Penalties Loom for ACA Enrollees Who Don’t Switch to Medicare by Sept. 30. Read More

Reply
Community Manager
Posts: 1,422
Registered: ‎10-09-2007

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 1 of 22 (961 Views)

@es14589767

It’s true that AARP employees are not allowed to participate in any sweepstakes or contests sponsored by the organization.   What you’re referencing is auctions.  Employees can participate in these, however they do not have any special privileges.  They don’t get extra points for this.  They have to earn points the same way all participants do.  The users that are bidding with the high points are not employees.  As participants win the auctions, they’re accounts are reviewed to ensure they’re not fraudulent.

 

As a reminder, the experience with auctions was changed to help AARP deliver an industry best practice experience with our auctions.  I believe you will see the top bids coming down over the next several weeks as those who have the large point values spend down their points.  Please give it some time to level out.

 

I also wanted to highlight a benefit of this new auction experience.  An auction bidder is now able to walk away from the computer and the system will continue to bid for them.  You don’t have to sit and hit the bid button over and over again.  They system automatically bids for the user up to their max bid.  The user also gets an email notification when their max bid has been outbid.

 

Thank you for taking the time to share your feedback with our Rewards for Good Auctions.

AARPTeri
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

NEW Work Around in Rewards for Good

Message 2 of 22 (997 Views)

OK. SO. The past two days, the recipes search tool has ot been loading. While this may or ma not be something particular to my system (doubtful) I wanted to post a workaround in case it is happening to others. The recipes seach tool gives 30 points daily, which is 900 monthly and 10,950 points annually. Smiley Happy

 

1 Open your R4G account.

2 Use the search feature in the upper right corner and input 'recipes', as before.

3 Only DO NOT select the top hit. (the recipe database is not loading properly through this link)

4 Select the second hit, let the page load and select 'recipes' in the upper left corner of the article.

5 Perform your recipe search as before, collect your points. Grin all the way to the redemption center. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎07-25-2015

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

[ Edited ]
Message 3 of 22 (940 Views)

@AARPTeri You just stated  "To clarify, AARP employees are not allowed to participate in any sweepstakes or contests sponsored by the organization."   But on ‎12-21-2016 10:17 AM You posted that AARP employees participate in the Auctions as stated in THIS POST:  "AARP employees have no more advantage in auctions than any other AARP member. AARP employees are AARP members and are encouraged to use all of the products, services and programs."  Also several AARP members have called in and received confirmation that AARP employees do partitpate in the auctions.

 

FYI: Yes an AARP employee is at an unfair advantage over regular AARP members: as an AARP employee they will have quick access to what items to bid on, inside information on how to quickly acquire points and a faster network connection that will enable them to bid faster than regular AARP members.  AARP employees do not need to profit off this program in order to better provide tech or phone support for the program, anyone with a tech support background knows this.

 

Most company's that have rewards programs have ethical guidelines that greatly limit or forbid their own employees from profiting off these programs and auditing procedures to guarantee that these guidelines are being met.  Furthermore, many companies have completely separate employee rewards and bonus systems in place to prevent the unethical temptation for employee profiteering that you confirmed AARP employees are engaged in. 

 

If AARP is going to allow this unethical behavior to continue then in the bidding history for each auction AARP must disclose which bids were placed by a regular AARP members or an "AARP employee/member."  For every auction winner AARP should come clean and disclose if the auction winner was a regular AARP member or an "AARP employee/member."  And again it would be best if AARP took the moral high ground and discontinued the unethical practice of allowing AARP employees to profit from this program.

 

Also if AARP employees are going to continue to profit from the reward for goods program then I believe the program needs a full audit so the extent of employee profitteering is known by all AARP members.

 

 

Community Manager
Posts: 1,422
Registered: ‎10-09-2007

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 4 of 22 (1,047 Views)

@HokiePoq   We’re sorry for your frustrations with the new Rewards for Good auction bidding functionality. Your feedback is a vital part of improving the program. Our technical team has been monitoring and reviewing the auctions bids to ensure that no fraudulent activity is happening. We review every account before awarding the prize.   To clarify, AARP employees are not allowed to participate in any sweepstakes or contests sponsored by the organization.

