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Respected Social Butterfly
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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 1 of 9 (317 Views)

retiredtraveler wrote:

"...A snippet: "Also be careful when it comes to giving away information that could reveal clues about your passwords or other security information....".
I know we've stated this before, and may be preaching to the choir with the people that read this thread, but you have to get good passwords, ones you can't remember, and keep a list. Then, they need to be changed once in a while. You need at least 8 characters, a mix of caps and regular letters, some special characters, and numbers (assuming site allows for all this). As an example:
                         Zc*5a&b2 

 


@retiredtraveler Preach! Smiley Happy

 

You know I read something recently that said code cracking software is getting faster, so that breaking passwords shorter than 12 digits (actually maybe she said 16 digits ... hm) is becoming feasible. This author suggested pass phrases with memorable but unrelated words like starztwirlconcretecracks or, say, the first letter of each word in a line of poetry (using 3 for 'e' and 4 for 'for' and so on).

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 2 of 9 (325 Views)

"...A snippet: "Also be careful when it comes to giving away information that could reveal clues about your passwords or other security information....".
I know we've stated this before, and may be preaching to the choir with the people that read this thread, but you have to get good passwords, ones you can't remember, and keep a list. Then, they need to be changed once in a while. You need at least 8 characters, a mix of caps and regular letters, some special characters, and numbers (assuming site allows for all this). As an example:
                         Zc*5a&b2 

 


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
Respected Social Butterfly
Posts: 2,314
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

[ Edited ]
Message 3 of 9 (340 Views)

 

I'm not trying to discourage anyone trying to turn over a new leaf regarding their habits and practices on social media.  I'm just advocating a clear head and rational judgment when approaching personal and home security and discouraging a reflexive "the sky is falling" paranoia when the subject comes up...and it always does.  ~  JMO.


To that end, I refer interested parties to this article from 2015: http://www.choose.net/media/guide/features/internet-safety-sharing-personal-information.html

 

A snippet: "Also be careful when it comes to giving away information that could reveal clues about your passwords or other security information such as questions used to confirm your identity with your bank or other companies. High up on the list here are things like your mother's maiden name, the name of your first pet and the street you grew up on, among others.

 

above screenshot from the referenced articleabove screenshot from the referenced article

 

There is no stopping your information from being traded (in some cases posted) on the open market. Even if, like me, you have never had a cell phone, and do not post on social media (outside of this site and email). What you can do is monitor your accounts. That and stay current with /vigilant against the scam of the day. 

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 4 of 9 (401 Views)

@...@retiredtraveler Have you considered the possibility that your credit card was accessed by a breach of another source?  I had that situation with the main CC I use...a popular one from a multi-national company that woos travelers....".

 

Oh yes. As it turns out, this CC is used only for travel-related. My assumption is that someone got the number through a hotel reservation, airline, or another travel-related expense.

   As far as social media, I've posted before that I don't do social media, don't have a smart phone. We do use email extensively, which of course, is a form of social media. But that's it.

   Now, having said that, I do have another CC which is used for 99% of everything, including utility bills. That CC has never given me a problem, even though it's out there everywhere. I do that to get 2% cash back on everything we pay for. 

   Anyway, smart phone would be good for alerting us for fraud. I found out about this breach via email, which took some hours for me to discover. But we look at email several times a day, unless we're out traveling. Even then, it's daily.


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

[ Edited ]
Message 5 of 9 (407 Views)

@retiredtraveler Have you considered the possibility that your credit card was accessed by a breach of another source?  I had that situation with the main CC I use...a popular one from a multi-national company that woos travelers.

 

I've written about this before, but the culprit did it online.  Whether he was the buyer of information or the main perpetrator, I'll likely never know, but the information was obtained through a breach of my Verizon account from bad actors seeking to "harvest" sensitive information.  Verizon shares in the blame for leaving such information in a discoverable state for a short period of time.

 

I like the CC I use because they are diligent in prosecuting illegal usage and they are proactive in protecting their customer in most instances, as in my case, not allowing the charge to go through.  I was simultaneously notified via my land line and through a text on my cell phone.  The canceled the card immediately and re-issued another within minutes. The protected my liability for any charges and I was only inconvenienced by the notification and learning that my card was compromised.  They knew it was an unauthorized charge via a series of mechanisms that caused a mis-match of information that raised certain alarms.

                                                                  

                                                           ***************************

 

What follows is not directed to you, RT, but is a synopsis of my feelings and distrust of social media.  Accept it or reject it as the reader feels is warranted.

 

I do not participate in any social media except for posting on this particular website simply because I am aware of the subtle clues we leave...like Hansel & Gretel in the woods, when we engage with others on said media.  It's inevitable and we never know who's watching and collecting information for their future use.  Besides, I do not think the mundane issues in my life are of interest to anyone else except my immediate family.  To what end do I need to be my own publicist?  I'm a private citizen and I like it that way.

 

I know others often say it's a way to keep up with distant family members and share pictures. First of all, if I'm going to expose anyone  in pictures, I should obtain their permission first. Secondly, I would never post pictures of my grandchildren.  It's possible to trace them via GPS info.  So that leaves yours truly...and I'm not a slavish picture-taker nor a willing subject.

 

If you want to keep up with relatives and friends, what's wrong with a weekly phone call?  It takes less time and leaves more pleasure.  If you want to share pictures, why not stuff them in a greeting card and send them via the USPS?  It's a wonderful surprise for the recipients and gives them an immediate opportunity to frame one or more for display in their homes.

