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Message 41 of 264

Plan out menus and buy staples that can be used for different dishes.   Trying to stock up for 2 weeks at a time to reduce trips out.  Also utilizing pickup for stores that offer (Kroger, Sam's Club) to reduce over exposure.

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Message 42 of 264

When I go into the store, I put my debit card, car keys and store card in a ziploc baggie( phone too if it has my list). I don't bring my purse in. This cuts down on my personal items being exposed unnecessarily 

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Message 43 of 264

When I go grocery shopping, I go up and down Isles that have less people. I say: Good morning, how's your day going and continue shopping.

 

Then I get in the shortest lines staying 6ft apart from the customers while waiting for My turn to check out. 

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Message 44 of 264

I just went to the store yesterday. I plan my meals out according to what is on sale. I portion my chicken and hamburger out. Then I freeze each portion. I only buy produce that I can incorprate into different meals so that there is no waste. For instance I will use peppers in a stir fry then use the other half to top a homemade pizza. I cut boneless chicken breast in half, they cook faster, go farther. I also make chicken pieces for a quick chicken & vegetable pasta sometimes using leftover peppers, broccoli. Pasta is quick and inexpensive. No meat dinners are easy and so good. Those pre-made hamburger patties are really good after a few days of veggie dinners. Planning your menu out BEFORE you go to the store will save money and waste. I have only been going to the store about every eight days. WASHING MY HANDS BEFORE AND AFTER. ALWAYS WASH your produce and wipe off the packaged meat if not portioning them in different containers. Stay safe.

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Message 45 of 264

Don't be afraid to ask people to give you some room if they act like they've been living in a cave for the last month and a half and have seen absolutely no news regarding the pandemic and choose to ignore social distancing, especially in checkout lines. Most of the time they apologize and back up. The one time I started to get some attitude, I used a little white lie and whispered to the offending party, "Ordinarily, I wouldn't mind, but I may still be contagious."  Got plenty of room, then!  (Although I pre-empted any further trouble by letting the cashier in on it when she was checking me out.)

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Message 46 of 264
I set aside the bags but don't toss them. This works if you have a trunk or garage to place the bags for a few days, untouched.
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Message 47 of 264

I've been encouraging my grocery store to set up space for a small-ish number of goods, where customers order what they want at the counter.  All the day's offerings are stacked behind the counter. This would be safer for employees, because customers do not walk behind the counter. They don't need to worry about catching the virus from customers spreading the virus in their work space. It would be safer for customers, too.  And they could offer items that are more nutritious  than what someone would find at a convenience store.  

 

Today I saw there's a store in Palmetto, FL that opened a "drive-thru" that works like that. Every day they post 100 items that customers can buy at the drive-thru (first come, first-serve).  Customers fill out their paper order form, hand it to the employee, and get their items within 5-8 minutes. It's different from regular pick-up, where an employee may spend a couple of minutes, just trying to find the right flavor, brand, or size of any item from soap to spices.  

 

Customers could still go into the store or use delivery services or pick-up services.  But for now, if a shopper only needs apples, aspirin and tissues, they could do it more safely.

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Message 48 of 264

I try to stock up on what I know I'll need and have groceries delivered sometimes. When I go to the store I put neosporin in my nose just to coat the mucous membranes and I wear a mask and practice safe 6-10 ft distancing. I'm not shy about asking someone to move away from me. When I go into the store I always wipe the cart down and when I leave I use hand sanitizer and make sure I wipe down with alcohol any of my possessions such as glasses, phone etc...that I may have touched while I was in the store. I also wash cans and plastic items from the store with soap and water before using them. 

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Message 49 of 264

I consider the no frills stores like Aldis much safer. The boxes are put on the shelf in bulk so much less touching happens all around. The cart issue seems to be questionable. I really wish this whole plastic ban could be put on hold for now. Those were the cleanest options for cashiers and consumers at this point. 

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Message 50 of 264

Eat a colorful diet of fruits and vegetables to satay healthy!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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