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AARP Online Community Memory Contest 2021 Week 2 of 3

Nationally recognized as the “mother of the modern day civil rights movement” in America. 

 

rosaparks.jpg

What memory is triggered for you when you see this photo?

 

This is an iconic photo of the Civil Rights movement, when did you first see it?  What can you share about that experience?

 

Rules:   https://community.aarp.org/t5/Brain-Health/AARP-Online-Community-Memory-Contest-2021-Week-2-Official...

 

Week 2:  August 23 - August 29, 2021

 

 

AARPTeri
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Newbie

Although this moment in history was monumental, I remember not being taught about it in elementary school, which is a disservice to all young students. Not only that, it is one of the many symptoms of systemic racism; something we can all have a hand in eradicating. Black history is American history - it's everyone's history. Until we uphold it to the level it deserves, nothing will change. Our young people have the right to the whole story of America and all Americans without regard to race. 

Contributor

I remember the teacher telling us about her in my sophmore year in high school in 1960. I wanted to be a part of the civil rights movement then. 

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Contributor

I see a woman who was probably tired both from her work day but mostly tired of Jim Crow.  She'd had enough and was brave -- so brave that she sat down in the front of the bus and refused to move. I can't imagine what it took because I'm white.  I am also Jewish which puts me at risk, but you can't tell by looking at me because I'm white -- I can hide.

Social Butterfly

I was meaning to participate but I forgot.

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A proud, determined lady who set an example for generations to come.

Contributor

I see a very strong lady who made accomplishments that no other could ever touch. 

Contributor

Rosa Parks was one brave lady!

Social Butterfly

This is hard for me in so many ways... (how can it be easy when you cannot trust anyone regarding COVID vaccine or status)

 

Mrs Parks sat for relief almost a year before I was born. She was strong, black and female, which at that point gave her the 3 times "wrong" moniker. 

 

10 years later, our parents and their friends brought this issue to their attention and they became strong advocates for equality (although, honestly, we did not understand this issue then).

 

At some point between 10 yrs old and 13, w/mom, cousin and aunt, a MS Highway Patrol person suggested we get out of Mississippi as we were bait for the ******...

 

I guess what I'm saying is first we have to do better, then we need to do right?

 

Thank you!

 

#StaySafe


#VegasStrong
Phil Harris, actor and showman, to John Fogerty of CCR: “If I’d known I’d live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.”
Regular Contributor

This photo is powerful.. I see a strong woman standing up for her rights and beliefs when racial equality wasnt a priority or consideration.

 

Social Butterfly

My memory of Rosa Park stood up for what is right. Rosa Park sat down on what she Believed in

Racquel Evans
Social Butterfly

Years before Rosa Parks was arrested for refusing to give up her bus seat to a white passenger, she was busy encouraging Black citizens to register to vote. Much like Stacey Abrams did in 2018-2020 Rosa Parks was doing the same thing in the 1940’s. It wasn’t an easy thing to do either in the Jim Crow era south. The tactics that were used to prevent Black people from registering to vote were very disheartening and very sad. And the beat goes on.

 

The successful Montgomery bus boycott was important to our National Civil Rights Movement. It brought financial distress to Montgomery and received a favorable ruling by the Supreme court that led to desegregation of public buses. In 2021 we still have several civil rights issues that need work.  

Social Butterfly

I didn’t post my comment above because of any contest. Guess I didn’t read the label close enough to realize this was a contest.

 

When I saw the photo of Miss Parks and was asked what recollections I had of her, I knew her activism didn’t begin and end that day she refused to give her seat up. She had been getting into good trouble most of her adult life.

 

So please withdraw my post from any contest. Thank you.

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I remember everyone being amazed at the boldness and yet afraid for what could have happened to this Black woman who stood up by sitting down. I realize some think we Black folks should get over it.  But I have to tell you, looking at this, even though it was an act spun from tired feet that turned into an act of bravery, even though it should not have mattered in light of all the empty seats available, even though good came from all the pain and I'm proud of what was accomplished,  it stills hurts my heart to look at this picture knowing there were those back then and even today, who believe we black people don't deserve the same opportunities.  And still we rise. Thank you Ms. Rosa for you and your tired feet.

Social Butterfly

Ms @ToniS570313 I so love your post because mine would be the same, except I'm not Black. Our family and friends (second and third gen, not orig white trash) honestly shared everything with everyone we cared for and valued. Honestly, until your post, in my 68 years I could not write that I didn't know there was this racism and ugliness until the National Guard showed up following Dr King's assassination... because someone would have to say "oh yes you did"; at my age I cannot and will not be able to do that...

 

My heart broke the first time I saw this photo of a human being actually mistreated and ostracized (not just by some "white" but also some non-white) but also because no one seemed to stand for her. NO ONE.

 

Eventually, hopefully, someone, everyone, will realize "hate", "bias", "...ism" needs to end. I so wish we could have accomplished this during our chance during the 70s, but we failed. Please keep up the "good fight"... and also know not everyone hated everyone when I was growing up.

 

Thank you!

 

#StaySafe


#VegasStrong
Phil Harris, actor and showman, to John Fogerty of CCR: “If I’d known I’d live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.”
Regular Contributor

I am a third-generation Washingtonian. In 1968 following the Martin Luther King Jr. assassination, Washington DC erupted in riots that would last for six days. It’s important to not forget how this city was transformed for six days but more importantly, how it pulled itself back together to be better than ever. I am lucky to be a witness to the steady advances in civil rights for minorities, women and Native Americans and more recent progress for the LGBTQ and trans communities. I was reminded how far we still need to go watching the attack on our Nation's capitol on January 6th. I am hopeful that Washington will again do the work begun by Rosa Parks and those who followed her lead to become that "shining city on the hill" I love as a model for the Nation.

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