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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ASTRAEA wrote:

@Epster - I meant unlabeled produce. I buy organic honey from a well known company.


@ASTRAEA Well, you are being scammed then, for there is virtually no such thing as organic honey. Bees travel sometimes 7 miles to forage. Unless your honey producer owns everything for over 7 miles in all directions of their hives, and it is organically managed land, they cannot call it organic. (Ask any small local honey producer: they'll tell you organic honey is almost always a labeling lie.)

 

Read this for the details: https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/compound-eye/organic-honey-is-a-sweet-illusion/

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@Epster - I meant unlabeled produce. I buy organic honey from a well known company.


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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ASTRAEA wrote:

@Epster - I went to the Belmar (small shore town ~ 10 miles north of me) farmers market with a friend, a few years ago. It was more fun as a "festival" on a nice day, than for serious shopping! I looked at some of their non-produce items .. like honey .. and felt they were overpriced; I don't need a cute bow on a jar! Another drawback is if you have a problem with something you buy, since many local farmers markets are only there once a week, and who'd remember exactly which seller you bought that item from!


@ASTRAEA Not clear if you are talking about returning the honey, but as a certified honey producer, I can tell you that it must be labled with producer contact data. This, of course, does not cover raw produce. 

 

One thing to know about store honey is that in recent years (as honeybees die out and honey becomes pricier) there have been verified cases of fraud. Sugar water has been sold as honey, et cetera. Store bought honey may have been pasturized, whereas local producer honey almost never has been. Local-to-you honey contains local pollen, which has been shown to help allergy sufferers defeat symptoms.

 

We believe in cultivating relationships with growers, so we buy from the same farmers every time. This way, if there is an issue, they are very happy to correct it. (That said, only once did we have an issue with a flat of tomatoes that had some rot) Also, they give us deals on things we buy in bulk (salsa canning heaven!) and even hold flats for us if we ask.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ASTRAEA wrote:

I don't need an "activity tracker" to tell me whether I'm moving or not, and I personally think it's ridiculous for people to include the steps they take shuffeling around the house, as "exercise". I'll drive my varous walking routes to get the mileage, and write them down .. I don't need a tracker after that.


In defense of activity trackers, and those who use them:

 

We are not all in the same health chapter. Some people have been given a harsh wake-up call via a health crisis and have been told to move it or lose it. Some people are 60 or more pounds overweight. I would not call measuring their daily movements --even if it is limited to walking around one's house-- ridiculous. Instead, I'd say it is a good beginning.

 

One of my relatives recently stated that she could not walk 500 feet without pain. She's morbidly obese. And yes, she is responsible for all that extra weight. But here she is. If she is to improve her health, she will have to deal with some amount of pain before it gets any better. But if she uses her activity tracker, and sees that just by getting up from the TV or computer every 20 minutes and walking around the house she can get a third of the recommended daily steps, she may come to see real improvement as possible (and escape from constant joint pain). The activity tracker absolutely has a place in this equasion. 

 

To anyone in a similar place: I salute your efforts. Keep taking those steps. And may your efforts bring you the desired results!

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@retiredtraveler Hear ya on the over-priced peanut butter. I worked with farmers markets back in the 80s: we were then trying to get local farmers to stop giving away their produce, to get them to see that they could ask near retail at these markets, that serious foodies and fresh food devotees were going to be thrilled to look the grower in the eye and for the opportunity to learn about preparation methods ... these days I sometimes think that idea has been taken too far :0) 

 

That said, fresh organic healthy fare is the one thing I'll open ye olde skinflint coffers for. Indeed, it's the only thing we both believe in going top shelf for. 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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We like the Farmer's market. We have one in town (we live in a semi-rural area), so easy to get to. It's the fruit and veggies that we're after. Definitely can get items like apples, old varieties, that are not in the store. I agree about some items not worth it. I purchased natural peanut butter once, cost twice what store-bought would be, and no difference. Of course, peanuts are not grown around here.

     


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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@Epster - I went to the Belmar (small shore town ~ 10 miles north of me) farmers market with a friend, a few years ago. It was more fun as a "festival" on a nice day, than for serious shopping! I looked at some of their non-produce items .. like honey .. and felt they were overpriced; I don't need a cute bow on a jar! Another drawback is if you have a problem with something you buy, since many local farmers markets are only there once a week, and who'd remember exactly which seller you bought that item from!


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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ASTRAEA I think the token system works smoothly.

 

Your local market sounds like heaven!  I'd be loyal to it as well!

 

There are a couple of farmers we know who sell at the markets, so our trips are in no small part to visit with them. Smiley Happy Besides I like taking in the festive atmosphere of farmer's markets.

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ Epster - The token idea sounds like a good one, but having to track 5 or 6 credit transactions for individual vendors, is still more of a PITA, than just paying once when I leave the farm market. This place has expanded over its 105 year operation, to have a bakery (50,000 pies sold for Thanksgiving!), specialty cheese shop, butcher, fish counter, hot & cold prepared foods, gourmet coffees & teas, sweets, a major custom gift basket section, and even a smoothie bar with a variety of protein powders near the exit: Delicious Orchards. I just buy produce .. but everything's tempting! Smiley Happy

 

I like paper grocery bags with handles, because they retain their shape if you set them down, unlike plastic or soft cloth bage. Shopping alone, it's easier to use a shopping cart, so I have my hands free.


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Re: Harvard Deems Activity Trackers, Farmers' Markets & Mindfulness Good Trends

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@ASTRAEA  One local farmer's market uses a token system: you go buy tokens (credit cards accepted) and turn them in for your items. Another of the local farmer's markets does not use the token system, but most the sellers accept credit cards.

 

One thing I've seen others do to solve the heavy burden issue is to take a personal hand cart or stroller and load that with fresh produce. We have taken to using reusable grocery bags at farmers markets because unlike the plastic versions growers tend to use, cloth bag handles don't cut so easily into one's fingers and forearms. (And you can hang them over a shoulder.) Besides, of course, the earth friendly aspect of the reusable bags.

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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