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Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 27,219
Registered: ‎02-21-2014

Re: From "This Week in Hate"

Message 31 of 53 (130 Views)

For awhile we had constant updates of all the "victims" shot by the police including those shot while shooting at the police.

 

And now a new one - "This Week in Hate".

 

The anti-American hatred just rolls on for some.

Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 27,219
Registered: ‎02-21-2014

Re: From "This Week in Hate"

Message 32 of 53 (131 Views)

Centristsin2010 wrote:

A High School Defaced With ‘Trump’ and Swastikas


 
People rallied in support of students at Withrow University High School after their campus was vandalized.CreditKareem Elgazzar/The Cincinnati Enquirer

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of Donald Trump.

 

When Alandes Powell arrived at her son’s high school on Sunday, she saw a swastika and the word “Trump” spray-painted on a building. On benches and a sign at the school’s new baseball field, she saw more graffiti, including racist and homophobic slurs.

 

A friend had alerted Ms. Powell to the vandalism at Withrow University High School in Cincinnati, where her son is a senior and football player. Her first reaction was anger. “You want education to be a safe place,” she said. “These kids are just growing into who they want to be.”

 

She wondered if the school, which serves a predominantly African-American student body in a white neighborhood, had been targeted because football players, including her son, Julian, took a knee during the national anthem before games in the fall to protest police killings of African American people.

 

Police are still investigating the vandalism, which they believe was committed late Saturday night.

 

They have released a surveillance image of a suspect.

 

Meanwhile, other schools in the area are showing their support for Withrow, with students making banners and wearing orange, one of Withrow’s colors, to school and to games. “We play in a league of mostly white schools,” said Ms. Powell, and “they have all just embraced us.”

 

She believes the election of President Trump has made people more comfortable expressing racist views. But, she explained, the vandalism at Withrow has brought a new sense of unity to Cincinnati that crosses racial lines. “We’re going to be greater than great,” she said.

 

Here are some reports of hate crimes and harassment that have drawn public attention in recent days.

 

• A man has been charged with reckless endangerment and menacingfor allegedly brandishing a gun and using racist language in an argument with a taxi driver in New Paltz, N.Y., on Sunday.

 

• Last Wednesday, as many as 27 Jewish community centers around the country received bomb threats. For some, it was the second threat in two weeks — 16 facilities had received bomb threats on January 9.

• The Belmont County Republican Party headquarters in St. Clairsville, Ohio, was vandalized on Sunday with the message “stop Trump.”

 

• On Saturday, a liquor store in Newtown, Conn., was robbed, set on fire and vandalized with swastikas and an anti-Semitic message. Local police are investigating and have notified federal authorities.

 

• A man has been charged with a hate crime for allegedly shouting a racial slur at a Catholic priest of Nigerian descent and threatening him with a baseball bat in Brooklyn on January 13.

 

• Last Wednesday, graffiti including a swastika and the word “Trump” was found at a public library in Northbrook, Ill. Local police are investigating the graffiti, and several similar incidents of vandalism at the library since the election, as possible hate crimes.

 

Anti-Semitic messages and drawings were found throughout a building on the University of Maryland, Baltimore County on January 14. Campus police are investigating the vandalism as a hate crime.

 

• On January 16, a sign reading “diversity is a code word for white genocide,” was placed outside Parkside Middle School in Manchester, N.H. The sign has been removed, and police are investigating the incident. A similar sign was found outside Webster Elementary School, also in Manchester.

 

• A mosque in Davis, Calif., was vandalized on Sunday, with windows broken, bicycles parked outside damaged and strips of bacon placed on a door handle. Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

 

If you have experienced, witnessed or read about a hate crime or incident of bias or harassment, you can use this form to send information about the incident to This Week in Hate and other partners in the Documenting Hate project. The form is not a report to law enforcement or any government agency. These resources may be helpful for people who have experienced harassment. If you witness harassment, here are some tips for responding. You can contact This Week in Hate at weekinhate@nytimes.com.

Correction: January 25, 2017

An earlier version of this story misspelled, in some instances, the name of the high school in Cincinnati that was vandalized on Saturday. It is Withrow University High School, not Wilford.

Continue reading the main story

I sure hope they catch that left wing radical that defaced that school by spray painting the sort of nonsense that some of our more radical posters post every day.

Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 27,219
Registered: ‎02-21-2014

Re: From "This Week in Hate"

Message 33 of 53 (131 Views)

ChasKy53 wrote:

rk9152 wrote:

I cannot understand constant negativity but I do pity those who suffer from it.

So then  you pitied those who suffered from "constant negativity" for eight years about Obama and the Left  Oh, excuse me, the "Loony Left", the "Less Wise", the "Demodupes"? 


I think, or at least I hope, you realize that those were terms used in response to others. E.g. - Demodupes was a response to GOPerDupes.

 

None of that has to do with the plight of those so overwhelmed by the last election that they are in a state of permanent negativity.

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,162
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Re: Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

Message 34 of 53 (120 Views)

What It Feels Like When a Mosque Is Threatened

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of President Trump.

 

On the day the threat arrived, the congregation of Masjid Bilal Ibn Rabah had planned a potluck dinner.

 

Earlier that afternoon — March 4 — the president of the mosque in Lexington, Ky., found an envelope in the mail from Sheffield, England. Inside was a green index card that read, “An explosive device will be placed at your mosque very soon.”

 

Waheedah Muhammad, who worships at the mosque, was shocked when she heard about the threat. The congregation is not used to threats and has a strong relationship with the surrounding community. Prior to the threat, neighbors and others had sent the mosque notes of support and donations — a Sunday school class even sent the mosque love notes. “It was just so bizarre that this would happen here where we have a sense — maybe a false sense — of security,” said Ms. Muhammad, who is also the Kentucky chairwoman of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

 

Masjid Bilal Ibn Rabah is one of more than a dozen mosques to receive threats since January, according to reports collected by the council. Threats, vandalism and other forms of discrimination targeting mosques in the United States have risen in recent years, from 39 in 2014 to 139 in 2016. The council has also found a more than 50 percent increase in incidents of bias against American Muslims between 2015 and 2016.

 

The Greenview Madani Center, in Lawrenceville, Ga., a suburb of Atlanta, received a handwritten letter reading, “death is waiting for you and your kind” in the mail late last month. Three other mosques in the Atlanta area, and two in Alabama, received emailed threats in February, warning of attacks on Muslims on March 15.

 

The F.B.I. and local law enforcement agents are investigating the threatening letters and emails to mosques, and police officers in Englandare also investigating the threat against the Kentucky mosque.

 

The threats against mosques came as Jewish community centers and other Jewish organizations experienced wave after wave of bomb threats, 134 since Jan. 1. Muslim and Jewish groups have offered one another support as both are targeted; an interfaith group held a prayer rally at a Jewish community center in Birmingham, Ala., last month as an expression of support for Muslims and Jews.

 

Meanwhile, every mosque should have security cameras, lock its doors or appoint someone to stand guard during daily prayers and post an armed guard during Friday services, said Edward Ahmed Mitchell, the executive director of the Georgia chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

While large mosques are accustomed to receiving occasional threats, said Mr. Mitchell, smaller mosques like Greenview may be more rattled by the experience. But overall, most Muslims are responding to the threats with defiance: “Whether anti-Muslim bigots are writing emails from a dark basement or writing policy from down the hall from the Oval Office, they’re not going to scare us away from being proudly and publicly Muslim.”

 

Concerns about Islamophobia have been rising among congregants at Greenview since President Trump began his campaign, according to Azam Syed, who worships at the mosque. Many congregants are immigrants, and some are from the six countries affected by the president’s new executive order immigration. Mr. Syed criticized the president for failing to speak out against Islamophobia in the United States or against the attack on a Quebec City mosque that killed six people in January.

 

The Greenview center is raising money to fence its property and install security cameras. Several mosques in the Atlanta area will host open houses on Saturday so that community members can learn more about Muslims and their religion.

 

“A lot of people might drive past the mosque every day,” said Aisha Yaqoob, who lives in the Atlanta area and is the policy director for the advocacy group Asian Americans Advancing Justice. “Just come inside and see what it’s all about.”

 

On March 4, the potluck dinner at Masjid Bilal Ibn Rabah went on as planned. While Ms. Muhammad is encouraging congregants to be security-conscious and report anything unusual they notice, she also urges them, “continue to come to the mosque, continue to bring your children to the Sunday school. Let’s keep living as we live.”

