Know someone over 50 who is making a difference? Nominate them for the AARP Purpose Prize. Nominations close March 31!

Reply
Conversationalist
0
Kudos
459
Views

Re: Cycling for the Older Bicyclist

459 Views
Message 1 of 5
Thanks for the direction, I'll be sure to stay in touch
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
459
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
486
Views

Re: Cycling for the Older Bicyclist

486 Views
Message 2 of 5

Hey Bill, ( @BillontheBike) rather than email you, I'll just post a few links.

 

Of course there's wiki for general data and background (though this page all but ignores trikes): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recumbent_bicycle

 

This page will familarize you with the various makers and models: https://hostelshoppe.com/Recumbent-Recumbent-Trike/

 

This page will fill you in a bit on the ins and outs of recumbent trikes: https://www.bicycleman.com/about-recumbent-trikes/

 

And finally, if you are formulating questions, this forum is probably the busiest one. Members here will be able to answer your questions from engineering matters to how to get started. Ask and they'll regale you with laidback tales of incredible rides. Ask again and they may even post videos of said rides. Smiley Happy  http://www.bentrideronline.com/messageboard/index.php

 

 

And then there's me. I didn't pedal 11,000 miles without discovering a thing or two. Smiley Happy Ask away.

trikes at Arches.jpegA girl, her Jeep and her trike at Arches National Park.

 

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
486
Views
Conversationalist
1
Kudos
552
Views

Re: Cycling for the Older Bicyclist

552 Views
Message 3 of 5

11,000 miles - fantastic.  The recumbents do look a good alternative, I see one out on the road occasionally where I live.  I sit in a recumbent style at my exercise room when weather isn't too friendly; yes it is more comfortable.   I'd like to get an article together on them and post it on my website (and here to).  Any suggestions on where to go to find information -

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
552
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
568
Views

Re: Cycling for the Older Bicyclist

568 Views
Message 4 of 5

I think recumbent trikes are excellent choices for seniors, because they do not require one to balance, they are easy on the body (no neck, wrist, back or knee pain) and they are FUN! Smiley Happy

 

I started riding a recumbent trike three years ago as a way to rehab injured legs and feet. I've put on over 11,000 miles so far.

 

4 trikes at NE starting line.jpg

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
568
Views
Conversationalist
0
Kudos
577
Views
4
Replies

Cycling for the Older Bicyclist

577 Views
Message 5 of 5

Bicycling is a growing activity for senior adults. Whether you are just starting out or already riding, this article provides some useful tips and ideas on the bicycle and the ride for the older or senior adult. 

 

Before getting into the tips below, please visit my blog/website; you are welcome to comment, be an author (just email me and I'll set you up) like to connect with senior cyclists everywhere, add routes - search for a route to your liking, clubs and other helpful info.  Visit my site (click on) at: 

Bicyclesand.

   

 

Using the Bike that has been in my Garage Forever

 

Many of us have bikes that have been in storage or gathering dust in the garage. Before taking the bike out on the trail or road there are a number of steps I follow to ensure safety and enjoyment. For a bike that sits around for a long time you will often find the tires deflated, rust may have gathered, and pieces may have been damaged or shifted.  

 

Some useful pointers I do that could save you a headache later :

  • Check the safety reflectors and lights back and front of the bicycle, a bell is helpful, and a tire pump  or CO2 cartridge.  
  • Check tire pressure and inflate to the proper range; replace tires and tubes if very old due to increased risk of failure.


Pumping air in tiresBy Stougard - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

 

  • Check brakes for function and minimum thickness
  • Ensure bolts/nuts are tightened appropriately and handlebars and fenders (if any) are aligned.
  •  Check gears and shifting
  •  Lubricate the chain.
  •  If riding a long distance (can be short too) be ready to change a tire in the event of a blowout or know someone you can call to help out.
  • Check the weather forecast; don't turn your ride into a day you want to forget.
  • Health - be aware of your health and limitations; keep it fun

If you really don't want to hassle with doing this, a bike shop is a great place to go for that tuneup, most of them have the tools and fixtures to work on most bikes. Bike shops often have contact with bike groups that regularly go out on rides. Riding with riders of your skill level can be a great way to meet new friends and to help each other in the event of issues along the route.

