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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 1 of 33

@Panjandrum—Heartbreaking!

 

Gee, I miss having a real president!

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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 2 of 33

Centristsin2010 wrote:

Panjandrum wrote:

We do indeed have some great police. It made me angry to see how this man is being treated. Not fair at all.

 

Hero cop of Pulse shooting is being terminated from force

 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/12/05/hero-cop-orlandos-pulse-shooting-terminated-force/925...


Excellent post, panjan.  I wasn't aware of this situation and I hope those who support the police, which includes myself, express their concern to the City of Eatonville Florida.


It's Florida - a state where the Florida Attorney General appears to have "highly flexible fiscally driven ethical standards" - who takes "campaign donations" from trump related organizations in return for dropping investigation/prosecution of so-called "Trump University" - a quid pro quo? - sure looks that way...

Wonder which politically powerful group in Florida "bought" a bunch of corrupt city and law enforcement administrators...

 

 

Have pity for Melania - she wakes up with a jerk every morning
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 3 of 33

North Charleston and the State of South Carolina both failed abjectly regarding Slager - but the Feds were successful...

Perhaps there is something the Feds can do about Habersham's dishonesty...

 

 

Have pity for Melania - she wakes up with a jerk every morning
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 4 of 33

alferdpacker wrote:

Indeed - the situation with the case of Habersham is a really big smelly one...

 

Agreed....but from what I've been able to find is that nothing relevant was done, no firing, no arrest....why?  I suspect it's because North Charleston needs as many law enforcement officers of color as possible, he's already trained and he's "blue" to the core.  Integrity?  Folks can decide for themselves.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 5 of 33

Panjandrum wrote:

We do indeed have some great police. It made me angry to see how this man is being treated. Not fair at all.

 

Hero cop of Pulse shooting is being terminated from force

 

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/12/05/hero-cop-orlandos-pulse-shooting-terminated-force/925...


Excellent post, panjan.  I wasn't aware of this situation and I hope those who support the police, which includes myself, express their concern to the City of Eatonville Florida.


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 6 of 33

Indeed - the situation with the case of Habersham is a really big smelly one...

 

 

Have pity for Melania - she wakes up with a jerk every morning
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 7 of 33

Not to anyone's surprise, I can be wrong.  In fact, I'm wrong at least once everyday....I try and make it a habit   Smiley Tongue

 

I thought there were two cops who filed false police reports corroborating another cop's murder of a suspect.  But, there was only one.  It was a black officer, covering-up for a white officer after he murdered a black suspect.  The races, or color don't matter here; what mattered was the cops were "blue".

 

In case you may have forgotten, this was the cell phone video of much of the event:

 

 

THE CLARENCE HABERSHAM PROBLEM

 

Skin color has never been a viable proxy when dealing with the issue of police conduct.  Even when they’re black, cops are still blue.  Yet, seeing Clarence Habersham stand over the fatally wounded Walter Scott, as North Charleston Police Officer Michael Slager casually drops the throwaway Taser by the body, demands an answer.

 

How could he stand there and do nothing?

 

Most of the time, the focus is on the baddest dude, the cop who pulled the trigger, or kicked the teeth, or swung the baton until the head erupted like a ripe melon.  And without question, any cop who breaks the law and harms a person deserves all the attention that can be rammed down his throat.

 

That said, it doesn’t happen without the complicity of those other cops standing around.  Clarence Habersham is such a cop.

 

Did he stop Michael Slager from killing Walter Scott?

 

Did he immediately provide aid to try and save Scott’s life?

 

Did he act when he saw Slager drop the throwaway Taser?

 

Did he tell the truth when time came to address what happened in front of him?

 

No, Clarence Habersham did none of those things.  He was blue, and that meant he would not breach the blue wall of silence, the loyalty of one cop to another to keep his secrets, even at the expense of a human being’s life.  No, Clarence Habersham did nothing to save a life or preserve the truth.

 

For that, he must be held accountable.

 

So often, we decry the police officer who engages in brutality, in unwarranted violence, with little expectation that it will produce more than a promise of an investigation, with a conclusion that would defy reason. By then, we’re usually past it, on to the next beating, the next death. The outcome rarely hits our radar.

 

Then there are times, as here, where an arrest is made, a murderer accused. Michael Slager sits in a cell for the killing of Walter Scott.  This frees us to focus on the cop who stood there, who watched, who did nothing to stop or save Walter Scott from death.

 

Habersham isn’t a virgin to excessive force complaints. He’s being sued, along with four other cops, by Sheldon Williams for breaking his face.  Whether it’s true or not will be the subject of trial, and not speculation here. But the suit might at minimum have sensitized Habersham to a responsibility to at least lift a finger, to provide some small amount of care to the man gunned down by Slager.

