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Re: Travelling with a wheelchair, medications, oxygen or other equipment.

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Here is a list of wheelchair, medications, and oxygen equipment policies at major airlines. This list was compiled by TripSavvy. It is the most complete overview of airline policies that I have found.

 

Wheelchair Policies at Top 10 U.S. Airlines

 

Wheelchair Policies at Top 10 International Airlines

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Re: Travelling with a wheelchair, medications, oxygen or other equipment.

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I just received this from the Department of Transportation (DOT). On September 12, 2019, the US Access Board will hold a public hearing that will provide an opportunity to submit comments either in person or by phone. Comments on the proposal can also be submitted in writing until October 21, 2019. Just follow the instructions below. This is small part of the efforts that are made by Travelers United to help travelers.

Charlie

 

 

U.S. Access Board Releases Voluntary Guidelines for Onboard Wheelchairs for Public Comment

The U.S. Access Board has released for public comment advisory guidelines for wheelchairs used on commercial passenger aircraft during flight. These onboard wheelchairs are provided by air carriers as a means of facilitating the transfer of passengers with disabilities to aircraft lavatories since personal wheelchairs cannot be used in the cabin. The Department of Transportation (DOT) has expressed its intention to supplement its regulations under the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) to include performance standards for onboard wheelchairs on covered aircraft. The Board is developing these non-binding guidelines as technical assistance to air carriers and manufacturers of onboard wheelchairs by providing an example of how to meet DOT's planned performance standards.

 

As indicated in a notice published in the Federal Register, the guidelines specify dimensions, features, and capabilities for onboard wheelchairs that will allow passengers with disabilities to be more safely and comfortably transported aboard airplanes in flight. In addition, the guidelines include criteria to allow the onboard wheelchair to fully enter the lavatory in a backward orientation and be positioned over a closed toilet, and for the lavatory door to be closed. This feature would afford those passengers who cannot independently transfer to the toilet to have privacy in performing non-toileting tasks related to personal hygiene or medical needs. The Board has posed a number of questions to the public about specific provisions in the guidelines but welcomes input on all portions of the document.

 

As part of a negotiated rulemaking to improve access for air travelers with disabilities, DOT has put forth plans to supplement its ACAA regulations and require onboard wheelchairs with enhanced functionality on aircraft with more than 125 passenger seats.

Related information, including instructions for submitting comments, is posted at www.regulations.gov (Docket ATBCB-2019-0002). Comments are due October 21, 2019. In addition, on September 12, 2019, the Board will hold a public hearing that will provide an opportunity to submit comments either in person or by phone. Further details will be posted on the Board's website at www.access-board.gov/onboard. Those who wish to provide testimony at the hearing should contact Rose Marie Bunales at (202) 272-0006 (voice) orbunales@access-board.gov by September 5, 2019.

 

For further details on the guidelines or the public hearing, contact Wendy Marshall at (202) 272-0043 (voice) or marshall@access-board.gov, or Mario Damiani at (202) 272-0050 (voice) or damiani@access-board.gov.

 

Public Hearing on Advisory Guidelines for Aircraft Onboard Wheelchairs  
September 12, 2019, 9:30 - 4:00 (ET)
Remote attendance options will be posted at: www.access-board.gov/onboard
Access Board Conference Center 
1331 F Street, NW, Suite 800
Washington, D.C. 

 

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Re: DOT's Tips for Traveling with Wheelchairs and other devices. More DOT Tips on assistive devices

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An assistive device is any piece of equipment that assists a passenger with a disability in coping with the effects of his or her disability.  These devices are intended to assist passengers with a disability to hear, see, communicate, maneuver, or perform other functions of daily life.  Assistive devices include (but are not limited to):

  • Crutches, Canes, and Walkers
  • Braces/Prosthetics
  • Wheelchairs
  • Hearing aids
  • Portable Oxygen Concentrators (POCs)
  • Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machines
  • Prescription medications and any medical devices needed to administer those medications, such as syringes or auto-injectors

Note:  If you are not sure if your device is an assistive device, contact your airline’s disability or special assistance desk.

Things to Know

Can I bring my assistive device in the passenger cabin of the aircraft?

  • Yes.  You may bring your assistive device with you on an airplane and stow it in the passenger compartment in the following locations:
    • In an overhead compartment;
    • Under the seat in front of you; or
    • In a designated stowage area if the device fits and is in accordance with FAA or foreign safety regulations.

If my assistive device cannot be stowed in the passenger cabin as carry-on baggage, do I have to pay a checked bag fee?

  • No.  If this happens, the device can be stowed as cargo at no extra cost.

If my device could not be stowed in the cabin, when and where can I pick it up after the flight?

  • Your device must be returned to you in a timely manner as close as possible to the door of the aircraft, unless you ask to pick it up in baggage claim. Airlines must check and return your assistive device in the same condition as it was received.

Can I bring my battery-powered wheelchair onboard the seating portion of the aircraft?

  • No.  Airlines are required to transport only manual wheelchairs in the cabin of the aircraft.  Most battery powered wheelchairs are too large and too heavy to be safely stowed in the seating portion of the aircraft.  Large and heavy powered wheelchairs are typically stowed in the cargo portion of the aircraft. 
  • When your powered wheelchair is stowed in the cargo compartment, the airline must return your assistive device to you in a timely manner as close as possible to the door of the aircraft, unless you ask to pick it up in baggage claim.  

Can I bring my manual collapsible folding wheelchair onboard the seating portion of the aircraft?

