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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,021
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Medically Speaking, You Can Become 2 Years Younger In 8 Months

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A word about the VO2: in January, I was 57. In September I was 58. The expected VO2 for me in January was 33. The expected VO2 for me in September was 32. So I gained 2 VO2 points. That still doesn't seem to be very good, but this was an online calculator not a test done in a lab, so it's an estimate, not the real number. The only way to get the real value is in a lab. FWIW and all.

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,021
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Medically Speaking, You Can Become 2 Years Younger In 8 Months

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I have become two years younger in the past eight months.

 

I took a fitness calculator test (results below) in January and again in September. The most recent one shows the value of my workout regime: I've become two years younger, medically speaking.

 

So why should you care, anyway? Because while your results may vary based on your present condition, your activity level and your DNA, you, too, could get younger in the next 8 months. How much younger depends upon your willingness and ability to exercise. A lot.

 

Before someone accuses me of blustering braggadocio, please know this: I am not in competition with you; you are not in competition with me. Instead our individual health outlook is in competition with the depredations of time and our lifestyle choices.

 

My January, 2017 results: (I was 57 but had the fitness of an average 26 year old.)

 

My January 2017 resultsMy January 2017 results

 

My September, 2017 results: (I was 58 but had the fitness of an average 24 year old.)

 

My September, 2017 results.My September, 2017 results. 

 

So what exercises did I do, you may ask, to travel back in time? I worked out to the tune of 900 minutes a week. That's over 2 hours a day divided into these disciplines: hand weight and resistance training; mini-trampoline workouts, cycling and fast walking over rolling hills combined with careful attention to what I ate, when I ate it and what quantity I ate. And I lost 10 pounds.

 

Sound like crazy over-abundance? Consider this: Orville Rodgers, 98, senior athlete and holder of 15 World Records, exercises 10 hours a week. Says he: "I have a determination to hang in there. Keep going. Never give up. There are perfectly rational reasons to NOT want to exercise as you get older; it hurts, you're worried about falling, perhaps some of your friends aren't around to work out with. And yet it's pretty hard to argue with the results." (See this CBS News Story for more about Orville: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/senior-athletes-going-the-distance/)

 

Now, perhaps you do not fancy yourself a senior athlete. That's fine. Perhaps you hate the very idea of exercise and choose a sedentary lifestyle. And that's fine as well, as long as you are aware of and OK with the costs of a sedentary lifestyle. 

 

But if you are looking for a way to peel back the ravages of time and a sedentary lifestyle, may I suggest that you find a way to get moving and keep moving until you are working out like Orville and me?

 

 

"Standard disclaimers apply"  --Epster 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving