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Off-the-Beaten-Path Travel

Where is the most unique or remote place that you've been? Perhaps you've traveled to some place that doesn't get many tourists or that most people don't know about. If so, how did you hear about it, and what made you decide to go? What did you think about it?

 

What "hidden gem" destination do you most want to visit in the future?

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Social Butterfly

My oh my 💞

Thanks so much to all of you for sharing.... too many to recognize with @ but Thanks I loved reading your tales and the pictures just gorgeous 

Makes me feel like taking an excursion... though I kinda did with your stories I love the history and all WOW

As a child anytime we were traveling my parents and 2 brothers and sister I was oldest but I always made my dad pull off at every historical marker... lots in Texas... to read even though I called them hysterical markers Was great learning about it all... My parents loved pig trailing off beaten paths we'd find great wonders at times 

I so love GPS these days cause can just drive and go off anywhere no worries of getting lost ... just go along your own way finding and discovering all kinds of things 

Thanks again for sharing 

Y'all have lived some lovely adventures 

Ginger  : ) 

🙂 Smile & the world Smiles with you 😉 Pass one on....its free
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Esteemed Social Butterfly


@gm5271 wrote:

My oh my 💞

Thanks so much to all of you for sharing.... too many to recognize with @ but Thanks I loved reading your tales and the pictures just gorgeous 

Makes me feel like taking an excursion... though I kinda did with your stories I love the history and all WOW

As a child anytime we were traveling my parents and 2 brothers and sister I was oldest but I always made my dad pull off at every historical marker... lots in Texas... to read even though I called them hysterical markers Was great learning about it all... My parents loved pig trailing off beaten paths we'd find great wonders at times 

I so love GPS these days cause can just drive and go off anywhere no worries of getting lost ... just go along your own way finding and discovering all kinds of things 

Thanks again for sharing 

Y'all have lived some lovely adventures 

Ginger  : ) 


I had to laugh because like you Ginger, I was the oldest with one sister and two brothers and we grew up as Army brats.  Every weekend my father would take us on an adventure or excursion to some historic site or battlefield or other interesting locale and since we moved around a lot, we visited many cool places, in the States and overseas. My mother got tired of always going to forts and battlefields, but we kids loved it.

 

I often say I'm reliving my second childhood since I love exploring historical sites, and out-of-the-way places.  To this day, I will pull off if I see a historical marker or monument or abandoned building..

Social Butterfly

@MsStretch 

Oh my MsStretch that's absolutely amazing

I constantly am blown away by the things many of us have in common on this community truly a blessing 

I too still stop & want to see those things 

While I lived on Oak Island for 2 years few years ago my kids came to visit I took us 7 on Ferry ride to visit Bald Head Island only accessible by boat or ferry and no cars allowed there Million$$ homes there & old Lighthouse but I wanted to see 300 year old Tree drove my youngest son crazy he was driving our golfcart trying to find it but find it we did and was so worth it to me My oldest took picture of me in hollow part after I checked for hornets 

I love nature and history 

Thanks for sharing made my day 

Ginger  : ) 

Me inside 300year tree bottom was over 8ft wideMe inside 300year tree bottom was over 8ft wide

🙂 Smile & the world Smiles with you 😉 Pass one on....its free
Esteemed Social Butterfly

@gm5271 

Now that's what I'm talking about.  I'm sure most people visit Bald Head Island to see the lighthouse or sea turtles or the beaches, but you were on a quest to see a tree and MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.  Love the picture.  I clearly see the thrill of victory on your face!  Woman LOL

 

Speaking of trees, during the sesquicentennial of the Civil War, a like-minded friend (she is also my bushwhacking partner) and I went to the town of Orange, VA to watch a reenactment of a skirmish in the streets. Gen. R. Lee and his Confederate army retreated to Orange after Gettysburg and encamped for the winter.  After the skirmish, we decided to do the self-guiding walking tour of Orange (best way to see a town, walk it; see so much more and learn more than if you  just drive through).  Supposedly, the very tree Gen. Lee had tied his horse, Traveller, while attending services in church was still standing and if we found or saw nothing else, we were going to see that tree.  We found the church and sure enough, there it stood in all its glory -- Lee's TREE.  There was a small plaque identifying it.  One of the highlights of our Orange adventure.  Woman Wink

 

 

Gen. R. E. Lee tied Traveller to this very tree when attending services in the church, part of which can be seen over the bush on the right, during the winter of !863-64,Gen. R. E. Lee tied Traveller to this very tree when attending services in the church, part of which can be seen over the bush on the right, during the winter of !863-64,

 

Esteemed Social Butterfly

@TerryM939465 and @JoshuaM965487

I am mesmerized by your pictures and descriptions, especially Boswell Gulch, since forgotten, abandoned places from the past fascinate me.

 

One of my favorite winter activities is bushwhacking in Shenandoah NP.  SNP was home to hundreds of mountaineers in the Blue Ridge of VA before it became a national park.  All of the residents had to leave, either voluntarily relocated or forcibly evicted during the late '20s/early '30s.