 

This Week in Hate....What It Feels Like When a Mosque Is Threatened


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 13,559
Registered: ‎03-20-2009

Re: Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

Message 35 of 53 (194 Views)

   And then there is data.     The RW is more than willing to make nonsense talking points about N=1 and ignores the bigger picture:

 

   

 

     doesn't that mean that crime amongst Muslims is good for the Crime Rate, because it is actually lower that all those "born in the USA"?   

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,162
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Re: Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

[ Edited ]
Message 36 of 53 (214 Views)

MIseker wrote:


Republicans refuse to call these kinds of people thugs..they call them Republicans Smiley Happy

 

They are his and President Bannon's most reliable supporters.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
Respected Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,955
Registered: ‎11-18-2009

Re: Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

Message 37 of 53 (216 Views)

Centristsin2010 wrote:

‘Let’s Become Great Again,’ the Flyers Said

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of President Trump.

 

Growing up in Mississippi in the 1960s, Prof. Valerie Grim was only too familiar with racism. So when she discovered flyers from a white nationalist group posted outside her office at Indiana University Bloomington, she wasn’t intimidated.

 

Instead, she was curious about what had led someone to post flyers depicting Michelangelo’s David along with the phrase “Let’s become great again” and the name of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group, outside offices in the university’s department of African-American and African diaspora studies. The group’s name, symbol and Twitter handle were also written on the whiteboard on Prof. Grim’s door.

 

“This is someone who really got a wrong view of history,” says Professor Grim, who teaches African-American history. She wishes she could invite those responsible for the flyers into her office for a conversation: “Don’t hide behind a flyer. Come in, let’s talk.”

 

Identity Evropa is one of several groups that appeared last year, seemingly in response to President Trump’s candidacy, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. The number of hate groups operating in the United States rose from 892 in 2015 to 917 in 2016, the center reported on Wednesday.

 

Identity Evropa has ties to other white nationalist groups in the United States and abroad. The founder of the group, Nathan Damigo, attended the summit of the National Policy Institute, the white nationalist group run by Richard Spencer, in Washington in November. Identity Evropa has ideological similarities to anti-Muslim “identitarian” movements in Europe, and links to identitarian literature on its website.

 

The main activity of the group is posting flyers on college campuses. The flyers have appeared on more than two dozen campuses in 2017, including the University of Chicago and the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Other white nationalist groups have also posted flyers around the country recently. Last week, flyers reading “Make America White Again” and including the web address of The Right Stuff, a white nationalist group, were discovered in mailboxes and on driveways in Norwalk, Conn. And printers at Stanford, Vanderbilt and the University of California, Berkeley, printed anti-Semitic flyers last month, probably as the result of hacking.

 

When white supremacist flyers show up on campus, university officials should not respond by cracking down on student speech or by ignoring the incident, says Heidi Beirich, director of the intelligence project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. Instead, they should clearly and forcefully denounce the views expressed on the flyers. “The way you defeat bad speech is with good speech,” Ms. Beirich says.

 

After the flyers appeared at Indiana, the provost released a statement saying that “our campus unequivocally rejects the cowardice and ugliness that this group’s action represents.” University police are investigating the incident.

 

Meanwhile, Professor Grim decided to use the incident as an opportunity for a class discussion about how white supremacist groups react to what they see as a scarcity of resources in the country. “Whenever groups like this perceive their opportunity being reduced,” she says, “they believe it’s happening because somebody unworthy is taking something from them.”

 

Professor Grim is disturbed by what she sees as a climate of xenophobia and hatred in America today. When she and her family experienced racism growing up, she says, “my parents always taught us that your response can never be hate.”

 

Heeding that message, she says, “was the only way I survived.”

 

Increasing Hate in Trumps America


Republicans refuse to call these kinds of people thugs..they call them Republicans Smiley Happy

 

So it begins.
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,162
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

Message 38 of 53 (220 Views)

‘Let’s Become Great Again,’ the Flyers Said

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of President Trump.

 

Growing up in Mississippi in the 1960s, Prof. Valerie Grim was only too familiar with racism. So when she discovered flyers from a white nationalist group posted outside her office at Indiana University Bloomington, she wasn’t intimidated.

 

Instead, she was curious about what had led someone to post flyers depicting Michelangelo’s David along with the phrase “Let’s become great again” and the name of Identity Evropa, a white nationalist group, outside offices in the university’s department of African-American and African diaspora studies. The group’s name, symbol and Twitter handle were also written on the whiteboard on Prof. Grim’s door.

