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Conversationalist

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

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Message 11 of 23

Guilty as charged. It's a one-person office and that would be me! I don't mind too much since I do love my job.

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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

5,977 Views
Message 12 of 23

I worked for a public utility & they'd only give you one quarter into the new year, to "use it or lose it", as far as vacation! As a single, I already "lost" vacation days, when I had to stay home for tradesmen to do repairs, so you can be sure I wasn't about to lose more of my hard-earned vacation time, due to oversight! On rare occasion there would be big projects where even management would work so much overtime, it couldn't be considered "expected", and I'd take that time off ASAP .. in case the company then changed its mind! Smiley Happy


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Silver Conversationalist

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

6,936 Views
Message 13 of 23

In a way I lost some actual vacation but never the pay for it.  My previous company would let us carry a max of two years worth of vacation on the books.  As a young married couple we would use 2 weeks vacation every other a year to visit our families in middle America from the West Coast.  The trip was expensive but we kept the inbetween years vacation days for emergencies like funerals, sick kids, etc.  As my vacation accural increased to three weeks per year, I was carrying 6 weeks on the books consistently.  When I left the mega-corporation to be the first hired employee of a new company, I was paid for the vacation and took 2 weeks off before starting the new job.  So essentially, I left 4 weeks vacation on the table.  That was 27 years ago and since then I haven't missed taking any time off.  Now that I can walk out the door retired any time I want, I take all my vacation time and then some.  I don't ask to take time off anymore.  I tell them what days I won't be working which lately has exceeded my vacation days by 5 weeks or more per year.  Let's just say I'm easing into retirement slowly by taking more and more vacation.

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Info Seeker

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

7,047 Views
Message 14 of 23

Yes, consistently.  It was made clear that you should only request vacation at certain times of year.  Not during summer when it was fiscal year budget season. As a spouse of a teacher, this was pretty much the only option. You were looked upon as a slacker if you requested vacation. And you had to make sure you covered for everything that could potentially happen while you were gone, because management didn't want any questions/surprises to deal with. One manager told me that she "lost" vacation days and it was expected that I would as well.  She, of course, did not lose any. I was in my 50's and new about age discrimination, which eventually caught up with me. The wrath when you returned from even a day off wasn't worth it, as I had to work an 60-70 hour week to make up for lost time. After 30+ years as a worker bee, I had had lots of earned vacation, but it was easier just to lose it.

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Super Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

7,073 Views
Message 15 of 23

I never missed a vacation day and never would.  Employers love this activity so why give them the pleasure.  They will take advantage of you as much as possible.  I even took some days I wasn't entitled to, on the sly.

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Info Seeker

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

6,888 Views
Message 16 of 23

Worked for same company for almost 30 yrs & at first it was a use it or lose it policy, so I used it & had no regrets.  Later we were able to  sell back up to week of vacation time which I took advantage of since this option came during the Christmas shopping period.

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Trusted Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

7,341 Views
Message 17 of 23

"...Just don't get it.  I take my vacations!!...".

 

I recall discussing this, water-cooler kind of stuff, when in corporate. Anecdotally, there was a bit of everything. Some people just didn't have an interest -- beyond me, but not everyone wants to travel or even, just stay home. Some people did feel pressured --- if they took time off, they would be 'looked down' upon. I only saw that in one place that was pretty much of a 'sweat shop'. Other places I worked had decent management who encouraged people to take time off.

  Some people claimed it was just too expensive, and didn't want a 'staycation'. DW and I were hard-core savers, but we could afford to go tent camping, which we did, for years, using our vacation days. That is, it just didn't cost much to do that. Of course, tent camping is not most peoples first choice!

   Apparently, some people just did not have a life away from work.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

5,589 Views
Message 18 of 23

AARPLynne wrote:

By now, it’s almost a cliché to point out what a terrible job Americans do at relaxing. But it’s worth taking a closer look at the latest numbers: Glassdoor reports that the average U.S. employee who gets paid vacation only uses half of it. (Okay, 51% if you want to be precise.) And while on vacation, 61% admit to doing at least a little work, including checking email and phoning in. More...

 

Have you ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?


That is a crazy statistic.  I wonder what the various reasons would be.  Do they feel pressured by their employer?  Feel (mistakenly) that they cannot be replaced and have to do it all.   Just don't get it.  I take my vacations!!

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

5,142 Views
Message 19 of 23

AARPLynne wrote:

By now, it’s almost a cliché to point out what a terrible job Americans do at relaxing. But it’s worth taking a closer look at the latest numbers: Glassdoor reports that the average U.S. employee who gets paid vacation only uses half of it. (Okay, 51% if you want to be precise.) And while on vacation, 61% admit to doing at least a little work, including checking email and phoning in. More...

 

Have you ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?


We have been the worst. The WORST at taking vacations. We even put off our honeymoon for a year so we could save the money.

 

This workworkwork thing has mostly been my fault. In my defense (I know this is defenseless, but humor me) I never worked for anyone but myself, so managed to tether myself to my work. Federal holidays were the best work days because the phone didn't ring and I could have quiet time to think.

 

DH suggested a few years back that I stop working and learn to relax ahead of retirement. That man is so wise.  

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Ever been guilty of leaving vacation days on the table?

4,753 Views
Message 20 of 23

Most places I’ve ever worked in private industry always had the rule use it or lose it. They awarded you vacation hours sometime during the year and you had to use them up within the year. Which was no problem I always used those hours up and I bet they never missed me either.

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