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Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 63
Registered: ‎10-16-2012

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 21 of 29 (679 Views)
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Suzoo, I've worked in healthcare facilities too and some are more like hotels than nursing or health facilities. They are great places for people who are sociable and like being with others. My grandmother didn't like to converse with others and enjoyed only her family (which was unfortunate). That's why it was so sad to have to put her in such a place.

My mother is approaching 90 and lives by herself.  She has lots of help (mainly from me) as she does not drive and never has.  I deal with her meds, doctor visits, paying bills, and just generally seeing that she has what she needs.  The biggest problem is that she has never been a social person.  It's a major task to get her to leave the house.  She doesn't even want to attend family functions such as birthdays or holiday get-togethers.  Lots of times I just tell her I will pick her up.  She will go, but she really protests.  Don't know if she just wants someone to "beg" or if she really doesn't want to go.  Her biggest excuse is that the dog will be home by herself.  I think if she liked being around people she would do well in a group setting, but I think if I ever had to place her in a facility, she would decline very quickly.  She seems to be happy where she is, so that's what I hope we can continue to do.  She has always been an active person - always had "jobs' to do around the house, so maybe her keeping active has contributed to her longevity.  She has also been very conscious of her diet until the last few years.  Preparing food  for herself has not been something she enjoys since my father passed away.  She gets two meals-on-wheels a day and I'm very thankful the program is available.  At least I know she's receiving healthy food.


Carol

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 1,945
Registered: ‎06-26-2010

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 22 of 29 (642 Views)
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Speaking from the viewpoint of someone who has been a nursing home administrator and still is working in the aging network - moving to a nursing home is not always a negative for everyone - some people thrive there because they love having friends and someone to talk to and they may have been isolated and alone in their home.


Also, the nature of many of the nursing homes nationwide is beginning to change - we have a nursing home here in Kansas that has a real accredited kindergarten within the home - the residents get to participate as they wish in the fun that can only happen during our first year in school - this has been very successful and a very positive thing for the residents of the nursing home as well as for the kindergarteners (some who do not know their biological grandparents).


Also, you might consider a new concept for your Mom, which in Kansas, we call Home Plus - online you might google for the Greenhouse Projects - also, a very positive and successful alternative to traditional nursing homes.


Now to give my opinion on your real question- "What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?" - I believe it has a lot to do with the individual's attitude - trying to have fun and enjoy anything that happens in my day keeps me active, thinking young, feeling young and usually sends me into lots of little fits of laughter daily - some people think I have a weird sense of humor, I think I see humor in a lot of places most people never even look for humor.


Thanks for the question - Suzoo

Suzoo, I've worked in healthcare facilities too and some are more like hotels than nursing or health facilities. They are great places for people who are sociable and like being with others. My grandmother didn't like to converse with others and enjoyed only her family (which was unfortunate). That's why it was so sad to have to put her in such a place.

Conversationalist
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎01-25-2009

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 23 of 29 (632 Views)
In Response to What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?:

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

Speaking from the viewpoint of someone who has been a nursing home administrator and still is working in the aging network - moving to a nursing home is not always a negative for everyone - some people thrive there because they love having friends and someone to talk to and they may have been isolated and alone in their home.


Also, the nature of many of the nursing homes nationwide is beginning to change - we have a nursing home here in Kansas that has a real accredited kindergarten within the home - the residents get to participate as they wish in the fun that can only happen during our first year in school - this has been very successful and a very positive thing for the residents of the nursing home as well as for the kindergarteners (some who do not know their biological grandparents).


Also, you might consider a new concept for your Mom, which in Kansas, we call Home Plus - online you might google for the Greenhouse Projects - also, a very positive and successful alternative to traditional nursing homes.


Now to give my opinion on your real question- "What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?" - I believe it has a lot to do with the individual's attitude - trying to have fun and enjoy anything that happens in my day keeps me active, thinking young, feeling young and usually sends me into lots of little fits of laughter daily - some people think I have a weird sense of humor, I think I see humor in a lot of places most people never even look for humor.


