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Re: How I'm Adjusting my Training Fuel Needs for a Changing Body

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@fwarren1 Well, thanks. I often think I'm a good example of what obsession looks like. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: How I'm Adjusting my Training Fuel Needs for a Changing Body

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Hi Espter,

Looks like you’ve had a very busy weekend. The detail you shared is excellent and impressive.

Great job. You are an excellent role model.

Regards,

Frank
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Re: How I'm Adjusting my Training Fuel Needs for a Changing Body

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aging is not a disease.jpg

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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How I'm Adjusting my Training Fuel Needs for a Changing Body

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This conversation began here: http://community.aarp.org/t5/Healthy-Living/What-s-in-your-protein-powder/m-p/1849000/highlight/fals..., but I'm posting my follow up here to avoid taking the previous thread off-topic.

 

Just to report back, in case anyone is interested in how I’m solving my changing energy/nutrition needs while training like a crazy woman for the senior games. (we race recumbent trikes)

 

Background: I lost about 40 pounds last year, as I began the switch from a mountaineer’s body to a cyclist’s body. (Goodbye muscle-bound speedskater-esque thighs: hello lithe cyclists thighs!) I was a much more muscular mountaineer than I am cyclist. This transition has been fun, and occasionally costly. For instance, my clothing hangs on me now, but the harder cost to bear has been that I cannot train in the same manner as last year, because I do not have the stored energy I once had. Adding to the challenge: I am now 13 pounds lighter than I was at the senior games last fall. These are my training fuel adjustments to date. More may be necessary, we shall see.

 

Last weekend we pedaled 135 miles. 70 the first day and 65 the next. Our moving average was a so-so 13.5 miles per hour. (But 135 miles! Huzzbah!)

 

This past weekend we did 52 miles on Saturday at a moving average of 13.9. Sunday we rode 63 miles. We did Sunday’s ride in stages (working on time trials), so don't have an overall moving average, but our slowest section ended with a moving average of 14.9. Our final 15 miles were at an astounding (to us, because we were sooooo tired) 15.3 miles an hour. 15.3!

 

Keep in mind these are not track rides, but rec trail rides with multiple road crossings and other users on blind curves (read: many, many places where stops or reduced speeds are necessary). Last season we realized a 3+ MPH bump on race day. And it is early in the training season, so we anticipate these moving averages will rise as long as we figure out how to deliver fuel en route. (So far, so good!)

 

Blah blah blah, forgive me, but I’m excited about our progress … here are the adjustments we’ve made to our training day fuel supply:

 

We added potassium to one of the two 2-litre water bladders we carry (this adds 20 calories). We drank 6 liters of water on each of these ride days, btw. 

 

We ate our usual 2-egg whole wheat avocado toast breakfast (slathered in hot sauce to help kill any bugs in our systems) plus our daily banana. (around 450 calories)

 

We split a Kind brand grain bar while riding, also each having about a 1/2 cup of a homemade organic nut/fruit mix.

 

We split one pkg of organic Clif blocks while riding.

 

We lunched on a shared one-slice-of-bread pb&j (organic, whole wheat, low sugar), which means we ate a 1/4 sammie.

 

On the way home we stopped at Chipotle and had a burrito bowl (no cheese or sour cream, but yes to fajita veggies and a side of guacamole, which we split).

 

The numbers: We consumed roughly 1,900 calories yesterday (about 500 while exercising) and expended roughly 3,750 calories. We did the same —sans the caloric Chipotle trip— Saturday.

 

What the numbers mean: there are 3,500 calories in a pound of human flesh (or rather to lose a pound one needs to consume 3,500 calories less than they expend) this weekend, in theory, we each lost one pound. Or more, because Saturday night we ate green salad and a small helping of veggie cous cous.

 

One thing we’ll add as rides get longer and days get hotter is a 5 ounce flask of honey water. But for now we don’t need that boost.

 

 

PS This is not to be taken as a dietary suggestion. Nor is it a suggestion for anyone reading this to jump into an exercise program without first consulting your doctor. It is an illustration of what is possible. We are seriously fit (no meds, no conditions, no diseases, healthy weight) senior athletes in our late 50s.

 

And to put this into perspective: We know both a 70-year-old and an 80-year-old competitive, decorated cyclist. The 70-year-old can kick our butts. The 80-year-old keeps us on our toes. These cyclists are our heroes, and serve as our life goals.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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