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Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: DNA testing

Message 41 of 50 (1,701 Views)

@MaVolta  Fascinating to backtrack one's family migrations, isn't it? All the more so with the tool of DNA testing. It's really something to imagine the day-to-day of our ancestors as suggested by genealogical research. Some heartbreaking details emerge from those old documents.

 

As for our red hair, we are from a clan of extreme northerners --think Orkney-- so I wonder if there's a resilient throwback gene from the Vikings/Russians in the mix. The truth of that I may never know. Interestingly, my siblings who had children had mostly blondes with blue eyes.  There's a redhead with brown eyes, but the rest have blue eyes. 

 

 

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Recognized Social Butterfly
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Re: DNA testing

Message 42 of 50 (1,627 Views)
Epster wrote:

@MaVolta So your family thought they had more Scots blood than they did, eh? I find it frustrating that 23andme considers Scots to be 'British-Irish'. Does the Ancestry report not break out Scots blood either? 

  

According to Ancestry, the part designated as Ireland is where my Scottish people are. They could also be in the British Isles mix, as well.

 

I know that my father's paternal line is a common Scottish surname, and the immigrant ancestor was from the Ulster plantation. I found it interesting that these immigrants were initially called "Irish" immigrants because of whence they came. It wasn't until later that Americans began to differentiate the Scots-Irish from the Irish. I read a book on the cultural history of the "Scotch-Irish" and found it remarkably fitting. Yes, it described this family to a tee!

 

On my mother's side, her paternal line came directly from Scotland and intermarried with other known Scottish immigrants (save one that was truly Irish) up until 19th century, when a French and then German line was added to the tree. 

 

I enjoyed reading about the red-heads in the other topic. All of those Scottish origins, and nary a red-head in our family. I'll have to explore that further. 

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: DNA testing

Message 43 of 50 (1,548 Views)

One of the things I find endlessly fascinating about DH and my DNA reports is that we have nearly identical ethnic make up, and our haplogroups are related, however we share not one segment of identical DNA. 

 

Our forebearers were separatists, one surmises. Smiley Happy

 

 

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Trusted Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: DNA testing

Message 44 of 50 (1,506 Views)

MaVolta wrote:

I had the Ancestry DNA test, and the results were not too surprising, although I had expected a strong hit on Scotland and didn't get it. We had always been told that we were "Scotch-Irish" (that's what they called it back then). Then I uploaded the Ancestry file to Family Tree DNA, and got a completely different breakdown. 

 

Ancestry results - British Isles 50%, Ireland 23%, Europe West 18%, + Trace Regions as Iberian Peninsula 5%, Europe East 1%, Italy/Greece < 1%, Scandinavia < 1%, West Asia/Caucasus < 1%.

 

FT-DNA results - Scandinavia 38%, British Isles 24%, Southern Europe 20%, Western/Central Europe 19%.

 

I have been able to trace immigrant ancestors from Scotland, Ireland, England, Germany, and France. The ones I haven't traced are probably from England, or Germany or Netherlands by way of England. Some of my English ones are known to have Norman-French roots. So I'd say either table could represent those migrations. I think that the Ancestry table gives a good representation of migration by the Celts. I read the book Saxons, Vikings, and Celts - The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland by Bryan Sykes. The results tie fairly well to what the book says. 

 

Also, you can upload your DNA results to GEDMatch.com and find some interesting information, and other opportunities for finding cousins. I may do the 23andme just to see if it will match either of the other tests, or turn out different. 


@MaVolta So your family thought they had more Scots blood than they did, eh? I find it frustrating that 23andme considers Scots to be 'British-Irish'. Does the Ancestry report not break out Scots blood either? 

 

DH's family thinks they are far more German than they are. Or did. His DNA test disabused them of that notion.

 

I'll have to check out the Sykes book. Should be informative reading. Thanks! (Reference material is right up my alley!)

 

The only surprise for me, really, was the Algonquin. I knew when I was being told as a kid that my maternal Fr Canadian grandmother was part Cherokee and that she'd run away with the circus that Dad was spinning a tale. She was the first American on that side of the family and we were a band of redheads. Not that redheads can't be Indian, but we also had the telltale white skin and freckles of Anglo descendants, and zero family anywhere with darker skin than a sunburn. So I was surprised to see the Indian blood in the report. An elder sister, who knew our maternal grandpa far better than did I, says he told her Grandma's Indian blood was Algonquin. And it checks out, for Ontario is home to Algonquins.

 

I'd be interested in uploading an ancestry file for more details. 23and me doesn't provide a way to do that, I don't think. I will check around some more at 23andme, but a cursory search turned up nada. 

 

 

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Recognized Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎10-09-2009

Re: DNA testing

Message 45 of 50 (1,513 Views)

I had the Ancestry DNA test, and the results were not too surprising, although I had expected a strong hit on Scotland and didn't get it. We had always been told that we were "Scotch-Irish" (that's what they called it back then). Then I uploaded the Ancestry file to Family Tree DNA, and got a completely different breakdown. 

 

Ancestry results - British Isles 50%, Ireland 23%, Europe West 18%, + Trace Regions as Iberian Peninsula 5%, Europe East 1%, Italy/Greece < 1%, Scandinavia < 1%, West Asia/Caucasus < 1%.

