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Re: Omega-6, Anti-inflammation Diet and Lifestyle

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@retiredtraveler wrote:

 

".... I think @retiredtraveler eats more stir fry than do we, but as we otherwise appear to follow a remarkably similar diet, and are also similar with regard to workout frequency and intensity, I’ll use us instead of him as example.

 

We eat what can probably be best described as a Mediterranean /Anti-Inflammation diet hybrid. That is to say we eat mostly plant-based, mostly cooked from scratch at home food with small amounts of meats, plenty of olive oil and next to no processed foods. (Being defined here as fast food, restaurant food and packaged grocery store food— all of which are leading sources of today’s Omega-6 rich US food environment.) We do not drink (last month we shared one beer) but we do eat butter (mixed 50/50 with olive oil). And we have no inflammation issues. No arthritis, no pain....".

 

Sounds about right. One big difference. I have a couple glasses of wine a night. It's my one bad health habit (that I know of).  At the same time, we do not have dessert at home. The wine replaces that as far as sugar. We have no other sweets in the house (well, DW will indulge in some chocolate).
   Another thing that I usually add to stir fry are canned tomatoes. That's another big anti-oxidant along with my daily dose of blueberries.  I guess whatever I'm doing is working so far.   

@retiredtraveler That's the thing, isn't it? Find what works best for your body, your lifestyle, your health goals. You and your wife's persistent actions to guard your good health are inspiring.

 

Outside of the weight loss maxim about using more energy than you take in I don't know if there is such a thing as a one size fits all healthy menu. It might be easier if there was, but just think of all the lifestyle gurus who'd be out of a job. Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Omega-6, Anti-inflammation Diet and Lifestyle

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".... I think @retiredtraveler eats more stir fry than do we, but as we otherwise appear to follow a remarkably similar diet, and are also similar with regard to workout frequency and intensity, I’ll use us instead of him as example.

 

We eat what can probably be best described as a Mediterranean /Anti-Inflammation diet hybrid. That is to say we eat mostly plant-based, mostly cooked from scratch at home food with small amounts of meats, plenty of olive oil and next to no processed foods. (Being defined here as fast food, restaurant food and packaged grocery store food— all of which are leading sources of today’s Omega-6 rich US food environment.) We do not drink (last month we shared one beer) but we do eat butter (mixed 50/50 with olive oil). And we have no inflammation issues. No arthritis, no pain....".

 

Sounds about right. One big difference. I have a couple glasses of wine a night. It's my one bad health habit (that I know of).  At the same time, we do not have dessert at home. The wine replaces that as far as sugar. We have no other sweets in the house (well, DW will indulge in some chocolate).
   Another thing that I usually add to stir fry are canned tomatoes. That's another big anti-oxidant along with my daily dose of blueberries.  I guess whatever I'm doing is working so far.   

"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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Omega-6, Anti-inflammation Diet and Lifestyle

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@retiredtraveler @ASTRAEA This is an offshoot of the conversation being held here: http://community.aarp.org/t5/Healthy-Living/Nutrition-Labels-Telling-1-2-the-Story-RE-Your-Food-s-Ca...

To recap: We started talking about the health factor of various cooking oils. Specifically mentioned were olive, canola, peanut, avocado and coconut oils. All are considered good, healthy oils if used properly and in balance. Here’s a run down of various oils (this sadly excludes avocado oil) as regards to use and health. 

 

And here’s an interesting chart of cooking oils delineating uses, health factors and such. It’s printable, so you can stick a copy on your fridge if you like. The image below is a portion of that chart.

 

Andy's cooking oil chart.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

@ASTRAEA I think your comment on that prior thread about using avocado oil over peanut oil illustrates my oft-repeated thought about each of us being responsible for knowing our bodies, our systematic weaknesses and how our lifestyle aids and abets good health. As I see it, we proceed toward improved health from that point of knowledge.

 

For instance, I think @retiredtraveler eats more stir fry than do we, but as we otherwise appear to follow a remarkably similar diet, and are also similar with regard to workout frequency and intensity, I’ll use us instead of him as example.

 

We eat what can probably be best described as a Mediterranean /Anti-Inflammation diet hybrid. That is to say we eat mostly plant-based, mostly cooked from scratch at home food with small amounts of meats, plenty of olive oil and next to no processed foods. (Being defined here as fast food, restaurant food and packaged grocery store food— all of which are leading sources of today’s Omega-6 rich US food environment.) We do not drink (last month we shared one beer) but we do eat butter (mixed 50/50 with olive oil). And we have no inflammation issues. No arthritis, no pain. I use peanut oil sparingly, for my once a year spring rolls, our stir frys, basically anytime whatever I'm cooking stove top requires high heat. 

 

Whereas a person suffering from acute inflammation might do well to ferret out every last morsel of inflammation-causing foods in his diet, our experience suggests an otherwise healthy person who regularly exercises hard and who eats the way we do need not worry about the relatively small amount of peanut oil one would use in a stir fry. 

 

 

Peanut oil does contain omega-6. Omega-6 is a contributor to inflammation. Certainly inflammation is a contributor to most of our diseases and pains. Therefore switching to an anti-inflammation diet is probably going to help nearly everyone feel better, longer.  

 

Here’s Web MD on omega-6:

Anti-inflammatory Diet: Road to Good Health?
Experts discuss the potential disease-fighting benefits of diets that try to reduce inflammation

 

"The average American diet, Greenfield says, includes far too many foods rich in omega-6 fatty acids, found in processed and fast foods, and far too few rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as those found in cold-water fish or supplements. 

 

Phytochemicals -- natural chemicals found in the plant foods suggested on the diets -- are also believed to help reduce inflammation."

 

 

Here WebMD talks about peanut oil as an agent for lowering cholesterol. Also, interestingly, this article states that it is used as a topical to relieve arthritis pain. Arthritis, of course being one of the major issues with an inflammatory diet, and as we know, the skin absorbs most of what is topically applied. So that's a trifle confusing, isn't it?

 

Here Harvard Health skirts the issue ("and other nuts").

 

Harvard Health Inflamation graphic.pngHarvard Health graphic 

It's not just these well regarded health information sources seemingly going back and forth on the issues. Many nutritionists, medical professionals and researchers assert that peanuts are a worthy inclusion in an anti-inflammation diet. But look at that omega-6. It’s a sticky wicket, as the Brits say. And that takes us back to each person knowing what it is they are working with or against with regards to their health. Peanut oil may be an excellent choice for some and a terrible choice for others. 

 

I'm for each of us looking at the whole picture, taking the holistic approach.

 

For anyone interested: this SELF Magazine Nutrition Data web site is a good resource for discovering the facts about food and ingredients including glycemic index, the inflammation index and the nutrition facts about food: http://nutritiondata.self.com

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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