 

Getting a New Bicycle - Selection Tips

 

Many of you may want to buy a new bike or Electric Bike right from the start. Here's a few tips and ideas that may be helpful for the senior adult bicycle rider. I don't know about you, but one area I found really critical was getting the best saddle (seat) that I could for my body style. Riding in the saddle for any length of time can become real uncomfortable in a hurry if it's the wrong fit. There are many really good saddles out


Be comfy

 

there and it is highly recommended consulting with a knowledgeable bike shop. Saddles can be replaced on most bikes and although it may cost some extra cash it could be well worth the investment.

 

Bike designs and weight have improved substantially over the years with some bikes being very light, many road bikes being under 20 lbs. Senior riders sure can benefit from the lighter bike if you are doing all the pedaling. Take a look at the bikes gearing, 10 speeds or more are common and offer a great way to deal with inclines.

 

For the rider that would like some assist, electric bike designs have made leaps and bounds in recent years. Battery designs often are integrated within the bike and the distance with one charge can be substantial. Some companies advertise 100+ miles per charge. My wife really likes using the electric bike in assist mode with her doing some pedaling and when we get to the hills putting full assist on.


Why notNothing like a challenge

 

If your out for casual rides, I found that sitting upright is pleasant on the back and arms. If you are into faster rides, as I tend do on my own, I make sure I've already had some preconditioning since the seat is quite high and body position low to reduce wind resistance.

 

Bikes with the wider and softer tires also help to keep the ride comfortable and gives less risk of damage due to road objects such as cracks and holes.

Some bikes have the full seat design and use a tri wheel, which may also offer great back support.

 

  My First Ride

 

One of the things that us senior riders need to be aware of is that balance tends to be more of an issue as we age. My wife and I often rode a few years back before I decided to train for an Ironman. Our bikes for casual riding didn't have the performance bike features and we fairly easily were able to ride without incident except sometimes losing balance somewhat at stops. Outfitted with safety helmet and gloves, we were quickly ready to hit the road and stop by one of our favorite restaurants.


Remember whenGenerations

 

Keep in mind that cars do not always see you, I always try to be on the defensive when riding as I know any accident will likely result in me being on the bad end of the incident. Each state has it's own laws and regulations regarding cyclists, please familiarize yourself beforehand.

 

After I purchased my performance bike for the 112-mile Ironman ride and started training, what a difference. Those bike shoes (with clipons) need to be set right, otherwise you can end doing what I did early on - falling down. The young riders could stand still and stay upright. Me, no way. My balance isn't there and even though I have the clipons mastered now I still have to take extra care when slowing and stopping to keep the balance before putting the foot down.

 

Stay Hydrated

 

As we age, the long and hard rides take a toll on the body. One thing that has happened with me is that I tend to cramp much easier than when younger. Living in a hot climate I take supplements such as electrolytes and salts before, during, and after the ride to minimize onset of cramps. On casual rides this thankfully doesn't happen. I do stretch, but not enough. There are several published articles out there on stretching, hydrating and supplements.

 

Lightweight bike accessories on the market are plentiful, and those extra holders for water bottles, saddle bags and body straps for phones, IDs, money and food supplements are great if your out on a long ride or just want to make several stops on a short ride and enjoy. Small specialized bike tool kits are readily available as are CO2 cartridges.

 

To Sum it Up

 

Seniors, if you have the opportunity put bicycling in your schedule. Doesn't matter if you haven't ridden in years of if you just want to get out for short rides. There is a bike out there just for you and nothing compared to a light breeze in your face and those pleasant stops along the way to enjoy nature of that stop you never made in your car.

 

 

 

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
577
Views
4
Replies