 

FT-DNA results - Scandinavia 38%, British Isles 24%, Southern Europe 20%, Western/Central Europe 19%.

 

I have been able to trace immigrant ancestors from Scotland, Ireland, England, Germany, and France. The ones I haven't traced are probably from England, or Germany or Netherlands by way of England. Some of my English ones are known to have Norman-French roots. So I'd say either table could represent those migrations. I think that the Ancestry table gives a good representation of migration by the Celts. I read the book Saxons, Vikings, and Celts - The Genetic Roots of Britain and Ireland by Bryan Sykes. The results tie fairly well to what the book says. 

 

Also, you can upload your DNA results to GEDMatch.com and find some interesting information, and other opportunities for finding cousins. I may do the 23andme just to see if it will match either of the other tests, or turn out different. 

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: DNA testing

Message 46 of 50 (1,503 Views)

My ancestry timeline.png

 

 

This is a new feature from 23andme. It confirms what my sister and I have already deduced regarding those 3 drops of American Indian blood (they are actually Canadian Algonquin), for the timeline of when that DNA appears coincides with when a male relative on the maternal side left the family enclave in Ontario, Canada for Manitoba, Canada, the province in which my maternal grandmother was born. She is also the source of my Basque and French blood.

 

Only guessing that this man's marriage to an Algonquin created family strife and he chose to move away, for the rest of the family remains --to this day-- in Ontario. 

 

The paternal side is the source of the Scandinavian and later the Scots blood, delineated here as 'British & Irish'. I'm curious about the break in the timeline, wondering what that might mean.

 

I'm reposting this from another thread, but here's a breakdown of the ethnic make up of one of my siblings and myself. As you can see, we inherited slightly different DNA. 

 

 

Me & MEM ethnicity report EXPANDED.png

 

 

 

 

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Trusted Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: DNA testing

[ Edited ]
Message 47 of 50 (1,459 Views)

One interesting thing that came of getting this test done, was that in sharing results with my paternal half-brother and a full-blooded sister, we could see that we sisters share the same barely-there amount of Indian blood. Which was beyond interesting, for our father (less than trustworthy) would sometimes talk about our Cherokee blood. Something we never believed, in part because said blood line was maternal and our father never told the truth about that side ot the family. So, even when he later abandoned me on an Indian reservation, I always told people that I was a 4th gen American Scot, and 0 percent Indian.

 

After comparing our DNA reports and family stories (this older sister ran away from home about 3 years before I was abandoned on the rez), then in researching the family tree, we discovered that indeed we do have about 3 drops of Canadian Algonquin. 

 

 

 

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Trusted Social Butterfly
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Re: DNA testing

[ Edited ]
Message 48 of 50 (1,349 Views)

retiredtraveler wrote:

This is one instance I have to disagree with you. I believe most of the DNA testing is akin to the proverbial 'snake oil salesman'.

   There is no, complete, worldwide database of DNA. According to what I've read, one will get different results from different companies because they don't access the same databases.
   Also, if you've studied DNA dispersal, you'll know autosomnal DNA is randomly passed on and you will not be able to determine your genetic origin after a half dozen generations due to mutations and selective genetic codes being carried.
  No, this is mostly nonsense. There has been so much co-mingling of genes through the centuries that it simply cannot be true to adequately, and accurately, tell where you came from. Talk to someone in the field of genetics.


Disagreement is a good and healthy thing. This is how we as a species progress to new levels. So yay! Smiley Happy

 

It is early yet, I think, to discredit this emerging science. True, the sampling size thus far is minuscule. And while I do have access to my father's DNA via a half-brother's sample, 23andme does not, as yet, have a way to reliably extract paternal data from a close male relative's DNA and intertwine it with a female's maternal DNA data ... but ... oddly enough, in this case I've decided to be an early adopter. Smiley Happy

 

Truth is, the 17 drops of Basque blood has been supported by my work on the family tree. The Viking blood (not delineated as such in the report, btw) is suggested by my Scots clan history and the known history of my grandmother. DH would state he's seen it in my eyes from time to time. Smiley Happy 

 

viking me.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 6,676
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: DNA testing

Message 49 of 50 (1,069 Views)

This is one instance I have to disagree with you. I believe most of the DNA testing is akin to the proverbial 'snake oil salesman'.

   There is no, complete, worldwide database of DNA. According to what I've read, one will get different results from different companies because they don't access the same databases.
   Also, if you've studied DNA dispersal, you'll know autosomnal DNA is randomly passed on and you will not be able to determine your genetic origin after a half dozen generations due to mutations and selective genetic codes being carried.
  No, this is mostly nonsense. There has been so much co-mingling of genes through the centuries that it simply cannot be true to adequately, and accurately, tell where you came from. Talk to someone in the field of genetics.


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,495
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

DNA testing

[ Edited ]
Message 50 of 50 (797 Views)

DH and I had 23andme's DNA testing service run our saliva through their 'magic bean machine' last year. Many family stories about our heritage were confirmed, but there were a few surprises as well. (Woo hoo! I really AM part gypsy! And those Viking heritage stories? Apparently true!)

 

So I'm wondering if anyone here has had their DNA tested, and what they thought of the results. Are you involved in the 23andme community? I mean, what of those requests to share DNA results with 5th and 6th cousins (AKA total strangers)? Have you done it? Was it beneficial to your research or understanding of yourself? 

 

23andme.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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