Thanks for the question - Suzoo

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 9,529
Registered: ‎03-29-2008

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 24 of 29 (625 Views)
In Response to What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?:

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

Wonderful photo Carolyn, we need to take more photos as the loved ones get older, we did that with my mom and have many of her in those older years.  She lived to be 100, her mother lived to be about 93 as I recall, so I think it is largely genetic.


 


It can't hurt to eat right and exercise, keep the excess weight off, that can only help the good genes along!

Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 1,009
Registered: ‎12-15-2008

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 25 of 29 (616 Views)
In Response to What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?:

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

My in-laws lived into their 90's.  I think the longevity issue  is  eat healthy, keep busy.  They always had some project to be completed like siding the house, planting the garden, etc.  Also, they never thought of themselves as old.  My mother-in-law would look at elders younger than herself as old because they acted old.


My father-in-law did great until he began dimentia.  It eventually became necessary to put him in a nursing home.  Neither one survived this they died one week apart.


Some nursing homes are wonderful.  They try to keep the residents active and happy.  It is important that you really check into the home you plan on putting your parents in.  Stop by and visit at unscheduled times.  I worked in a home that treated their residents with lots of love.  The hardest thing I ever encountered, were residents who never saw their families.  I ended up adopting many of them.  Christmas, etc, I would bring my children in and spend some time with them.  I know they appreciated it. 


How often I would see a resident sitting by the front door wishing her loved ones would come through the door and take them out for the day.  It was heart breaking.  So, please, if you have a family member in a home, take the time to stop by, even if its only a few minutes, to say hello and I love you.

Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 66
Registered: ‎04-05-2009

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 26 of 29 (613 Views)
In Response to What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?:

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

 


Morning All: I wouldn't know for my mother's parents died in their 70's of a car accident 2 years after my mother died of breast cancer when she was 2 weeks short of her 42nd b.day in the 70's anyway.. But, I have out lived my mother of 8 years now..Being 50 y.o.


 


So, What I'm doing is to eat right I do what I can on excerises and drink plenty of water. Some say 8 glasses a day but I do the method, if you're urine is clear you're fine. Anyway. Be happy, laugh alot, go to church...associate with other Christians and keep your life up to date with the Lord Jesus for he's the answer for everything. 


I may have pains but that's the thorn in my side in my life. "PTL and Pass the Ammo" and also do your best to stay away from getting sick. I am healthy other than the aches in my joins and muscles.


The longer we stay away from the hospital, nursing home, the better. Try to have people come to your home to care for you or your parents.


Blessings to all,


Terri T., WA .

Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 788
Registered: ‎03-26-2008

re: What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 27 of 29 (613 Views)
In Response to What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?:

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

My grandfather lived with me until he was 93.


The last year of his live was in a nursing home. I now regret that, but he needed physical care that I was not able to do.


I think having them at home around family is a blessing. Keeping them connected and participating with their loved ones is what they need.


When we went camping, to the amusement park, to outings at relatives and all other events we took


PaPa with us. The grand and great and great-grandchildren loved him. He was so good to children.


If at all possible get them to talk to you about everyting. They remember things about YOU that even you can't remember.


Bless them all.

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 1,945
Registered: ‎06-26-2010

What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 28 of 29 (611 Views)

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 1,945
Registered: ‎06-26-2010

What Might Contribute to a Person's Longevity?

Message 28 of 29 (611 Views)

...This is a picture of my grandmother (Mom) with my sister, my son and me. She was 96 or 97 when she died. We all thought she might have lived longer if she hadn't had to go into a nursing home. I guess it was just too difficult for my mom and dad, aunt and uncle to take care of her. So much for 20/20 hindsight.


Now with my mom soon to be 90 years old, I'm praying she doesn't have to go in a nursing home (or healthcare facility) toward the end of her life.


What do you think contributes to a person's longevity?