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There is a law that will not allow you to be cremated after death if you have no living relatives.

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There is a law that will not allow you to be cremated after death if you have no living relatives.

I've been told by a lawyer and a funeral director that all cremations need to be signed for by a near relative or by a friend that has signed and sworn to your wishes while you are alive.  This form must be notarized.  In order for the signed affidavit to be considered lawful, you must pre-decease the friend.  A will or notarized letter with your wishes is not valid in this instance.  A power of attorney is also not going to help in this situation.  Does anyone know how this law came to be?  When was this law enacted?  Is there someone or some group that I can bring this problem to?  I'm trying to pre-pay my funeral expenses.  I've been stopped in my tracks by this problem.  Any ideas?

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Conversationalist

WHAT?? Ridiculous!

So, if you cannot be cremated because you don't have a notarized person to sign for the fire; then what? Do they throw you out to the buzzards or haul you off to the landfill?

Ridiculous!

I have a small burial /life insurance policy and my best friend will...hopefully use it for my cremation; a simple, in a box, I go.....then sent to my girls kind of thing.

What a stupid law

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Regular Contributor

I live in NJ and this is the first time I'm hearing about this.  My sister's boyfriend passed away last month (Nov 2022) and she had him cremated.  Funeral director did not require a notarized document.  Could it possibly be a State law and therefore only applies to residents of your state?

 

Barbara

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Honored Social Butterfly

Then there is always this:

KHN 10/24/2022 - Listen: How Does Human Composting Work?

. . . . a new California law that will allow “human composting” as an alternative to burial and cremation.  This is the 5th state that has such a law.

 

 

 

more details at the link

It's Always Something . . . . Roseanna Roseannadanna
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Regular Social Butterfly

Not sure what this applies to; 15+ years ago I signed body donation > cremation > ashes to diamonds forms, with specific eol directives; the diamonds are for daughters, if they choose to accept.

 

I'd check here: Science Care - Body donation overview 

 

Then here, if interested: LifeGem 

 

I opted for these choices following 9/11. I researched then, and updated as changes were made in laws.

 

One of the main reasons I chose these options was I did not want daughters to spend time at the cemetery "speaking" with me, as I had more than 20 years of doing with my dad...

 

Please know you are doing the best thing for your family, no matter what you choose! Good on you! Proud to know you!

 

#StaySafe


#VegasStrong
Phil Harris, actor and showman, to John Fogerty of CCR: “If I’d known I’d live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.”
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Honored Social Butterfly

Your state should have all the specifics for you - they are the ruling body in this instance.

Here is some general info for you -

VeryWellHealth.com - End of Life Concerns - What Happens to Unclaimed Cremated Remains

 

 

 

It's Always Something . . . . Roseanna Roseannadanna
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