You could save on auto insurance when you complete the AARP Smart Driver course! Get a free phone charging set with promo code AARP6.

Reply
Respected Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
15475
Views

Re: Keeping Fit: A Positive Approach to the Aging Process

15,475 Views
Message 41 of 44

Love your new picture!

hoc voluērunt
Gaius Julius Ceasar
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
15475
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
2
Kudos
15659
Views

Re: Keeping Fit: A Positive Approach to the Aging Process

15,659 Views
Message 42 of 44

I'm getting used to using a rebounder; just got it last week.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
15659
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
6
Kudos
15582
Views

Re: Keeping Fit: A Positive Approach to the Aging Process

15,582 Views
Message 43 of 44

Here's how DH and I adapted our simple home gym (really a corner in a workroom) last year with intent to up our core strength: we gave away our treadmill and stationary bike. Last year we averaged 75 miles a weekend on our recumbent trikes, so the stat bike wasn't really rounding out our workouts. And we prefer to walk outside together, so we decided to replace the treadmill with equipment we would use: resistance bands, hand and ankle weights, a magic circle, an ab wheel, a circuit trainer (rebounder) and hula hoop.

 

Our goal is to switch up our workouts, stay interested and motivated, have fun and improve fitness and strength. 

 

If your goal is improved fitness, then check with your doctor to see if any of these exercise possibilities are right for you. But no matter what else you do today, please get moving. Your healthy future depends upon it.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
6
Kudos
15582
Views
Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
6
Kudos
14300
Views
43
Replies

Keeping Fit: A Positive Approach to the Aging Process

14,300 Views
Message 44 of 44

Here's a story of a man who needed to bulk up in his 80s in order to preserve good health. Strength training is important as we age. What are you doing to maintain muscle development and core strength as you age?

 

Keeping Fit: A POSITIVE APPROACH TO THE AGING PROCESS

WAYNE L. WESTCOTT, Ph.D.

SFA National Advisory Board member, Wayne L. Westcott, Ph.D. is Fitness Director of the South Shore YMCA in Quincy, MA., and author of several books including the new releases Building Strength and Stamina and Strength Training Past 50.

 

"The good news is that muscle loss can be changed to muscle gain ..."

 

Most of us speak negatively about getting older, but we usually agree that aging is better than the other alternative. Although the numbers can be discouraging, it is important to realize that our chronological age and our functional age can be very different. Working in the fitness profession for more than 30 years, and conducting thousands of fitness evaluations, I have come to the conclusion that one's functional ability may be only marginally related to one's age.

 

Generally speaking, I have tested 40 year olds who function more like 20 year olds, and others who function more like 60 year olds. That is, there seems to be a 20-year plus or minus effect associated with your level of physical fitness.

 

People sometimes ask me if this exercise factor holds true for older individuals. My answer is an emphatic yes. For example, there are 60 year olds who have the physical capacity of 40 year olds, and there are others whose physical performance resembles that of 80 year olds.

 

But what about people in their 80's and 90's? Certainly we don't expect such elderly individuals to exercise or remain physically active, do we? Perhaps we don't, but we definitely should. Consider the examples of my father, Warren Westcott, and my friend, George Conway, both of whom are in their 90's.

 

My father began Nautilus strength training eight years ago, when he was 82 years of age. At that time he was dangerously thin, weighing only 124 pounds at a height of 5'11".

 

He responded well to the progressive resistance exercise, gradually increasing both his muscle strength and body weight. At age 90, he presently weighs 146 pounds having added about 20 pounds of functional tissue (muscle and bone), and about two pounds of fat. His Nautilus exercise weightloads are so high that many people prefer not to follow him down the line of machines. For example, he completes leg presses with 190 pounds, chest-triceps presses with 160 pounds, and seated rows with 130 pounds. This overall muscular strength makes his daily tasks and lifestyle activities much easier to perform, and provides a high level of personal satisfaction. For example, he can enjoy his daily 20 minute walks or stationary cycling sessions, and he can manage a large house with little difficulty.

 

Taken from: www.seniorfitness.net

Read the rest of this article, and learn how George Conway began his exercise program when he was 80. George is now a competitve senior athlete. http://www.seniorfitness.net/massachusetts_governor.htm 

 

 

George tells it like it is ... if you don't want to lose it then you have to use it!

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
6
Kudos
14300
Views
43
Replies