 

Same with LinkedIn...they are highly aggressive in promoting an ever-widening circle of colleagues and contacts.  No thank you.  I have no control on the other end, so I would be forced to do it the old fashioned way...personal networking  and shoe leather...and really, isn't that better than collecting a lot of names and faces?  I am retired and do not even consider limited work now, so what's the point?  I'm happy to be out of a rat race where one may feel compelled to join social media in order to leave his professional footprint.

 

Whatever information one decides to post on social media should be carefully evaluated for it's likelihood of falling into "the wrong hands."  It's a personal matter and entirely up to the individual who's going to be the most likely affected if things go awry.  Once they've made their choices, they have to live with them.  I don't think pets need to have aliases on social media, nor do I feel that showing a picture of one's home is such a terrible thing  Why??? Since a lot of information is available through public records, if you have an address, it takes all of 5 seconds to obtain an online map (with an accompanying photograph) directly to someone's front door!  Most burglaries and home invasions are not well-planned out before execution and a good security system with video cameras will go a long way to providing protection...if only to give you time to call 911 and if the security system hasn't already done it for you.  Likewise, having pictures of the interior...different room orientations, frequent re-models and change-ups in rooms for a particular purpose render photos obsolete very quickly.  It's not as if one is leaving a diagram for a potential predator.  These are usually not well-thought-out in advance unless the perpetrator is a stalker...in which case, you frequently know that beforehand and are able to take whatever precautions you and the police find necessary and desirable.

 

I'm not trying to discourage anyone trying to turn over a new leaf regarding their habits and practices on social media.  I'm just advocating a clear head and rational judgment when approaching personal and home security and discouraging a reflexive "the sky is falling" paranoia when the subject comes up...and it always does.  ~  JMO.

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 6 of 9 (419 Views)

Before anyone throw stones here about what other people post, maybe they need to look in the mirror first, and realize how much is available about them online, and the TMI they've shared about themselves.


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Respected Social Butterfly
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Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 7 of 9 (474 Views)

retiredtraveler wrote:

 

   So, the advice about monitoring your CC is spot on. If everyone is not aware, the major cards will let you set 'alert' parameters online so you're notified of specific transactions, or all, if you wish.


@retiredtraveler Ugh: sorry about your ccs. That stnks. Glad you monitor and caught the fraudulent activity, though.

 

Your story reminded me of the time some years back that DH's Paypal acct was breached. Someone bought a bunch of train tickets in England using his acct. Happily, that was quickly resolved, but yes, do monitor financial accounts!

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
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Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 8 of 9 (490 Views)

The credit card thing has given me some anxiety. Just yesterday, for the second time with this one CC company, I had several transactions come through that were not mine. So, for second time, CC is cancelled and I have to get a new card. I'm not out anything, but I don't know how someone got my card number.

   So, the advice about monitoring your CC is spot on. If everyone is not aware, the major cards will let you set 'alert' parameters online so you're notified of specific transactions, or all, if you wish.


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
Respected Social Butterfly
Posts: 2,314
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Fidelity's Tips For Preventing ID Theft

Message 9 of 9 (516 Views)

Just read this Fidelity article about common scams and methods to protect oneself. The scams are 1) Tax refund fraud; 2) Employment or health care fraud; 3) Fake charities; 4) Ransomware and 5) Credit card fraud. The author gives typical methods fraudsters use and suggests protection behaviors we can employ. Read the entire piece here: https://www.fidelity.com/viewpoints/personal-finance/preventing-identity-theft

 

This tip, under How To Protect Yourself is what I wanted to highlight: 

 

3. Guard your identity on social media.
Criminals can compile a surprising amount of information from social media that can open the door to identity theft. Birthdays, family names, schools, and similar details are often used in security questions to access financial accounts. Even photos can provide hints about your tastes, hobbies, and travels, which a crook can use to design a phishing attempt aimed directly at you.


Be careful about what you share.


Be aware that someone you know may use your identity to steal from you. Safeguard your personal information even from them.


Security measures aren’t foolproof, and anybody can suffer a moment of inattention or lapse in judgment. Nevertheless, awareness and basic prevention practices can protect you from the vast majority of attempts to steal your identity or money through fraudulent schemes.

 

Read the entire article here: https://www.fidelity.com/viewpoints/personal-finance/preventing-identity-theft

 

And here's my comment: I have seen plenty of frontal head and shoulder shots uploaded here. And plenty of photos with wide angles showing home interiors and exteriors.  I saw a picture here of someone's mailbox, address legible. I've seen a photo of the front a single woman's home. I feel these photos are security risks for those individuals. So too can be straight answers to things like favorite childhood memory, favorite pet's name, where did you work, et cetera. So are we to lie?

 

Here's what I say to that: Yes, but not here. I NEVER use the correct answer on security questions. For instance, if the security question is "What is the name of the street you grew up on?" I might answer "Dead Fish". Obviously, I did not grow up on Dead Fish Lane. If the security question is "What is your favorite athlete?" I might answer "Cabbage Rolls". Why do I do this? Two reasons: people who know me (the most likely, statistically, to try to steal your identify) probably know most of the answers to security questions. They will have greater difficulty guessing your untruthful answers. Also, this allows me to just be myself here. That said, I have been known to skew unimportant details when relaying a story here: I think that's a good compromise. Smiley Happy

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving