Tell Congress to stop Rx greed and cut prescription drug prices now! Here’s how.

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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 11 of 19

recommedation : seek medical treatment ASAP  froma a local MD certified Gerentologist  !!

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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 12 of 19

@Brooklyn1153

 

As you probably know, loneliness can pose serious physcial and mental health problems for people as they age.  In these times with families spread apart in different places, it can be hard to know how to help. People who lack social connections can be reluctant to reach out to others. Volunteering in the community can provide a reason for making social connections, and it benefits both your own brain health as well as whomever else you are helping. Studies have demonstrated that feeling purpose in life is associated with a 20% reduction in the risk for dementia! Try not to push a particular solution but ask questions to determine what is of interest to your sister. Are your other family members willing to arrange to make regular calls to your sister? The Brain and Social Connectedness Report provides lots of tips at https://bit.ly/2KS9nOQ. If your sister's doctor refuses to listen to her concerns, then maybe it’s time to look for another one who will!

Sarah Lenz Lock, AARP Expert Brain Health
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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 13 of 19

@JohnS34751

Sounds like good advice!  Not being able to remember the name of an aquaintance is normal aging, but if you can't recognize a family member then that is a concern.  If you are ocasionally forgetting things or events, or if you are not able to find the right word sometimes, that is normal.  But if you are frequently forgetting things and regularly struggle with word choice, then you should get that checked out. One of my favorite examples is that forgetting where you put your keys  is normal, but not remembering whether you drove your car home or not last night is a reason to get evaluated.  Two rules of thumb to ask yourself:  1.  Is it serious enough that it is impacting my daily  life?  2.  Does everyone else who knows me well seemed alarmed, but not me?  Sarah

Sarah Lenz Lock, AARP Expert Brain Health
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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 14 of 19

@StuartR890144

Hi Frank,

 

If you are worried about your ability to comprehend information in reading and conversation, you should definitely talk to your family health care provider. But part of comprehension is focus and memory.  Lots of people as they age lose some of their ability to maintain focused attention, experience memory loss, or find that their ability to process information is not as fast as it was when they were younger. That is normal, and there are activities that can help to maintain these and other cognitive functions over time. I recommend taking a look at the Global Council on Brain Health's report, Engage Your Brain for strategies to help you improve focus.  Sometimes improving your sleep, fixing a vitamin deficiency, or simply paying more attention can help.  But if its starting to interfere with your life and you remain concerned, your doctor should evaluate whether it is nothing to worry about, something that is a simple fix, or something more serious like dementia.  Sarah

Sarah Lenz Lock, AARP Expert Brain Health
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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 15 of 19

I seem to be experiencing a loss of comprehension in reading and in conversation.  Sound like demetia?

 

Frank

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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 16 of 19

I asked my doctor about this topic citing minor occurances of forgetfulness.  She assured me that since I was aware of them and they were not bad enough to incite worry rather than minor concern I was within the normal range of aging effects and did not rate alarm or concern. 

The bottom line would seem to be don't worry until it becomes a real problem.

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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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My sister just turned 65 years old.  For the last two years she has been asking the same questions repeatedly.  She tells the same story over and over in the same conversation.  She spends a lot of time alone with no one to talk to while her husband works. They live in a one bedroom apartment in another state away from family.  She recently spent a week with me and it is getting worse. She is adamant about not going to the doctor because she says they don’t listen to her.  I don’t know what to do.

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Re: Dementia Expert Series, Week 1

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Message 18 of 19

Can we talk about forgetfulness or confusion in conversation?  What is in the range of normal versus what may be a sign of something else going on?  I'm thinking of examples like leaving the keys in the front door and mixing up names or events  when talking and not catching it.   These are things that any of us can do, especially if we're stressed or distracted, but how much of a pattern or repetition should we be aware of?

Amanda Singleton
All posts are intended to convey general information only and not to provide legal advice or opinions. The posting and viewing of the information in this community should not be construed as, and should not be relied upon for, legal or tax advice in any particular circumstance or fact situation. The information presented may not reflect the most current legal developments. An attorney should be contacted for advice on specific legal issues. Nothing written in this community is intended to create an attorney‑client relationship. An attorney-client relationship may only be established through direct attorney‑to‑client communication that is confirmed by the execution of an engagement agreement.
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Dementia Expert Series, Normal Aging or Dementia? Dementia Expert series

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Are you having trouble telling the difference between normal aging and dementia?  Ask our expert Sarah Lock.  She is Senior Vice President for Policy and Brain Health in AARP’s Policy, Research and International. She leads policy initiatives on brain health and care for people living with dementia and is Executive Director of the Global Council on Brain Health, an independent collaborative of scientists, doctors and policy experts convened by AARP to provide trusted information on brain health.

AARPTeri
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