 

“This is someone who really got a wrong view of history,” says Professor Grim, who teaches African-American history. She wishes she could invite those responsible for the flyers into her office for a conversation: “Don’t hide behind a flyer. Come in, let’s talk.”

 

Identity Evropa is one of several groups that appeared last year, seemingly in response to President Trump’s candidacy, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. The number of hate groups operating in the United States rose from 892 in 2015 to 917 in 2016, the center reported on Wednesday.

 

Identity Evropa has ties to other white nationalist groups in the United States and abroad. The founder of the group, Nathan Damigo, attended the summit of the National Policy Institute, the white nationalist group run by Richard Spencer, in Washington in November. Identity Evropa has ideological similarities to anti-Muslim “identitarian” movements in Europe, and links to identitarian literature on its website.

 

The main activity of the group is posting flyers on college campuses. The flyers have appeared on more than two dozen campuses in 2017, including the University of Chicago and the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

Other white nationalist groups have also posted flyers around the country recently. Last week, flyers reading “Make America White Again” and including the web address of The Right Stuff, a white nationalist group, were discovered in mailboxes and on driveways in Norwalk, Conn. And printers at Stanford, Vanderbilt and the University of California, Berkeley, printed anti-Semitic flyers last month, probably as the result of hacking.

 

When white supremacist flyers show up on campus, university officials should not respond by cracking down on student speech or by ignoring the incident, says Heidi Beirich, director of the intelligence project at the Southern Poverty Law Center. Instead, they should clearly and forcefully denounce the views expressed on the flyers. “The way you defeat bad speech is with good speech,” Ms. Beirich says.

 

After the flyers appeared at Indiana, the provost released a statement saying that “our campus unequivocally rejects the cowardice and ugliness that this group’s action represents.” University police are investigating the incident.

 

Meanwhile, Professor Grim decided to use the incident as an opportunity for a class discussion about how white supremacist groups react to what they see as a scarcity of resources in the country. “Whenever groups like this perceive their opportunity being reduced,” she says, “they believe it’s happening because somebody unworthy is taking something from them.”

 

Professor Grim is disturbed by what she sees as a climate of xenophobia and hatred in America today. When she and her family experienced racism growing up, she says, “my parents always taught us that your response can never be hate.”

 

Heeding that message, she says, “was the only way I survived.”

 

Increasing Hate in Trumps America


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,162
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Re: Trump's America - "This Week in Hate"

Message 39 of 53 (223 Views)

Hateful Threats Against a Jewish Blogger

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of President Trump.

 

Marc Yellin had gotten some political criticism during his six years of blogging about Jewish life in Albuquerque, but nothing like the messages he received last month.

 

The 66-year-old retired technical writer checked his email on the morning of Jan. 13, to find that someone had used the contact form on his website to submit two threatening messages containing anti-Semitic slurs.

 

“If you try to get the US involved in another war for Israel there are thousands of sleepers in the US who will shoot up your synagogues,” one of the messages said.

 

In the contact form, the sender had entered the name William Pierce, the founder of a white nationalist organization who died in 2002.

 

Mr. Yellin was somewhat afraid when he read the messages, but mostly disgusted and disappointed. He wondered, “Have we come to this?”

 

After he recovered from the initial shock, Mr. Yellin contacted the Anti-Defamation League, which reported the threat to the F.B.I. and the Albuquerque police. Authorities are investigating the incident.

 

Mr. Yellin was not the only one in Albuquerque to receive an anti-Semitic threat in January. The Jewish Community Center of Greater Albuquerque was one of dozens of Jewish community facilities around the country to receive bomb threats last month. The facility was evacuated and police confirmed there was no bomb. The F.B.I. is investigating the bomb threats.

 

Anti-Semitic threats are unusual in Albuquerque, according to Suki Halevi, the New Mexico regional director of the Anti-Defamation League. “We’ve been hearing about it and reading about it happening in other places,” she says, “and now these incidents have reached our community.”

 

The A.D.L. is concerned about an increase in reported hate crimes and online harassment since the start of the presidential campaign. In New Mexico, the group has been working with Muslim and immigrants’ rights groups to respond to and prepare for incidents of hate. The A.D.L. also offers training and online resources to help Jewish communities recognize suspicious activity and keep facilities safe.

