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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 21 of 33
Try 1 ply paper, it will last a little longer.
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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 22 of 33

It is due to percentages.  At 5 years old 1 year is 20% of your life.

At 65 1 year is just over 1.5% of your life.  1.5% seems faster than 20%.

 

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 23 of 33

I don't perceive time passing any more quickly now that I am past the mid-70 mark. Although my days are not as busy as they once were, time passes the same for me as it did 25 years ago.

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 24 of 33

Thats why I only buy x-large rolls, takes longer to get to the end.. lol

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 25 of 33
Life is like a roll of toilet paper, the nearer the end the faster it unrolls
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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 26 of 33

Days and nights very slow.

Years too fast. 


MichaelSpitzer wrote:

Since the feeling of time passing faster as we age is universal and seems to be reported by both active people and those in retirement homes with very little daily variety, we propose a different theory.

Not just a psychological fact, but a truly biological effect related to aging. Just as wrinkles, grey hair, weakened eyesight and loose skin are universal symptoms of aging --- I theorize that something about the aging of the brain actually changes the way memory is perceived.

This would explain why it is a universal phenomenon and is reported by people of all activity levels. It is not as simple as saying busy people feel time flies by faster, because even interviews with older people in nursing homes who only play cards all day or sit by a lake looking at nature or reading a book still claim time flies by faster and faster for them each year.

Your thoughts ?

Michael Spitzer
Author
FITNESS AT 40,50,60 AND BEYOND


 

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 27 of 33

it's the math...

at 10 years of age, 1 year is 1/10th of your life...a pretty big chunk of time...

at 60 years of age 1 year is 1/60th of your life...a relatively small chunk of time...

so at 60:

1 year is experienced as 1/6th of 1/10th of the experience of the 10 year old experince of 1 year....the result is a much faster experience of 1 year.

larry kutnicki

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 28 of 33

Liltman wrote:

Time flies when you're having fun. 


Old age is hard work!  The fun is all relative to what you're doing at the time.

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 29 of 33

Time flies when you're having fun. 

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Re: Time Seems To Race By Faster As We Age

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Message 30 of 33
MichaelSpitzer wrote:

Good point
Along those lines, I have also said that the human brain's "random access memory " is also a factor.

You can instantly recall something that happened 40 years ago as quickly as something that happened 4 hours ago.
This can kind of "mess around" with relative time perception.

On the other hand, if our brains worked like tape drives, where you had to hit REWIND and wait while your brain rolled backwards to recall an old memory, then time might feel more consistent.


Maybe it's not quite that "random". Maybe every memory has a "weight factor"; some are more important than others. When a memory has a very high weight factor, maybe it's stored "closer" for easier access. That would explain why we immediately remember the names of some people we meet, and others whose names we hear multiple times, aren't as important to us, and they're stored "far in the back" of our minds!


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