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Community Manager
Community Manager

Tips for Staying Safe & Secure Online

AARP's book My Online Privacy for Seniors offers simple steps to protect your safety and privacy, whether you are on your computer, phone, tablet or smart devices.

 

Here are 3 tips excerpted from the book on how to help you navigate our ever-changing connected world.

  1. Safely surf the internet - One key way websites and online services collect and use information about you is by using cookies. A cookie is a tiny file that's transferred to your computer from a website you visit. Each web browser has a different process for turning on/off or adjusting its cookie-related features. Websites now are required to tell you if they use cookies and you must give them permission. This is usually done via a popup or banner on the website homepage. If you need help adjusting your cookie settings, search for how-tos and include the name of the browser you are using.
  2. Protect your security when working with emails - If your computer is connected to the internet via wifi, a vulnerability exists when your computer wirelessly sends information through your home internet router or modem, or through a public wifi hotspot. A best practice is to not check your emails when using public, non-password protected wifi. To protect yourself fully at home, consider installing a virtual private network (VPN) that'll work in conjunction with your web browser to encrypt all information as it leaves your computer or mobile device.
  3. Remember online security basics - Don't use common passwords. These include the word “password,” your name, your child's name, your spouse's name, your pet's name, your birth date, your anniversary date, your phone number, the letters “abcdefgh,” the number sequence “12345678,” the number sequence “87654321,” the number sequence “11111111,” the phrase “letmein,” the word “football,” the phrase “iloveyou,” or anything along these lines. (For example, using the password “22222222” is just as bad as using “11111111.") Using any of these passwords can compromise your online security.

 

For additional helpful suggestions, check out Strategies for Staying Safe and Secure Online.

 

Do you have additional tips and advice? Leave a reply today.

Regular Contributor

Human Behavior


Probably the greatest threat to the security of your computer system is..... human behavior. Let's face it, we humans do stupid things! A majority of the viruses, bugs, spyware, spam and other nasties can be avoided or reduced by modifying our behavior on the Internet. Read the following suggestions for practicing safe surfing:


Do not visit shady looking web sites. (You know the ones I mean!)

 

Do not click on links in pop-up windows. Even if they tell you that your pc is infected or has a problem that you must fix immediately! It's a scam. Chrome, Firefox and Opera browsers feature pop-up blockers -- be sure to turn them on.

 

Do not click on links in emails. If you really wish to visit the site shown, type it in the address bar of your web browser by hand. It's probably a good idea when entering the web address to ignore any characters to the right of .com (or .net, .org, etc.).

 

Do not respond to spam (junk email) -- just delete it or, even better, mark it as junk if your email program has that option. If you respond, then you are telling the spammer that he has reached a valid email address. Never click on any links that say something like "To unsubscribe, click here". That's just what they want you to do.

 

Do not respond to or click on links in emails that look exactly like email from your bank, credit card company, retail stores, insurance companies, etc.. This is called "phishing". Once you visit their site, they'll try to get private data from you, like passwords. These web sites can look identical to your own trusted sites. If you really wish to visit the site shown, type it in the address bar of your web browser by hand. When in doubt, call the institution on the phone.

 

Phishing is the act of sending an email to a user falsely claiming to be a legitimate enterprise? This is an attempt to scam the user into surrendering private information that will be used for identity theft. The email directs the user to visit a web site where they are asked to update personal information, such as passwords and credit card, social security, and bank account numbers, that the legitimate organization already has. The web site is bogus and set up only to steal the user's information.

 

Do not open attachments in emails, unless you're absolutely sure it's from someone you know and trust. If you're unsure, call the person or send them a separate email verifying the attachment is valid. Certain viruses can access someone's address book and copy the email addresses found there. Then they can send you email that looks exactly like it came from your Aunt Tilly using a technique called address spoofing. If you need someone to email you an attachment, make sure they tell you about it first or request it from them in advance.

 

Do not use your home or primary email address to fill out forms or subscribe to services on the Internet. Get a free email account from Gmail or Yahoo for these purposes.

 

Shop online from reputable companies only. It's safe to use your credit card to pay for purchases online at any store as long as when you checkout, you see a little padlock to the left of the website address bar of your browser. This means that the transaction is secure. If you don't see this padlock -- DO NOT CONTINUE WITH THE PURCHASE! The padlock is not just a picture. Click on it to see details of the site's security. This is important because some fraudulent web sites will imitate the lock icon of your browser with an image. It's also a good idea to use the same credit card for all of your online shopping. If there is ever a problem, all you have to do is cancel that one card.

 

DO NOT GIVE OUT PERSONAL INFORMATION LIKE SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBERS OR BANK ACCOUNT NUMBERS ON THE INTERNET!!! Any website or email asking you for this information is trying to rip you off!

 

DO NOT RESPOND TO E-MAILS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS (LIKE NIGERIA) ASKING YOU TO HELP THEM RECOVER MILLIONS OF DOLLARS!!! The list of unfortunate souls who have lost their life savings to this scam is very long.

 

Do not download music, movies or software from illegal sources.. It's a sure fire way to pick up viruses and spyware. For music, stick to legal sources such as iTunes, Napster or Spotify.

 

Trusted Contributor

Good tips!  I'd like to know how to "unsubscribe" from newsletters, etc if using that unsubscribe button is a no-no.  Or does that advice only apply to newsletters, etc that you never signed up for?  If so, how do you stop unsolicited newsletters, etc from arriving in your inbox?

Regular Contributor

Never use the "unsubscribe" button.  It just confirms you are a real person and the spam will increase.  Most trusted email programs (Thunderbird) will have a junk feature where you can label these emails as "junk" and eventually you will not see them again.  This can be used whether or not the emails were requested by you or are unsolicited. 

 

Gold Conversationalist

Mostly unsolicited newsletters etc..  If there is any doubt, however, most email services have a "Filter" function.  If you don't want to click an "Unsubscribe" button either in an email or on a web site, you can set up a Filter to send them to Trash and mark them as Read.

This has the added benefit that if you become concerned that you missed something important, you can check your Trash folder.  Things will usually sit in the Trash folder for about 30 days before being purged.

Regular Contributor

This is not the default for many email programs.  You have to manually set these parameters.

 

Regular Contributor

One other thing is that if you get email from your bank, PayPal, Amazon, etc... and it addresses you as "Valued Customer" or anything other than your name, it is a scam.

 

I mean, doesn't your bank, PayPal and Amazon know your name? They will never call you "valued customer".

Regular Contributor

Do not respond to or click on links in emails that look exactly like email from your bank, credit card company, retail stores, insurance companies, etc.. This is called "phishing". Once you visit their site, they'll try to get private data from you, like passwords. These web sites can look identical to your own trusted sites. If you really wish to visit the site shown, type it in the address bar of your web browser by hand. When in doubt, call the institution on the phone.

 

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