 

“One of the goals of cyberharassment and threats of violence is to disrupt a community and cause fear,” says Ms. Halevi. “When the community is prepared, it helps to stop that from happening.”

 

For Mr. Yellin, one way to fight hate is to talk about it. A few weeks after he got the threatening messages, he wrote about them on his blog: “This blatant, open anti-Semitism must not be allowed to become the new normal.

 

more at:  Hateful Threats Against a Jewish Blogger


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,162
Registered: ‎06-09-2010

Re: From "This Week in Hate"

Message 40 of 53 (272 Views)

A High School Defaced With ‘Trump’ and Swastikas


 
People rallied in support of students at Withrow University High School after their campus was vandalized.CreditKareem Elgazzar/The Cincinnati Enquirer

 

This Week in Hate highlights hate crimes and harassment around the country since the election of Donald Trump.

 

When Alandes Powell arrived at her son’s high school on Sunday, she saw a swastika and the word “Trump” spray-painted on a building. On benches and a sign at the school’s new baseball field, she saw more graffiti, including racist and homophobic slurs.

 

A friend had alerted Ms. Powell to the vandalism at Withrow University High School in Cincinnati, where her son is a senior and football player. Her first reaction was anger. “You want education to be a safe place,” she said. “These kids are just growing into who they want to be.”

 

She wondered if the school, which serves a predominantly African-American student body in a white neighborhood, had been targeted because football players, including her son, Julian, took a knee during the national anthem before games in the fall to protest police killings of African American people.

 

Police are still investigating the vandalism, which they believe was committed late Saturday night.

 

They have released a surveillance image of a suspect.

 

Meanwhile, other schools in the area are showing their support for Withrow, with students making banners and wearing orange, one of Withrow’s colors, to school and to games. “We play in a league of mostly white schools,” said Ms. Powell, and “they have all just embraced us.”

 

She believes the election of President Trump has made people more comfortable expressing racist views. But, she explained, the vandalism at Withrow has brought a new sense of unity to Cincinnati that crosses racial lines. “We’re going to be greater than great,” she said.

 

Here are some reports of hate crimes and harassment that have drawn public attention in recent days.

 

• A man has been charged with reckless endangerment and menacingfor allegedly brandishing a gun and using racist language in an argument with a taxi driver in New Paltz, N.Y., on Sunday.

 

• Last Wednesday, as many as 27 Jewish community centers around the country received bomb threats. For some, it was the second threat in two weeks — 16 facilities had received bomb threats on January 9.

• The Belmont County Republican Party headquarters in St. Clairsville, Ohio, was vandalized on Sunday with the message “stop Trump.”

 

• On Saturday, a liquor store in Newtown, Conn., was robbed, set on fire and vandalized with swastikas and an anti-Semitic message. Local police are investigating and have notified federal authorities.

 

• A man has been charged with a hate crime for allegedly shouting a racial slur at a Catholic priest of Nigerian descent and threatening him with a baseball bat in Brooklyn on January 13.

 

• Last Wednesday, graffiti including a swastika and the word “Trump” was found at a public library in Northbrook, Ill. Local police are investigating the graffiti, and several similar incidents of vandalism at the library since the election, as possible hate crimes.

 

Anti-Semitic messages and drawings were found throughout a building on the University of Maryland, Baltimore County on January 14. Campus police are investigating the vandalism as a hate crime.

 

• On January 16, a sign reading “diversity is a code word for white genocide,” was placed outside Parkside Middle School in Manchester, N.H. The sign has been removed, and police are investigating the incident. A similar sign was found outside Webster Elementary School, also in Manchester.

 

• A mosque in Davis, Calif., was vandalized on Sunday, with windows broken, bicycles parked outside damaged and strips of bacon placed on a door handle. Police are investigating the incident as a hate crime.

 

If you have experienced, witnessed or read about a hate crime or incident of bias or harassment, you can use this form to send information about the incident to This Week in Hate and other partners in the Documenting Hate project. The form is not a report to law enforcement or any government agency. These resources may be helpful for people who have experienced harassment. If you witness harassment, here are some tips for responding. You can contact This Week in Hate at weekinhate@nytimes.com.

Correction: January 25, 2017

An earlier version of this story misspelled, in some instances, the name of the high school in Cincinnati that was vandalized on Saturday. It is Withrow University High School, not Wilford.

Continue reading the main story

"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.