 

Today, remnants of their homes, artifacts and over 100 cemeteries still exist within the Park's boundaries although Mother Nature has reclaimed her land and many of them are not easily accessible, the log walls and fences rotted away or claimed by forest fires, far off the trail and the beaten path.  Many require arduous treks through dense underbrush and up and down steep ridges.

 

Many times I have fought through skin-shredding, clothes-ripping greenbrier and scrambled over & crawled under fallen trees and boulders, huffed up steep ascents, slid down steep descents on my butt, and wondered, "And why do I like this?", but there is a certain awe in discovering a still-standing chimney deep in the woods, the rusted parts of an old woodstove or car, a plot of crudely inscribed fieldstones.  Places that have not seen visitors for years.  Like @TerryM939465 I imagine what life was like in what often appears as inhospitable, but beautiful surroundings. I always silently thank the residents of the old family cemeteries for allowing me to intrude.

 

I became fascinated with this part of SNP history when I worked at Skyland in the early 2000s and  almost 2 decades later, I still return every winter to further explore.  There are no maps or signs or guides to these places, so I rely on NPS land records, oral histories, old USGS maps, hand drawn maps and word-of-mouth from past 'explorers' and hikers, following old faint road traces, and a whole lotta luck.

Hocking Hills, Ohio

We found out about this place through a pamphlet at AAA years ago.  Coincidentally my brother had already been there.  

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Conversationalist

I went to Tonga, the Friendly Islands, which is the most beautiful place in the world!  The People are so friendly, if you treat them with utmost respect.

My husband was born there.

The food was out of this world, everything is fresh.  My father in law asked me if I would like steak and I said yes.  He took me to a government building where a cow was just butchered and asked me which part I would like. What? Well, I did ask for steak.

I was living on the main island, Tongatapu, and Tonga has 52 islands and governed by a King. Everything is shut down on Sunday except the bakery and churches, and the police station.  The bakery is for those that can't cook so it's a means to have food. You can't go swimming, either, it's against the Law on Sunday, it's a day of rest. You can get arrested and yes, tourists do. So, remember your in a foreign country and must obey their laws, not your own. 

They have a wonderful bus system as well. Most of the kids speak English because of school, so if your lost, just ask.

If your an explorer, just take The Kings Ferry, it's a beautiful ferry that goes to other islands and it's reasonable, cheaper than flying.  But, if you really want to go on an adventure, take a fishing boat, and tour the smaller islands and see coral and the bottom of the sea.  It's breathtaking!  

Tonga to me, is a place going back in time and never wanting to leave!

 

Honored Social Butterfly

As soon as I saw this topic I thought of Davisboro, GA.  It doesn't even appear on some maps.

 

I was there many years ago for a Fourth of July Celebration at which a candidate for State Senator was going to speak.  My husband, as new kid on the block, was the one on duty at the TV station for the holiday.  It seemed a good outting for a news story and a way to spend the day.  There was no photographer available so I went to film.  I had only worked the camera once before.

 

It turned out to be one of those many towns in the country that was active in the days of the railroad, but was skipped by the freeway system.  The town Bar-b-que was held in what was once the town grocery store, but was long ago closed.  The windows were broken out but it provided cover in case of rain.  There was no rain and it was very hot, even though some fans had been set up.  I was glad to go back outside to eat under a nice tree.  From the sidewalk in front of the store I could see the deserted train track, the station covered in kudzu and the ruins of what had once been a factory of some kind.  It was the closest thing to a ghost town that I have ever seen.

 

There were about 50 adults there which I think were all the residents of the town, maybe the entire county.  I didn't count the children but they didn't out-number the adults.  The adults were super friendly and so impressed that there was going to be TV coverage.  That might have been a first for them.  Each one of them wanted to appear on camera and we managed to film most of them and didn't have the heart to tell them they would not appear in the finished news story.  I don't even remember who the candidate was but I certainly remember the people and the abudance of food we ate that day.

Contributor

Dad’s family grew up there and they ran the grocery store mentioned in this story until it moved up to the main road between Louisville and Sandersville.  HUGE peach farm just outside of town, good pickin and eating!  Would have thought more people might be around since there is also a prison just outside of town!

Periodic Contributor

A really cool place to visit when the weather isn't too hot is the China Ranch Date Farm (https://www.chinaranch.com/).  It is definiately off the beaten path, located near Tecopa, California in the Mojave Desert.  There is hiking, and of course the date farm - it's an oasis in the desert.  There is a store where you can purchase a variety of dates, the date cookies are bombalicious as well as the shakes..  I like to visit the nearby hotsprings, usually during the winter (https://www.delightshotspringsresort.com/en-us).  This too is off the beaten path, with amazing therapeutic mineral hotsprings, a small motel, cabins and an RV park - it's all rustic, and a great get-away for adults (no kids allowed at this location).  Tecopa Brewing Company is a recent addition to the area and provides a simple BBQ menu (https://www.facebook.com/TecopaBrewingCo).  This is a nice addition, since I remember when I had to pack a pic-nic and cooler when I would stay at the hotsprings..  Best time to go is October through March when the weather is cooler.. Enjoy!!

