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Re: Fact on Uterine Fibroids Every Woman Should Know

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@BronwynM413834  Happy day! We are so blessed to have your expertise and generosity.  Thanks again for sharing!

 

Enjoy your weekend as well!

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Fact on Uterine Fibroids Every Woman Should Know

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@Epster wrote:

Hi @BronwynM413834  Mine was one of the accounts affected by the recent system failures, so I've been able to see your posts but have been unable to give kudos or post a reply. I just wanted to let you know that I, for one, appreciate the information you are sharing. Thanks for what you are adding to this community! Keep it up! Smiley Happy

 

That being said, I have an observation about this topic: as a 58-year-old woman who had a hysterectomy in her 20s, my childbearing years have long passed. Most women here are, I think, older than me, and while it's unlikely that many of them also had a hysterectomy in their 20s, I'm going out on a limb to suggest that for them, too, childbearing years have (blissfully) passed. Smiley Happy So. Uh. So? I mean, shall I worry about fibroids at this point? Nah, not gonna add that to my plate, ya know?

 

And then there's this: if this is your original article, that's great and thank you so much for sharing your knowledge. If it is not, you should site the original and include a link to that piece. (Also, to keep your b-u-t-t out of hot water, you'll want to post a portion of the original rather than the entire piece.)  Smiley Happy

 

But back to this: Yay! I'm glad you are here! Smiley Happy

 

 

 


Greetings @Epster..

 

Thank you kindly for the response, I am glad if my inputs can give others information on general health topics that some may be having issues with or questions on.

 

I write all my own articles and love doing research, and sharing, lol :-) However, if I do get that I use information from one specific site or article, I will bear in mind to add the source.

 

Thank you kindly for the information and support :-)

Have a fabulous weekend :-)

 

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Re: Fact on Uterine Fibroids Every Woman Should Know

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Hi @BronwynM413834  Mine was one of the accounts affected by the recent system failures, so I've been able to see your posts but have been unable to give kudos or post a reply. I just wanted to let you know that I, for one, appreciate the information you are sharing. Thanks for what you are adding to this community! Keep it up! Smiley Happy

 

That being said, I have an observation about this topic: as a 58-year-old woman who had a hysterectomy in her 20s, my childbearing years have long passed. Most women here are, I think, older than me, and while it's unlikely that many of them also had a hysterectomy in their 20s, I'm going out on a limb to suggest that for them, too, childbearing years have (blissfully) passed. Smiley Happy So. Uh. So? I mean, shall I worry about fibroids at this point? Nah, not gonna add that to my plate, ya know?

 

And then there's this: if this is your original article, that's great and thank you so much for sharing your knowledge. If it is not, you should site the original and include a link to that piece. (Also, to keep your b-u-t-t out of hot water, you'll want to post a portion of the original rather than the entire piece.)  Smiley Happy

 

But back to this: Yay! I'm glad you are here! Smiley Happy

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Fact on Uterine Fibroids Every Woman Should Know

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It’s very common for women during childbearing ages to develop uterine fibroid tumors that are non-cancerous. This condition is one of the reasons that there are over two-hundred thousand hysterectomies performed each year.sexy-1721447_1280.jpg

 

 

 

To great extent, this won’t just affect the women who develop the condition, but also their spouse, partner, and family. Although it affects such a great deal of women, it’s still a condition that baffles scientists and doctors. Scientists and researchers are exploring environmental factors, immune system, hormones, and genetics to find out what role it might play in fibroids growths.

Different kinds of uterine fibroids

The difference in fibroid types will depend on where it’s located within the uterus.

 

Sub-serosal fibroids

This mass normally forms underneath the serous membrane, which is the layer covering your uterus’ external parts. It can lead to the uterus appearing nodular.

 

Submucosal fibroids

These form below the myometrium, which is the protective layer of the uterus’ interior wall. It may extend further into your uterus’ internal cavity. Due to the fact that it keeps on growing, it tends to occupy a very large area of it.

 

Intramural fibroids

This is seen as masses forming inside your uterus’ muscular wall. As it gets bigger, it may distort your internal and exterior wall of the uterus.

 

Pedunculated fibroids

These types of fibroids actually are like the sub-serous, although they differ from the one mentioned above. They grow upwards detaching away from your uterus, and are held through a fine strand called a pedicle. This tumor grows into or to the outside of your uterine cavity.

What symptoms to look for?

Ordinarily, there aren’t really any symptoms. Therefore, it would be difficult to accurately diagnose these conditions. Depending on the number of fibroids, their size and location, it’s possible to experience some symptoms that are common.young-woman-1191978_1280.jpg

 

 

 

Symptoms may include:

Pelvic pressure and pain,

Bleeding that is excessive, passing clots, as well as prolonged,

Swelling of the abdomen,

Frequent urination caused by pressure on the bladder,

Bowel pressure that may cause bloating and constipation,

Infertility,

Pain and inflammation in the abdomen’s lower part,

A sudden increase in weight,

High-risk births and pregnancies,

Experience pain with intercourse,

Backaches,

Other facts about fibroids women must know and understand

Women of any age can be affected by uterine fibroids, but usually, it is found more common among women between the ages of forty to fifty.

 

It’s dependent and thrives on estrogen. Most of the time, it doesn’t develop prior to menstruation or when women start to produce estrogen. While a woman is pregnant it will grow very fast because of the additional estrogen her body produces.

 

It is very rare for these tumors to turn cancerous. Normally, they can be diagnosed through an ultrasound or MRI/Magnetic Resonance Imaging. These can also be used for determining what treatment plan to follow.

 

It’s possible to treat uterine fibroids through surgery. Or, with a hysterectomy whereby the uterus is entirely removed, or a myomectomy, in which case the uterus stay intact and only the fibroids get removed. This is both surgeries that are major.

 

Find out more about what a myomectomy exactly is.

It’s important to discuss all your options thoroughly with the doctor. Find out what lays ahead for you prior to making your final decision. You need to feel confident that you understand everything and also how it might affect you and your family.

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