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Re: AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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Like they say in the Marines, pain is a symptom of losing weakness!

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Re: AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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No pain no gain. The trick is knowing HOW much pain equals gain. That's an individual thing.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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I never know that I've exercised too much until the next day.  Then the muscles scream like crazy and I can barely move.  I've learned to cut the exercise in half when I do that much damage.  All I can say is that I learn from experience.

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Re: AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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I've been involved in both strength and cardio exercise for roughly 40 years...mostly on my own (no classes or trainers). Now at age 70, pain is something that I've learned to avoid while exercising. The last time I encountered pain with a strength exercise (bench press about 3 years ago), I strained the rotar cuff in my right shoulder and have never totally recovered (after an MRI, physical therapy, etc.). At my age, experiencing pain while exercising means to me that I am damaging part of my body.

 

On occasion I will still push myself to near exhaustion, particularly with a cardio workout, but that's totally different from pain. Years ago pushing myself to exhaustion (both strenght and cardio conditioning) was something that meant I was having an optimal workout.

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Re: AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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This isn't an easy question to answer. I mean, pain management is individual. I can take a lot of pain, apparently. I refused pain meds after my hysterectomy, for instance. And I climbed mountains for a year on torn toe ligaments. Actually, I just kept tearing those ligaments week after week while climbing 14,000 ft mountains.

 

So I don't want anyone to adopt my approach to pain management, but here's what I do: while lifting weights or working out in the gym I listen closely to pain messages, but when I'm hiking or cycling, I tell whatever body part that's sending pain messages to my brain to just shut up. And I hike or bike to wherever it is I'm going. 

 

Please note I carry herbal pain relief formulas with me, and use a muscle cream on my knees before heading out for a 75 mile ride, too. Smiley Happy

 

But my bottom line regarding pain while working out is this: pain is not to be avoided, it is to be embraced and used to improve oneself. The right kind of pain is a sign that your workout is, er, working. So, back to the listening closely to the pain messages when I'm working out: I'll do a floor exercise until it is painful. And then I'll do some more. Smiley Happy

 

 

Disclaimer: I'm a 59 y-o senior athlete who is in excellent shape. It is not my intention to tell a severe fibromyalgia sufferer to get up and walk 10 miles.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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AARP Expert Denise Austin – Week 6: How do you gauge pain? When is it too much?

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We are now 6 weeks into the AARP Fit & Fun Health Challenge, if you haven't entered you still can! Click here.

 

It is important to understand pain and know when it is too much and unmanageable. How do you determine your pain level? How do you manage pain?

 

AARPTeri
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