Periodic Contributor

The Hoyt House in Staatsburg, New York located in the NY State Park of Norrie Point/Mills Mansion. The house was designed by famed architect Calvert Vaux in 1855 for the wealthy merchant Lydig Monson-Hoyt and his wife Geraldine Livingston. It was known as "The Point" and the designs for the house can be found in Vaux's book on cottages and villas. The Hoyt estate was designed as a wonderland of natural beauty where guests in their carriages were brought in through modest stone gates, over a wooden bridge, to then wind their way along a path through gardens and brooks to reach the house. In 1963 the land was taken by the state of New York citing eminent domain and the Hoyt family was forced to leave. Afterwards, the house and surrounding buildings began to decay. There is an initiative underway presently to save the house and restore it to its former beauty. 

 

The Hoyt House is spectacular even in ruin and so are the other buildings of the estate still standing. One may visit it either through the paths that run into the woods from Mills Mansion (also known as Staatsburgh) to the north or Norrie Point Park to the south. Staatsburg Village is accessible off US Route 9. If you go to Norrie Point Park, follow the road up from Old Post until you reach "the triangle" area where you can drive down to the river and the gazebo area. Park the car by the green wooden gate you'll see on your right and go down that path. At the fork in the path, after you've passed the magnificent ruin of a stone building on your left, go left. You can't miss it. It's a lovely walk any time of the year. Not handicapped accessible by any means but certainly doable if you walk with a cane as I often do. Highly recommended as is Mills Mansion. If you're in the area and like a walk with some history, this spot is for you. Hoyt House, Staatsburg NY, WinterHoyt House, Staatsburg NY, WinterHoyt House front, Staatsburg NY, SpringHoyt House front, Staatsburg NY, SpringHoyt House, Staatsburg NY, from the eastHoyt House, Staatsburg NY, from the eastHoyt House, Staatsburg NYHoyt House, Staatsburg NY

Newbie

Unique?  Remote?  There are many paths in Lake County, Colorado that fit that discription.  Trails really.  The first that came to mind when reading this discussion was Boswell Gulch.  A truely magic place.  I hiked there, and the area surrounding several times.  I liked to imagine the people who toiled there over a hundred years ago.  Scraping and clawing a meger living from beneath and upon the ground.  Wrenching nuggets of precious metals from the rock and creek beds.  Bent on striking it rich.  Few ever did.  I try to imagine the smells, the sounds; the warmth of the summers.  And the bitter, bone chilling cold of the winters.  No one goes there now.  The over grown trail is intermittant.  Yet I am surrounded by what once was. DSCN0426 (1).JPGDSCN0428 (1).JPGDSCN0431 (1).JPGDSCN0424 (1).JPG

Contributor

Darrien, GA

 

Within 15 minutes from I95. Great stopover if driving from/to FL.

 

Eat at Skippers Fry Camp right on the water. Great sunsets and fried alligator tails.

 

Stay at Dockside Inn or Darrien Waterfront BnB.

Dont miss the great wine bar in the back of wine store on Broad Street.

And the smallest Church in the US is nearby. An Englih fort, an old rice plantation  another historical house as well as an art gallery in an old jail grounds out a nice visit.

 

Newbie

Domremy, France was my off-the-beaten-path travel. It is home to Joan of Arc and it has the 600-year-old house she lived in available tour. The area of France is called “La France Profonde” which in English means “The Deep France” and you better bring a French translation book with you. Joan of Arc is the patron saint of France and they built a massive Basilica in honor of her which is up on a hill overlooking the town of Domremy. I still think of this pilgrimage today and the unique experience I had with visiting this quiet little town in the rolling hills of France.Heart

 

Please note: The picture of Joan of Arc is a statue of her for her sightings and intervention at the Battle of the Marne in World War I. She is the patron saint of France and even Winston Churchill was so impressed with her he wrote a quote about her. But Domremy is totally unique and it was her childhood home. So she lives on in the hearts and minds of mankind to this day. 

 

"Joan was a being so uplifted from the ordinary run of mankind that she finds no equal in a thousand years."
Winston Churchill-Legendary British Prime Minister in WWII Joan of Arc statue dedicated to her intervention in the Battle of the Marne in World War I.Joan of Arc statue dedicated to her intervention in the Battle of the Marne in World War I.

Trusted Contributor

gravity hill , bedford co. pa. is certainly unique,check it out on line. and if you get a chance to go there the 911 memorial (pa crash site) is close by. it's something you dont soon forget.

Contributor

One of the most unusual places I've visited is the Museum of Leprosy in Bergen, Norway! I had always considered Leprosy a tropical disease & was surprised that it has existed in parts of Scandinavia for generations. It was fascinating to read reports of early medical treatments & potential causes. This is a relatively small museum which is easily visited in a couple of hours.

Honored Social Butterfly

I can't really name any 'hidden gems'. We've not been anyplace that was really 'remote'. But, we're 'hard core' day hikers, so our trips mean getting on trails, mostly in national parks, that very few people get on due to difficulty of the hikes (8-10 miles total, 2000-3500 foot elevation gain/loss). 

   So, in that sense, we're off the 'beaten path' and see sites up in the mountains that relatively few people experience.


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