  • Maybe.  Individuals with a collapsible or break-down wheelchair may stow their device in overhead compartments, under seats, or in the designated wheelchair stowage area if the device fits and is in accordance with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) safety regulations.  
  • Airlines are required to accept for transport at least one manual wheelchair in aircraft with 100 or more seats.
  • If your wheelchair does not fit in the cabin of the aircraft, airline personnel are required to stow it in the cargo portion of the aircraft free of charge. 

Can I use my portable oxygen concentrator (POC) onboard the aircraft?

  • Yes.  The airline must allow you to bring your POC onboard the aircraft as long as it meets FAA requirements.

Do any special requirements apply to my use of a POC onboard the airplane?

  • Yes.  Airlines can require you to:
    • Provide up to 48-hours advance notice that you will use your POC onboard;
    • Provide a medical certificate for the use of your POC onboard;
    • Bring a supply of fully charged batteries to power your device for no less than 150% of the duration of the flight; or
    • Check in one hour before the regular check in time for the flight.

If I bring an assistive device onboard the aircraft, does it count towards my baggage limit? 

  • No.  Assistive devices do not count toward your baggage limit.  However, if your bag also contains personal items, the airline can count your bag toward a baggage limit and it may be subject to a baggage fee.

For additional relevant policies regarding loading, stowing, and returning assistive devices to passengers with disabilities, please consult our helpful interactive guide

 

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DOT's Tips for Traveling with Wheelchairs and other devices

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These come from the DOT rules. 

 

Before Your Trip

  • Confirm with airline that your wheelchair will fit in cargo hold if you are traveling on a small plane, like a commuter aircraft or a regional jet.
  • Attach clear assembly and disassembly instructions to your wheelchair before you head to the airport.  Having written instructions will assist airline personnel and contractors in case your wheelchair needs to be disassembled for transport.

At the Airport

  • If you travel with a battery-powered wheelchair, you must arrive at the airport 1 hour prior to the normal check-in time.
  • If your wheelchair or walker cannot be carried in the cabin, you can check it. 
  • If you have a wheelchair or walker, you do not need to check them until you are at the gate.
  • You can request that your wheelchair or walker be returned to you on the jet way at your destination airport and not the baggage claim area.  Airlines are required to return wheelchairs to users as closely as possible to the door of the aircraft if requested.
  • Upon receiving your wheelchair, do a quick inspection before you use it.  If there is any damage go immediately to the airline’s customer service and file a claim.

If Something Goes Wrong

  • On domestic flights, U.S. carriers must fully compensate passengers for loss or damage to wheelchairs or other assistive devices, without regard to rules limiting liability for lost or damaged baggage.
  • On international flights, the Montreal convention provisions control payments for items including assistive devices. 
  • If you believe your rights have been violated and the airline employee you find at first is unable to help you, ask to speak with a Complaints Resolution Official (CRO). A CRO is the airline’s expert on disability accommodation issues. Airlines are required to make one available to you, at no cost, in person at the airport or by telephone during the times they are operating.
 

 

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Re: Traveling with patient

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This is really a question for your doctor. If a nurse is required, however, she may accompany him through all security checks and will be seated with him.

 

Make sure to let the airline your are flying know that you have a special needs person that you need to accompany. They will provide seat assignments and other assistance.

 

The TSA program that can help is called TSA Cares. 

 

Email TSA Cares
(855) 787-2227
Federal Relay: 711

Weekdays:
8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET
Weekends/Holidays:
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET

 

You can also to AskTSA on Facebook or Twitter for assistance. 

Where possible, TSA will meet those who have special needs at the entrance of the airport and provide assistance. This service is not available at all airports, however, other assistance is available.

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Re: Travelling with a wheelchair, medications, oxygen or other equipment.

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The TSA program is called TSA Cares. 

 

Email TSA Cares
(855) 787-2227
Federal Relay: 711

Weekdays:
8 a.m. to 11 p.m. ET
Weekends/Holidays:
9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET

 

You can also to AskTSA on Facebook or Twitter for assistance. 

Where possible, TSA will meet those who have special needs at the entrance of the airport and provide assistance. This service is not available at all airports, however, other assistance is available.

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Re: Travelling with a wheelchair, medications, oxygen or other equipment.

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My son is a quadriplegic with a power chair.  We recently took his first aiplane trip since his accident to Seattle from California via Alaska Airlines.  The airlines team was helpful and encouraging.  My son is 6'2' and 200 lbs but the airport team did a great job transfering him at both the Seattle and Orange County flights.  Security took a lot longer because of the chair, with my son unable to get up for screening.  A helpful TSA agent at Seattle gave us a card and told us next time to call TSA with the flight info and an agent would meet us at the airport and escort us all the way through security for faster processing.  Slight damage to chair, but we fixed at the airport.

The biggest concern was his hoyer lift, which is portable but heavy.  I had to have my niece travel in separate taxi with lift and luggage from airport to hotel and back, while my son and I took public transportation (the light rail) both ways.  Wrenched my arm dragging the lift from gate to taxi stand in Seattle as there was a bit of a walk. Will get smarter about checking out how far out I can take the smart kart rental next time.  My son was so happy to be traveling again!

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Traveling with patient

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My son is in the hospital from a car accident he was writing his skateboard when he got hit head on with an on coming car. Since then he has recovered very well and is continuing to progress everyday. Does he he need a nurse to travel with him on a plane ?

 

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Travelling with a wheelchair, medications, oxygen or other equipment.

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Have you struggled when travelling with equipment?  Have you ever had a wheelchair damaged while in an airport?  Get great advice from our travel expert.  Ask your questions here.

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