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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 1 of 8 (502 Views)

@Prosecco6247 - My feeling is that many of our parents & grandparents had "old stuff", but while it had a lot of sentimental value, little of it was truly antique & in good enough condition to be worth a lot. In my grandparents' house, we had 4 hardwood iceboxes .. the kind that can be refinished & sold for $400+ each  .. an antique dealer offered my Mom $25 for all 4 of them! When I had a sale in 2002 with things from grandma, Mom & my aunt, that covered my entire large basement, the ad in the regional newspaper cost me close to $500; maybe today there are ways to advertise for a lot less online. I needed a friend or two to keep an eye on that large space, and one friend caught a couple trying to switch price tags! I had the sale for Saturday & Sunday; I made a little money, but I'm not sure it was worth the effort. I took some really old records & old books to dealers .. nothing was either old enough, in perfect enough condition, or popular enough for them to even make an offer! Everything left over went to Salvation Army and Goodwill. Surprisingly, very old ladies hats & evening bags were snapped up by a vintage clothing store .. but no "killings" there either.


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Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

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Message 2 of 8 (524 Views)

If you have a lot of time, patience and the spirit of an entrepreneur, you can probably come away from a job like this with lots of extra $$$.  Time is money, however.  If you are working and with little free time, it might be easier to donate the stuff you have (or inherited) and take the deduction...especially if it's the ordinary garden variety "stuff."

 

For someone who's nearing the point of "downsizing" or moving to an independent living facility, your best bet is to gather your children and ask them if there is anything they would like to have, then give it to them then and there, or keep it only until they can arrange transport to their home, if need be.  Don't "hold" it for them for an extended period.  They will tell you, "Oh, why don't you enjoy it, there's no rush!"  Yes, there is!  You are on a mission and if you don't get it done now, you may never have the chance to do so.  Set a firm time limit and tell them that after that, it's gone.

 

Then, be very critical of your belongings.  Save only that which brings you joy and which you've used recently.  Pare down your wardrobe to the few essential and interchangeable pieces you wear most often and have a couple of dressier outfits to augment them.  Same for jewelry.  If you have fine jewelry, go ahead and give it to the people you have designated as you are paring down.  They will enjoy it for a longer period of time and you will enjoy seeing them wear it.  Save your favorite pieces that you normally wear and place a letter in your will to designate the people who will receive the pieces after your death.  Since they don't want silver and china any more, instruct in your will that these be sold at auction and the proceeds divided among your heirs along with other money in your estate...that is, if you don't want the cash while you're still living!

 

I'm sure there are other great ideas out there, but the bottom line is exactly what the title of the  topic states...nobody wants your stuff!  (I know you love it but get over it!  Woman Wink )

 

 

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 3 of 8 (550 Views)

dopaki wrote:

After my Dad died and my Mom moved to a smaller place, my brother and sisters and I spent weeks divying up everything we wanted (value & sentiment). Then it was left to me to finish the job. Two years later I am still getting rid of stuff. Surprisingly, between ebay, craigslist, and the local flea market I have managed to avoid throwing away 75% of what was left. I have not only had fun, but made a bit of cash to boot. In fact, there are lots of collectors out there who do want your parents stuff - it is just a matter of finding them. 


Wow  two years..  congrats on doing all the work that you have done!

 

I worked with a woman whose mom passed away out of state.  She went there and got a trailer and hauled all of the stuff back to her home.  She put the trailer on the property and left it.  Her plan was to go through it when she retired.  She started sooner than that as her SO wanted the stuff cleaned up. She had a company come in and take some of it and had some yard sales for more but when she retired she still had quite a lot to do.  I hope she got through it all : )

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 4 of 8 (564 Views)

After my Dad died and my Mom moved to a smaller place, my brother and sisters and I spent weeks divying up everything we wanted (value & sentiment). Then it was left to me to finish the job. Two years later I am still getting rid of stuff. Surprisingly, between ebay, craigslist, and the local flea market I have managed to avoid throwing away 75% of what was left. I have not only had fun, but made a bit of cash to boot. In fact, there are lots of collectors out there who do want your parents stuff - it is just a matter of finding them. 

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Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 5 of 8 (635 Views)

WebWiseWoman wrote:

Great point for all of us!

 

I began my journey to owning nothing but what I need to live comfortably about 10 years ago, after having to short sell; major give aways just to get it gone.

 

Everything is now digital when possible (books, music, etc). Car, sofa, bed, that's about it now and Goodwill will pick those up gladly.

 

 


My hardest is the books that I have kept but yes this message has been discussed here before many times.  Don't leave a mess for your kids.  Ask them now if there is anything that they would like.. give it to them now if you like but all the rest should be pared down.  

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Regular Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎05-25-2009

Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 6 of 8 (643 Views)

Great point for all of us!

 

I began my journey to owning nothing but what I need to live comfortably about 10 years ago, after having to short sell; major give aways just to get it gone.

 

Everything is now digital when possible (books, music, etc). Car, sofa, bed, that's about it now and Goodwill will pick those up gladly.

 

 

Phil Harris, actor and showman, to John Fogerty of CCR: “If I’d known I’d live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself.”
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Re: Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 7 of 8 (657 Views)

8 Tips for Home Unfurnishing

 

There are tips for disposing all this stuff at the end of the article!

 

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

Message 8 of 8 (662 Views)

Sorry, Nobody Wants Your Parents' Stuff

 

After my father died at 94 in September, leaving my sister and me to empty his one-bedroom, independent living New Jersey apartment, we learned the hard truth that others in their 50s and 60s need to know: Nobody wants the prized possessions of your parents — not even you or your kids.

Admittedly, that’s an exaggeration. But it’s not far off, due to changing tastes and homes. I’ll explain why, and what you can do as a result, shortly.

http://www.nextavenue.org/nobody-wants-parents-stuff/

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith