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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 1 of 12

ASTRAEA wrote:

@Epster - I would have said the same thing to anyone, who disagreed with information in a book, while saying they hadn't read it. If by "acerbic" you mean "forthright, I am that; I'm sorry if you thought that meant I was "gunning for you".


I appreciate and accept your apology.

 

I didn't mean forthright, not exactly. I consider my calling you out for your sharp tone when I had clearly stated that I'd studied this subject for years and thus without reading this particular book could tell you that I wasn't inclined to agree with the stated hypothesis, to be forthright.

 

As an engineer, I am sure you are accustomed to the practice of weighing new information against information one has already taken onboard. This is how we wrestle with new ideas, and also how studies and hypotheses are peer reviewed. It is also a method to encourage discussion. That's what I was doing. Or trying to initiate, at any rate.

 

I suppose this leaves us at you say forthright, I say acerbic, let's call the whole thing off, eh? Smiley Happy

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 2 of 12

@Epster - I would have said the same thing to anyone, who disagreed with information in a book, while saying they hadn't read it. If by "acerbic" you mean "forthright, I am that; I'm sorry if you thought that meant I was "gunning for you".


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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 3 of 12

 


Perhaps you should read part of this, before making a judgement like that! While exercise is important, if the brain isn't getting the proper nutrients & oxygenation, it makes exercising more difficult & less effective.

To continue my thoughts here: as we all presumably would like a nice community in which to share ideas, think outloud, ask questions and to grow, methinks rather than telling me I should read the book, which I cannot do this morning, or even this week, perhaps a response more conducive to chat would have been to post an excerpt of said book.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 4 of 12

 

 


ASTRAEA wrote:

Epster wrote:


Without reading this particular material, but having read quite a bit on brain health, BMI, nutrition and aging, my gut reaction to this is: nah, it has more to do with physical activity. Physical activity increases blood circulation, which helps keep all parts in better operating condition. Inactivity, on the other hand, does not. Use it or lose it, basically.

 


Perhaps you should read part of this, before making a judgement like that! While exercise is important, if the brain isn't getting the proper nutrients & oxygenation, it makes exercising more difficult & less effective.


Smiley Happy

 

I was clearly stating my gut reaction based on decades of nutrition and exercise study. 

 

My thoughts stand. Sorry. (And is it my imagination or are you typically gunning for me, Astraea? What's up with that? This is not the political forum, no need to be acerbic, is there?)

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 5 of 12

Epster wrote:


Without reading this particular material, but having read quite a bit on brain health, BMI, nutrition and aging, my gut reaction to this is: nah, it has more to do with physical activity. Physical activity increases blood circulation, which helps keep all parts in better operating condition. Inactivity, on the other hand, does not. Use it or lose it, basically.

 


Perhaps you should read part of this, before making a judgement like that! While exercise is important, if the brain isn't getting the proper nutrients & oxygenation, it makes exercising more difficult & less effective.


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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 6 of 12

You convinced me and fortunately my library system has several copies of the book.  Will update here when I begin reading it. 

 

You are on  great journey to change your approach to health I know from reading your posts.  You were health conscious before your journey began.  Would love to read about how & what you are changing and if you are feeling the benefits yet. 

Ad terminum vitae meae nōn venī.
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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 7 of 12

ASTRAEA wrote:

 

 

In seeing this topic again, I kind of wonder if the brain decline identified in this study is due more to the poor diet of participants, than their being overweight itself.


Without reading this particular material, but having read quite a bit on brain health, BMI, nutrition and aging, my gut reaction to this is: nah, it has more to do with physical activity. Physical activity increases blood circulation, which helps keep all parts in better operating condition. Inactivity, on the other hand, does not. Use it or lose it, basically.

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 8 of 12

A few weeks ago, I mentioned to my trainer (also a nutritionist) if she had any other good books to lend or recommend, and she gave me "Why Isn't My Brain Working?: A Revolutionary Understanding of Brain Decline and Effective Strategies to Recover Your Brain's Health" by Dr. Datis Kharrazian. It's a heavy 500 page paperback that's dense with information .. but a fascinating & relatively easy read.

 

At first I was tempted to put a cover on the book, since MY brain is working fine .. but I got over that! Smiley Happy It talks so much about healthy diet being not only connected to our body's health .. but brain health as well! I'm enjoying the book so much, that I just ordered my own copy, so I can make notes & put stickies in it!

 

In seeing this topic again, I kind of wonder if the brain decline identified in this study is due more to the poor diet of participants, than their being overweight itself.


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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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Message 9 of 12

@retiredtraveler - I'm too lazy to convert those metric numbers! Smiley Happy


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Re: The brains of overweight people look "10 years older" than those of leaner peers

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"...The mean age was 54 years (range 20–87), and mean BMI was 26 kg/m2 (18.5–45.5). The final cohort included 246 (51%) lean controls (BMI between 18.5–25 kgm−2), 150 overweight subjects (31%; BMI 25–30 kgm−2), and 77 obese subjects (BMI >30 kgm−2). There was a significant positive correlation between age and BMI (r = 0.24, p < 0.001). Various health and lifestyle factors were recorded including self-reported history of diagnosis of diabetes, stroke, cancer, myocardial infarction, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. A self-report questionnaire was used to calculated total estimated physical activity per week (measures as kJ/d/Kg). Education level was binarized to those with or without degree-level qualifications. Gross household income was also included, defined as those above and below a threshold income of £30,000. There were no incidences of Parkinson's disease or multiple sclerosis. Cognitive performance was quantified using Cattell Culture Fair...".


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