 

Indeed, his chief, before revelation of the video, believed that Habersham rendered aid to Scott, as he stated at the post-killing press conference.  Sadly, this turned out to be wrong.

 

No, Clarence Habersham wasn’t the shooter.  No, it was not his decision to take the life of Walter Scott.  But he also failed to prevent the crime, to render aid to the victim, to do anything to help a fellow human being. And then he failed to tell the truth about what happened before his eyes.

 

He should not be a cop. He cannot be trusted to be a cop, any more than any of the many other officers who have skulked silently into the darkness as we spent our time and energy trying to root out the cop with the gun or the bloody boot.

 

It’s foolish to expect that the blue wall will go away easily or any time soon.  But perhaps sending a message will help a little.  This is far too ingrained in police culture for one instance, or a hundred instances, to make a dent.

 

It remains critical that this complicity not be ignored or covered up.  Clarence Habersham must go. 

 

Clarence Habersham must be prosecuted for his role in this tragedy.  Just because he didn’t pull the trigger does not absolve him from his complicity in this horrific crime.

 

THE CLARENCE HABERSHAM PROBLEM


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 8 of 33

mandm84 wrote:

I realize one bad cop is too many , but when you are dealing with human beings working under repeated extreme stress , dealing with the most dangerous situations known to mankind , things can go wrong in a flash. We are talking about 1 Million Law Enforcement Officers out there protecting our normal way of life and handling a billion calls for service.

 

I dont think perfection is ever possible when dealing with human behavior on such a large scale. It's one of the toughest jobs and until you wear those shoes , you will never know. When one Officer commits a crime , he or she should be held accountable IMHO , but perfection - never !


I agree with your sentiment.  BUT.....

 

Do we really need to excuse bad cops behavior?  Mental institution employees are under great stress, firemen are under great stress; nurses are under great stress; air traffic controllers are under great stress, as are others.  The difference is they don't carry guns or batons to kill and/or beat those they are paid to protect.

 

According to a recent survey, the most stressful jobs are:

 

1.  Enlisted Military Personnel

2.  Firefighter

3.  Airline Pilot

4.  Police

5.  Event Coordinator

6.  P.R. Executive

7,  Senior Corporate Executive

8   Broadcaster

9.  Reporter

10  Taxi Driver 

 

https://www.cbsnews.com/media/the-10-most-stressful-jobs/

 

Yet we don't defend or excuse any of these for wrong doing when "mistakes" or "accidents" occur.

 

I'm not sure if anyone has attacked on this forum, a law enforcement officer who made a mistake.  No one has advocated perfection as I believe you imply.  Do you excuse the LAPD?  The Inkster, MI police, the Ferguson Police, Cleveland? Baltimore?  Chicago?  There IS a problem.  How big?  Your guess is as good as mine.  BUT, there will be no changes, no improvements unless Americans demand better and more accountability. Do you REALLY think the beating of Rodney King by several police officer's was due to stress?  Or the Inkster police beating?  Text messages between several officers revealed they looked for blacks to pull over and beat.  One texted another cop, "Did you get a <n-word> tonight?"  and, "At least give me the satisfaction of knowing you were out there beating up n*****s right now," which one replied, "LOL," "Just got done with one."

 

Good Americans need to fight this type of behavior if they have any decency, or integrity at all and remember, many see all cops as "good" cops until something like the above comes to light.  It's not much different than a mass killer was a law-abiding citizen, a "nice" neighbor, a quiet guy, until they get a hotel room and kill 57 innocent people.

 

REAL, "good" cops know who the bad cops are in departments with "bad cops"; it's time the good cops focus on being hero's to their entire communities by weeding out the bad cops and not just pulling someone from a burning car....There are many way's to "save lies" and protect their communities.  It IS, their job DUTY!


"FAKE 45 #illegitimate" read a sign at the Woman's March in Washington DC, January 21, 2017.
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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 9 of 33

We do indeed have some great police. It made me angry to see how this man is being treated. Not fair at all.

 

Hero cop of Pulse shooting is being terminated from force

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/12/05/hero-cop-orlandos-pulse-shooting-terminated-force/925...

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Re: The Good that Police Do.

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Message 10 of 33

I realize one bad cop is too many , but when you are dealing with human beings working under repeated extreme stress , dealing with the most dangerous situations known to mankind , things can go wrong in a flash. We are talking about 1 Million Law Enforcement Officers out there protecting our normal way of life and handling a billion calls for service.

 

I dont think perfection is ever possible when dealing with human behavior on such a large scale. It's one of the toughest jobs and until you wear those shoes , you will never know. When one Officer commits a crime , he or she should be held accountable IMHO , but perfection - never !

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