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Community Manager
Community Manager

How can I avoid coronavirus (COVID-19) scams?

There seems to be plenty of scams going around during the pandemic. What should I be on the lookout for and how can I avoid being scammed?

 

 

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Community Manager
Community Manager

Scammers use coronavirus (COVID-19) headlines as opportunities to steal money or sensitive personal information. They will also seek to take advantage of our heightened levels of anxiety. 

Please be aware of the following coronavirus scams:

  • At this time, there is no vaccine, treatment, or cure for COVID-19. Ignore offers online or in stores that claim to offer treatment or cure.
  • Scammers are offering coronavirus testing to attempt to steal health insurance or Medicare information. Never provide your Medicare number to anyone but your own medical professionals. 
  • Scammers may call asking for bank information to deposit your “Trump dollars.” Please only follow the information on any financial support from a source you trust and that you can validate.
  • Scammers are making robocalls to offer air duct replacement to help keep coronavirus out of your home. This is a flat out scam.
  • Be on the lookout for requests for donations to help people affected by the coronavirus. Defer any decision to give a donation to a cause until you've researched it. Online options include charitynavigator.org and give.org.
  • Links or texts from sources you don't know could cause a malicious software virus to be download onto your device. Pause to consider the credibility of the source before you click.
  • Be suspicious of any emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or experts saying that they have breaking news information about the virus. Emails from local, state, or federal government entities will come from an address ending in .gov.

For more information from AARP go to Coronavirus Scams & Frauds.

For info on coronavirus-related scams from the Federal Trade Commission, visit ftc.gov/coronavirus.

View solution in original post

Community Manager
Community Manager

Scammers use coronavirus (COVID-19) headlines as opportunities to steal money or sensitive personal information. They will also seek to take advantage of our heightened levels of anxiety. 

Please be aware of the following coronavirus scams:

  • At this time, there is no vaccine, treatment, or cure for COVID-19. Ignore offers online or in stores that claim to offer treatment or cure.
  • Scammers are offering coronavirus testing to attempt to steal health insurance or Medicare information. Never provide your Medicare number to anyone but your own medical professionals. 
  • Scammers may call asking for bank information to deposit your “Trump dollars.” Please only follow the information on any financial support from a source you trust and that you can validate.
  • Scammers are making robocalls to offer air duct replacement to help keep coronavirus out of your home. This is a flat out scam.
  • Be on the lookout for requests for donations to help people affected by the coronavirus. Defer any decision to give a donation to a cause until you've researched it. Online options include charitynavigator.org and give.org.
  • Links or texts from sources you don't know could cause a malicious software virus to be download onto your device. Pause to consider the credibility of the source before you click.
  • Be suspicious of any emails claiming to be from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) or experts saying that they have breaking news information about the virus. Emails from local, state, or federal government entities will come from an address ending in .gov.

For more information from AARP go to Coronavirus Scams & Frauds.

For info on coronavirus-related scams from the Federal Trade Commission, visit ftc.gov/coronavirus.

View solution in original post