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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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@aruzinsky

 

You might be right about this specific new med - it is hard for me to tell based on how the FDA worded the new classification or how the pharma company described its origins.  

HEMP Industrial Daily - DEA takes CBD off Schedule 1 with FDA's approval

 

However, with other meds being developed in the pipeline, the % of THC in some of these new medical compounds may have to be higher - thus competing with the same recreational type of cannabis.

 MarketWatch - Hemp is now legal in the U.S. - what that means for pot companies

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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@GailL1 wrote:

@aruzinsky

 

Epidiolex Is prescribed for seizures from certain types of syndromes and has become a welcomed relief especially for children suffering from one of these conditions.

 

In my state, it was the efforts of many of these parents and others who worked very hard to get our medical marijuana legislation passed several years ago.  But even then, they had a hard time getting it for this use.  It really wasn't a big stretch for the pharma company to begin the approval process for this CBD compound.

 

But it it goes to show that we seem to be moving forward (slowly) in marijuana medical research.

 

Wonder what will happen to the price when the medical and recreational use begin to compete for the same organic source?  

 

 


CBD is not extracted from the same "organic source" as THC.  CBD is from hemp and you can't get high from smoking hemp.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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@BHG Cannabis has been extremely helpful to reduce my back pain.

 

I used to get super anxious using traditional marijuana, so I switched to CBDs after a friend suggested I try it.

 

Now I use CBD all the time, with no psychoactive effects but all the health/pain reduction benefits.

Sincerely,
Ben Breda
BHG
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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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@aruzinsky

 

Epidiolex Is prescribed for seizures from certain types of syndromes and has become a welcomed relief especially for children suffering from one of these conditions.

 

In my state, it was the efforts of many of these parents and others who worked very hard to get our medical marijuana legislation passed several years ago.  But even then, they had a hard time getting it for this use.  It really wasn't a big stretch for the pharma company to begin the approval process for this CBD compound.

 

But it it goes to show that we seem to be moving forward (slowly) in marijuana medical research.

 

Wonder what will happen to the price when the medical and recreational use begin to compete for the same organic source?  

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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@GailL1 wrote:

As more states legalize marijuana for medical or recreational use — 30 states plus the District of Columbia to date — the cannabis industry is booming. Among the fastest growing group of users: people over 50, with especially steep increases among those 65 and older. And some dispensaries are tailoring their pitches to seniors who are seeking alternative treatments for their aches, pains and other medical conditions.

 

In fact, I heard today that Coke is contemplating a new drink in states where it is legal - medically legal - with cannabidiol, or CBD,  formulated without THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient.

 

No prescription needed - but seniors need to exert caution for several reasons:

1.  it remains a Schedule 1 substance — meaning it’s illegal under federal law - it’s legal in some form in 30 states and the District of Columbia. 

2.  products bought at marijuana dispensaries aren’t FDA-regulated, as are prescription drugs. That means dose and consistency can vary.

3.  There are side-effects

4.  Use caution

  • Talk to your doctor. Tell your doctor you’re thinking about trying medical marijuana. Although he or she may have some concerns, most doctors won’t judge you for seeking out alternative treatments.
  • Make sure your prescriber is aware of all the medications you take. Marijuana might have dangerous interactions with prescription medications, particularly medicines that can be sedating, said Dr. Benjamin Han, a geriatrician at New York University School of Medicine who studies marijuana use in the elderly.
  • Watch out for dosing. Older adults metabolize drugs differently than young people. If your doctor gives you the go-ahead, try the lowest possible dose first to avoid feeling intoxicated. And be especially careful with edibles. They can have very concentrated doses that don’t take effect right away.
  • Elderly people are also more sensitive to side effects. If you start to feel unwell, talk to your doctor right away. “When you’re older, you’re more vulnerable to the side effects of everything,” Han said. “I’m cautious about everything.”
  • Look for licensed providers. In some states like California, licensed dispensaries must test for contaminants. Be especially careful with marijuana bought illegally. “If you’re just buying marijuana down the street … you don’t really know what’s in that,” said Dr. Joshua Briscoe, a palliative care doctor at Duke University School of Medicine who has studied the use of marijuana for pain and nausea in older patients. “Buyer, beware.”

Bottom line: The research on medical marijuana is limited. There’s even less we know about marijuana use in older people. Proceed with caution.

more at:

Kaiser Health News 09/18/2018 - Day-Tripping To The Dispensary: Seniors In Pain Hop Aboard The Canna...


Actually, there is a Schedule V prescription version of CBD, Epidiolex, but, it costs a fortune.

 

https://www.goodrx.com/epidiolex

 

No, I haven't tried CBD.  And, I haven't tried THC since having chronic pain (plenty before then).  I currently take the Schedule IV opioid, pentazocine/naloxone.

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Re: Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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We don't use cannabis, but do use CBD Balm that we bought online. It helps with the pain, but doesn't last long. 

My wife's son used cannibis during part of the time he had cancer, for pain. Unfortunately, he still died at 17. 

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Is it ok to take mm for chronic pain syndrome with diazepam for anxiety? Dr is aware I take it.
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Have you tried Cannabis yet for your aches, pains or other medical conditions?

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As more states legalize marijuana for medical or recreational use — 30 states plus the District of Columbia to date — the cannabis industry is booming. Among the fastest growing group of users: people over 50, with especially steep increases among those 65 and older. And some dispensaries are tailoring their pitches to seniors who are seeking alternative treatments for their aches, pains and other medical conditions.

 

In fact, I heard today that Coke is contemplating a new drink in states where it is legal - medically legal - with cannabidiol, or CBD,  formulated without THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, marijuana’s psychoactive ingredient.

 

No prescription needed - but seniors need to exert caution for several reasons:

1.  it remains a Schedule 1 substance — meaning it’s illegal under federal law - it’s legal in some form in 30 states and the District of Columbia. 

2.  products bought at marijuana dispensaries aren’t FDA-regulated, as are prescription drugs. That means dose and consistency can vary.

3.  There are side-effects

4.  Use caution

  • Talk to your doctor. Tell your doctor you’re thinking about trying medical marijuana. Although he or she may have some concerns, most doctors won’t judge you for seeking out alternative treatments.
  • Make sure your prescriber is aware of all the medications you take. Marijuana might have dangerous interactions with prescription medications, particularly medicines that can be sedating, said Dr. Benjamin Han, a geriatrician at New York University School of Medicine who studies marijuana use in the elderly.
  • Watch out for dosing. Older adults metabolize drugs differently than young people. If your doctor gives you the go-ahead, try the lowest possible dose first to avoid feeling intoxicated. And be especially careful with edibles. They can have very concentrated doses that don’t take effect right away.
  • Elderly people are also more sensitive to side effects. If you start to feel unwell, talk to your doctor right away. “When you’re older, you’re more vulnerable to the side effects of everything,” Han said. “I’m cautious about everything.”
  • Look for licensed providers. In some states like California, licensed dispensaries must test for contaminants. Be especially careful with marijuana bought illegally. “If you’re just buying marijuana down the street … you don’t really know what’s in that,” said Dr. Joshua Briscoe, a palliative care doctor at Duke University School of Medicine who has studied the use of marijuana for pain and nausea in older patients. “Buyer, beware.”

Bottom line: The research on medical marijuana is limited. There’s even less we know about marijuana use in older people. Proceed with caution.

more at:

Kaiser Health News 09/18/2018 - Day-Tripping To The Dispensary: Seniors In Pain Hop Aboard The Canna...

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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