 

 

AARPTeri
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

[ Edited ]
Message 5 of 22 (1,050 Views)

@es14589767 Just want to point out, because your comment links to a post that questions whether it is possible to accrue big R4G points, that indeed it is. As stated elsewhere in this thread, I have 630,000 points, have been participating in R4G for nigh onto 3 years. I am not now nor have I ever been an AARP employee. Smiley Happy I don't bother with the auctions because they have always seemed rigged and unfair to me. Actually, to be frank, the auctions seem like a waste of resources. Let me explain:

 

If one uses points for gift cards, merch and travel, those points end up being worth so much more. For instance, a person may bid 75,000 points for a $10 Walmart gift card at auction, but they would only have to pay 500 points to get $5 off a $50 CVS gift card. Note that when buying gift cards outright, every 1000 points is valued at 10 bucks. This, then, means that the person winning the above mentioned auction paid the equivalent of $750 for that $10 Walmart card. This, I think, is insanity.

cvs pharm gc.png

 

 

 

Granted, 10% is a paltry excuse for a discount (get real AARP) however, as far as points go, spending 3 days of Rewards for Good points earnings on a $10 Walmart card is likewise unappealing. To me.

 

I've posted tips on how to earn more points; here's hoping you are soon swimming in rewards points. Smiley Happy

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Highlighted
Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-28-2008

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 6 of 22 (1,057 Views)

I had no idea employees were in these auctions.  Every contest, etc. I've ever seen has excluded its own employees.  Besides any unfair advantage, during work hours employees should not be watching the computer to click at the last minute, get daily deals, etc.   

I imagine the key is in the technology.   While the rest of us are locked out after doing an activity once, someone could reset accounts allowing multiple logins, quizzes, and whatever else is limited.  Being a member and getting discounts and participating in insurance programs and the like is not the same as competing against regular members in contests and auctions.  Before I retired I didn't have time to spend so much time with the computer.   It would be very interesting to see who the winners of the really big packages are.  Even if nothing out of order is being done, participation in contests and auctions gives the appearance of impropriety.

 

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 50
Registered: ‎02-28-2008

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 7 of 22 (1,059 Views)

I had no idea employees were in these auctions.  Every contest, etc. I've ever seen has excluded its own employees.  Besides any unfair advantage, during work hours employees should not be watching the computer to click at the last minute, get daily deals, etc.   

I imagine the key is in the technology.   While the rest of us are locked out after doing an activity once, someone could reset accounts allowing multiple logins, quizzes, and whatever else is limited.  Being a member and getting discounts and participating in insurance programs and the like is not the same as competing against regular members in contests and auctions.  Before I retired I didn't have time to spend so much time with the computer.   It would be VERY interesting to see who the winners of the really big packages are.

 

Bronze Conversationalist
Posts: 17
Registered: ‎01-29-2015

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 8 of 22 (1,067 Views)

Thank you for the KudosSmiley Happy

Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 36
Registered: ‎07-25-2015

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

Message 9 of 22 (1,077 Views)

I am still waiting on AARP to disclose which bidders and winners are AARP employees!  It's sad that the same people who are tasked with helping AARP members are also bidding against AARP members in the auction process and I believe we can trace these new auction changes to these same AARP employees who are profiting off the auction system!  If AARP wants to reward their employees some way they should do so with a system that is completely separate from the AARP Rewards for Good Program. The ethical thing to do would be to create a separate Employee Rewards Program so there is no chance of AARP employee profiteering!  But if they cannot do this then I feel AARP must disclose which winners are AARP Employees, also  the bidding history should indicate which bids were placed by AARP employees.  

 

‎Don't believe me? On 12/21/2016 AARPteri admitted that AARP employees are participating and profiting from the Auction process: Re: AARP employees involved in Rewards For Good Auctions?

 

Below is the 12/21/2016 confirmation by AARPteri of employee profiteering in the auction process and my response to this unethical behavior:

 

 

 

Capture1.JPG

Capture2.JPG

 

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Changes in Auctions Lock Out Those Who Don't Know the Secret

[ Edited ]
Message 10 of 22 (1,091 Views)

@dg1070 It does take some time to learn how to navigate the forums.

 

As of this writing, this thread has been viewed 181 times.  

 

Some posts/topics/thread get lots of views, others do not. I think it has something to do with the title, the tags and if AARP includes a link to a thread in one of their emailed newsletters. And of course interest. Smiley Happy

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving