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AARP Expedia

BEWARE!  Do not use AARP to make travel arrangements. I wish I had read this forum prior to making a reservation through AARP Travel.

 

I made a reservation through AARP Travel Center for one night in a hotel room in Asheville in August, 2019.  When I received my credit card bill, I was not only charged for my hotel room in Asheville, but also for someone else's (someone I don't know) hotel room in Denver, Colorado.  When I called to request a refund, I was told that they couldn't refund my money!  I have spent countless hours on the phone with AARP and Expedia.  AARP says there is nothing they can do since Expedia is a third party and they will have to refund the money. Expedia is saying they can't refund my money.  At first they blamed the hotel where I stayed, but when I disputed the charge with my credit card company, they received a response from AARP Travel that they coudn't refund the $ because it was for a hotel room in Denver for another AARP member.  Then they blamed Hotels.com so I spent more time on the phone with them.  They coudln't talk to me since I didn't have the security word on the account of the person who made the Denver reservation.  Since I wasn't the person who made the reservation, I couldn't give them the security word.  Then someone finally told me that it was actually Expedia AARP who I needed to speak with.  When I called back to Expedia AARP, I was told that the person would be fired if he refunded my $$.  Instead  he could give me a coupon I could use for another hotel booking.  When I tried to use the coupon, I was told I couldn't use it because the bill needed to be over the coupon amount.  It was a $200 coupon and the charge needed to be at least $250.00.

 

I would NEVER use AARP again to make travel arrangements again, and I will not renew my AARP membership when it expires.

 

Honored Social Butterfly

".....I would NEVER use AARP again to make travel arrangements again, and I will not renew my AARP membership when it expires......".

 

I have never understood why anyone uses the various travel websites. There are too many 'middlemen' involved. We travel fairly extensively, for years, and we direct book everything. I go to the hotel(s) website and get their confirmation(s), ditto on the plane. I use a specific CC for booking travel, so if anything goes awry, I deal  with the CC people.

   Once everything is booked, I compose an itinerary in Word and print out the emails from the hotels/planes.  

    I assume that there is some kind of discount involved with using travel websites, but to me, it's not worth it.


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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Exactly.

 

I often use Expedia to get an idea of what's available for hotels where I am going but then I generally book directly through the hotel. Often they guarantee that the rate I get is their best rate (at the time) for any internet booking. And generally there are perks to booking directly with them as well...free internet, upgraded room, etc. 

 

I book with airlines and rental cars the same way. A few times I've been presented at checkout with some affiiliated offer such as a discount on a rental or hotel; sometimes I check these out and a handful of times they've been worthwhile but most often not.

 

I also use Google Flights (www.google.com/flights) to search for flights and compare fares, etc.

 

We have bundled sometimes in the past with hotel/air fare/ rental car through Expedia, etc, and come out okay but I don't even think of it anymore.

 

 


@retiredtraveler wrote:

".....I would NEVER use AARP again to make travel arrangements again, and I will not renew my AARP membership when it expires......".

 

I have never understood why anyone uses the various travel websites. There are too many 'middlemen' involved. We travel fairly extensively, for years, and we direct book everything. I go to the hotel(s) website and get their confirmation(s), ditto on the plane. I use a specific CC for booking travel, so if anything goes awry, I deal  with the CC people.

   Once everything is booked, I compose an itinerary in Word and print out the emails from the hotels/planes.  

    I assume that there is some kind of discount involved with using travel websites, but to me, it's not worth it.


 

Silver Conversationalist

@DorothyR256080 

 

Sounds nutso. Everyone is giving you the runaround.

 

You need to go back to your credit card company and dispute that charge (don't accept any coupons or other malarkey from the other parties).

 

AARP told your credit card company that the charge was for a different person ("when I disputed the charge with my credit card company, they received a response from AARP Travel that they coudn't refund the $ because it was for a hotel room in Denver for another AARP member"), so there ya' go, it's not your charge.

 

Hold your credit card company's feet to the fire about this, the vendor (AARP Expedia or whoever) charged you for a different party...the vendor admitted this to your credit card company. Whatever happens at the vendor (AARP Expedia or whoever the heck this is) is not your problem or your credit card company's problem.

 

Contact your credit card fraud department and keep disputing this charge.

 

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@DorothyR256080 

 

Be sure to contact your credit card's fraud department. And use the word "fraud" liberally with zesto.

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I don't want to get the person whose charge showed up on my credit card in trouble so I don't want to accuse her of fraud.  I know this is an Expedia problem.  The response from my bank had the phone number and email address of the person whose room I paid for.  I called her and she thought I was trying to defraud her.  Then she offered to send me the money for the room but I declined.  This is an Expedia problem.  I sent another letter to the bank and am waiting for a resolution on my 2nd dispute since I lost my first dispute.  

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I can't even imagine why your credit card company provided you with the name/number of the "other party". Myself, I wouldn't even have called them. This is an "AARP/Expedia" faulty charge transaction and, in my view, there's no point in dealing with anyone other than your credit card bank, they have already confirmed to you that the charge was for another party...so they (your credit card bank) needs to reverse that charge with "AARP/Expedia".

 

Whoever (from Expedia) was telling you that they couldn't reverse that charge without "getting someone into trouble or losing their job" is full of smoke, that's not your problem and it likely isn't true anyway. Ignore everyone else, it's not your problem, just continue with your credit card bank. Unless you've already accepted the "coupon", then that would unfortunately muddy the situation.

 

But in the future, don't worry about all those other clowns, just deal with your credit card bank.

 

 


@DorothyR256080 wrote:

I don't want to get the person whose charge showed up on my credit card in trouble so I don't want to accuse her of fraud.  I know this is an Expedia problem.  The response from my bank had the phone number and email address of the person whose room I paid for.  I called her and she thought I was trying to defraud her.  Then she offered to send me the money for the room but I declined.  This is an Expedia problem.  I sent another letter to the bank and am waiting for a resolution on my 2nd dispute since I lost my first dispute.  


 

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