounces. That didn't seem worth the dirty glass, so I decided to just stop. And did. Then DH joined me. Now we share a bottle of beer about once every six weeks or so. We did dribble brandy into eggnog a couple weeks ago, our once a year daliance. So anyway, yeah, once we decided to virtually eliminate alcohol from our diet, we found it rather easy to abstain.

 

I'm glad we chose this road, for since we quit drinking, 5 of our combined 7 siblings have been stricken with serious lifestyle diseases. All either smoke, drink, carry 30 plus extra pounds or exercise lightly a couple times a week (or not at all). Neither of us has ever smoked, and as stated we were light drinkers and now abstain, plus we typically average over 60 minutes of moderate-to-hard exercise a day. Still, maybe we'll have our own lifestyle-related illnesses down the road. For now, though, we are both perfectly healthy, on zero medications, have zero illnesses and remain quite hopeful about a healthy future.

 

And we wish the same for everyone reading this. Smiley Happy  

 

What about you? What do you think about this report? Does it make you think about cutting back or cutting out alcohol?

snifter.jpg

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Small Amounts of Alcohol Can Increase Risk of Cancer & Heart Attack

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Message 12 of 12

 

 How Alcohol Can Lead to Cancer

 

  

spilled wine.jpgAlcohol can damage every cell in your body. Your liver is the only organ that can break down significant amounts of alcohol and it does this on a time-limited basis. The alcohol is first converted to acetaldehyde, which is even more damaging to your cells than alcohol. Acetaldehyde can cause cancer by damaging DNA and stopping your cells from healing from this damage. The highest risk for alcohol-induced cancer is in your mouth and throat because some bacteria there are able to convert ethanol directly into acetaldehyde. Alcohol damages cells to produce Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) that can alter DNA to cause cancer. Alcohol reaches the colon, rectum and liver later so the link between these cancers and alcohol is not as strong.

 

 

Alcohol Can Damage the Heart
People who take in just one drink a day are at significantly increased risk for an enlarged upper heart and irregular heartbeats called atrial fibrillation that causes clots and strokes (J Am Heart Assoc, Sep 14, 2016;5:e004060).

 

Moderate Drinking Has Not Been Shown to Prevent Heart Attacks
For many years the wine, beer and alcoholic beverage industries have promoted studies showing that a drink or two of alcohol can help to prevent heart attacks, yet drinking alcohol regularly is associated with high blood pressure, heart failure, strokes and sudden death. In the studies cited by the alcohol industry, more than half of the people in the "non-drinker" groups were recovering alcoholics or people who had been told to stop drinking because they had already suffered from diseases caused in part by drinking, such as liver, heart or kidney disease, high blood pressure, heart attacks, certain cancers, alcoholism, stomach ulcers or other major health problems (J Stud on Alc and Drugs, March, 2016;77(2):185–198). When people with alcohol-related diseases were removed from the abstainer groups, the data showed that moderate drinkers did not have a lower incidence of heart attacks than the non-drinkers.

 

Alcohol Increases Risk of Permanent Liver Damage
Drinking alcohol regularly increases risk for permanent liver damage called cirrhosis (Journal of Hepatology, January 26, 2015). Wine is associated with a lower risk for liver damage than beer or liquor. The authors of this study warn that older drinkers are more likely to have health conditions affected by alcohol or to take medicines that impair their ability to metabolize alcohol.

 

 

Put down that drink and read the entire article:  http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/even-small-amounts-of-alcohol-can-increase-risks-for-cancer-and-he...

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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