From ‘liquid biopsies’ to precision medicine, these five developments will change cancer care in the next decade. Learn more.

Reply
Info Seeker
0
Kudos
353
Views

Re: Fixable Hearing Loss

353 Views
Message 1 of 2

Thanks for your reply.  Yes, the otosclerosis is the calcification I mentioned.  It is progressive.  In my case, the doctor said the operation would attach the prosthesis to a spot on the ear nerve (cochlea) different from where the stirrup was originally attached.  That was long ago in the late 70's/early 80's when the operation was relatively new and trained doctors relatively few.

I did review an online description of the operation which I saw as more current.  The doctor described significant work with a laser on the footplate area (where the stirrup originally attached) with the intention to remove the offending calcification (my opinion).  I assume this new process is designed at least somewhat to defeat progression as much as possible.  I expect that there is some experience which proves that.  Also, when I had the operation done there were no lasers in the medical bag! 

I will repeat again - get a good doctor, preferably one who specializes in this operation and who has done many operations.  You don't want just anyone mucking around in your middle ear!  In the 70's, my doctor was perhaps the only one in the Chicago area who did the operation.  And he did thousands of them.  If my doctor is still alive, I'm sure he is not practicing any longer.

 

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
353
Views
Info Seeker
0
Kudos
435
Views
1
Replies

Fixable Hearing Loss

435 Views
Message 2 of 2

I am posting this because I never see anyone discussing this.  I had my hearing loss fixed when I was in my late 30's/early 40's.  I am now 75.  I had conductive hearing loss.  This was fixable in my case.  Conductive hearing loss can be caused by calcification in the middle ear where the third bone (stirrup or stapes) connects to the hearing nerve.  This causes the eardrum/middle ear bone/hearing nerve sound transmission to not happen (or to happen less than perfectly).

A good audiologist can determine if your hearing loss is conductive or due to damage to your hearing nerve.  S/he uses a special device like an earphone which instead of your ear, rests on your skull bone.  A person with good hearing nerve and conductive hearing loss will hear sound very well through this device and will not hear well through a standard earphone.  This test is administered in an office visit.

If you have conductive hearing loss it may be fixable.  There is an operation called stapedectomy (also stapedotomy) in which an ear specialist replaces the stirrup with a small plastic or metal prosthesis.  Forty years ago I spent one night in the hospital following the operation.  It is a good operation and you need to find a doctor who specializes in it.  The operation is through the ear canal.  The eardrum is peeled back for access to the middle ear and replaced following the operation.

I had both ears done, one at a time.  I have no physical restrictions.  I have no hearing aid.  My mother had the same hearing loss and operation.  For the second one she was in her 60's.  Look it up (stapedectomy, stapedotomy).

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
435
Views
1
Replies
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

Are you new to the online community? Say Hi and tell us a bit about yourself, your interests, and how we can help make this community a great experience for you!


close-up group of seniors smiling at camera