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Re: How Gut Bacteria Can Affect Weight

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@HammH  Good point. Thanks!

 

Here's an article about fermented foods that promote healthy gut bacteria: http://www.eatingwell.com/article/281916/7-must-eat-fermented-foods-for-a-healthy-gut/

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: How Gut Bacteria Can Affect Weight

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Fermented foods should have made the list . Weird that they overlooked the power of the ferment

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Re: How Gut Bacteria Can Affect Weight

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Here's a list of good bacteria foods from Prevention:

 

  • Almonds
  • Asparagus
  • Bananas
  • Burdock root
  • Cereal grains (whole wheat, barley, rye)
  • Chicory root
  • Endive
  • Garlic
  • Greens (especially dandelion greens)
  • Jerusalem artichoke
  • Jicama
  • Kiwi
  • Leeks
  • Legumes
  • Mushrooms
  • Oats
  • Onions
  • Salsify

We regularly eat ten of the foods on this list. How about you? What do you do to create/preserve  healthy gut bacteria?

 

From: https://www.prevention.com/weight-loss/diets/best-foods-healthy-gut-bacteria

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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How Gut Bacteria Can Affect Weight

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With the ever-increasing epidemic of obesity in North America, almost 20 percent of children and more than 70 percent of adults are overweight, which increases risk for heart attacks, diabetes, strokes, arthritis and certain cancers.

 

good_bad gut bacteria graph.jpgNot all bacteria is created equally.

  

A study of 84 children and teens shows that the heavier ones have more of the types of gut bacteria that convert carbohydrates into fats so readily that they absorb more calories from their food than the thinner children do (Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Sept. 20, 2016). The participants ranged from ages 7 to 19 and from normal weight to obese, with MRIs used to measure how much fat they had in their bodies. The colons of the heavier children were far more likely than those of the skinny ones to have the eight groups of gut bacteria that have been previously associated with carbohydrate fermentation to short chain fatty acids that markedly increases the number of calories absorbed from food (Nutr Clin Pract, April 2012;27(2):201–214).

 

gut-bacteria.jpgGut Bacteria Can Contribute To Obesity

 

Since bacteria in your colon eat the same food that you do, what you eat determines which types of bacteria thrive in your colon. These bacteria are a prime driver of how high your blood sugar rises after meals and how many calories you absorb from the food you eat. Many epidemiological studies show that people who take in lots of sugared drinks and sugar-added foods, foods made with flour (ground whole grains) and other refined carbohydrates are more likely to be overweight and that those who eat lots of fruits, vegetables, nuts and grains that have not been ground into flour tend to be thin.

 

Gut Bacteria and Carbohydrate Absorption
Carbohydrates are sugars alone, in pairs and in chains of up to millions of sugars bound together. Only single sugars can be absorbed into your bloodstream. You can't even absorb two sugars bound together, so enzymes in your intestines and bacteria in your colon break them apart. For example, milk contains a double sugar called lactose. To split the double sugar into single sugars that can be absorbed, your intestines are supposed to have an enzyme called lactase. However, many people have intestines that do not make lactase, so they cannot break down the lactose into single sugars. Since the lactose cannot be absorbed in the upper intestines, it passes to the colon where bacteria ferment the double sugar, which can cause gas, cramping and diarrhea.

 

Read the entire piece and find out how the way we process foods can lead to obesity: http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/how-gut-bacteria-affect-weight.html

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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