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Valued Social Butterfly

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 1 of 11

   Thanks to the author for the heads up.    I did a quick search of Medicare F and there is lots of information about the plan, which is a Medigap for Medicare Part B.   I can only suggest that people do their own search and calculate the additional cost of that premium and determine for themselves if the additional cost was actually worth it.    ( " Medicare Part F" were the search words)

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Conversationalist

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 2 of 11

You seem to be missing my point.  My point is not so much that rates will rise but that I will not have an option to change my medigap policy as, without guaranteed issue, I will not be accepted in another plan.  All I'm looking for is the option to change plans at least one time when Plan F premiums rise.  I don't think that is an unreasonable option. Rates are set by region and are based on many factors, including the number of policyholders paying into a particular plan. A state such as Florida with a huge population of seniors would see less effect as the premium base for a plan decreases; however, states with far fewer participants in a particular plan are going to see premiums rise more rapidly as the premiums collected for that plan decrease over time. A plan that is actively adding participants to replace those dropping out of the premium pool will see premiums stay static or rise less rapidly that a plan that is no longer adding premium payers.  This is just insurance. Medicare, as a federally mandated plan, probably has more say over rates.  I am talking about medigap premiums here; I'm talking about the premiums you pay for your supplemental insurance, which is separate from what you pay to Medicare for Part A & B.  With Plan F no longer adding participants, as people die or cancel because they can't afford the Plan F premiums, those remaining on Plan F will see steeper increases. Adding to the dilemma is the fact that as the remaining participants grow older the claims paid for those in the plan will grow and there won't be younger, less costly participants coming into the plan to reduce the cost.  So, in upcoming years, when a provider goes to the state with a case to raise the premium for Plan F participants, they are going to have the numbers to prove their case. I merely want to provide an option when seniors are squeezed by premium increases and have too many health problems at that point to change plans. Perhaps your state offers medigap changes with guaranteed issue during open enrollment; Kansas, as well as other states I suspect, does not.

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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 3 of 11

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I have never sold insurance nor have ever worked for an insurance company. I couldn’t tell you the difference between one insurance company and another one and it makes no difference to me who you purchase insurance from. If you’re happy I’m happy.

 

I don’t know from state to state whether or not you can or when to switch supplemental plans without being underwritten. All states are different I think California and maybe Washington you can change plans every year on your birthday? There are people on here that made me aware of that I didn’t know before.

 

My concern has always been your tittle of this thread: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to rise. You do not have any proof that is factual. You cannot provide me with a link to say it is true. So good luck to you and nice talking with you.

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Conversationalist

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 4 of 11

I never said they told me to drop my plan F.  I inquired about what remedy was available to me and they told me there was no guaranteed issue option if I wanted to change plans at this point.  Also, Kansas is not that populated and many of the seniors I know are on Medicare Advantage. No one has been able to tell me what the Plan F pool is in our region. Most providers offering plans do so by region, not nationwide. (I have owned an insurance agency so I am not uninformed about how insurance rates are established.) However, if our provider drops Plan F, we would then be able to change medigap plans with a guaranteed issue proviso.  I would like to know what other states do about guaranteed issue but no one I have contacted seems to know, as I have pointed out. I am not encouraging anyone to drop their Plan F; I would like to see those with Plan F have the option of rolling to Plan G with guaranteed issue. Also, not all variations of medigap plans are offered in all states, as the Medicare handbook points out. You might have options available that are not available in Kansas. I would like to see AARP use its influence to offer some clarification on this issue with a breakdown as to region and/or state and what recourse seniors have if  they wish or need to pursue other options.  Again, I wish to establish options for Plan F policyholders before the end of 2019; what plan is best for individual policyholders depends on their own needs and situation.  I do know that many seniors I have met in my state are totally unaware of which type of plan they have (i.e. Original Medicare with/without supplement or Medicare Advantage); this consists almost exclusively of Medicare Advantage participants and most of those didn't know they had an option other than Medicare Advantage.  I worked in a position that brought me into constant contact with residents who only pursued gathering information once a provider or premium issue developed. At that point, I was often having to help relatives find reliable sources of information so that they could take care of their parent or grandparent.  I am really confused at your unwillingness to explore options. Not everyone may have your resources.  AARP could be a powerful advocate for getting the legislatures, be they state or federal, to give Plan F seniors an option.  If we wait until later, there may be no remedy left on the table.

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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 5 of 11

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A solution to what? A phone conversation between you and an insurance salesman speculating about what if? And I question if a state agency department of insurance or SHIIP would give you a direct comment to drop your plan F because the premiums are going up.

 

I think you mean well but there is no proof that plan F premiums will rise any faster than plan A, B, C, D, G, K, L, M or N. It’s only speculation and that’s what I believe the Kansas SHIIP told you.

 

I’ve asked several professionals myself and they all say the same thing plan H, I, and J were let go by CMS and their premiums did not rise because of lack of new enrollees. There premiums went up because they had home healthcare and prescription drug benefits attached to them and other benefits. They say there is no proof otherwise.

 

More people should do like you and take the time to call the different agencies to learn more about Medicare. I think that’s great that you do. It’s just that too many people visit these blogs and post stuff that’s just not been proven and it confuses people.

 

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Conversationalist

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 6 of 11

You can call the same Kansas departments that I did if you want confirmation or consult any insurance broker who will explain to you how insurance pools work when they set premiums. You obviously have no interest in pursuing a remedy; rather you would rather jump on me for attempting to alert Plan F policyholders that there is a problem coming down the line.  I would rather find a remedy before the end of 2019 rather than after.  As I noted, there is a simple if albeit imperfect fix.  I would like to see you encourage a solution raather than try to bury the problem.

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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 7 of 11

'

So you can’t provide proof to what you posted about premiums will rise much faster than for other plans. No links ... nothing.

You do more harm with your fearmongering speculations than good when you can’t prove one iota of truth to your claims.

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Conversationalist

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 8 of 11

I would further suggest that other community participants who are currently on Plan F call their own states' insurance departments to find out how the guaranteed issue option operates in his/her own particular state.  It would be helpful if they would then report here how their own state handles the medigap guaranteed option issue. Kansas does not allow guaranteed issue on medigap policies the first 6 months of enrollment; I was originally told by SHICK that we had 12 months after enrollment to change medigap providers and still have guaranteed issue. During my recent conversations with the Kansas agencies I was informed this period is 6 months, not 12; but I didn't pursue whether or not that is a recent change.  They could only tell me they follow the "recommendations" provided by Medicare but, when I asked if those recommendations were mandatory, they said I would have to open an inquiry as they couldn't answer that question without researching it.

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Conversationalist

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 9 of 11

I cannot provide a link as my information comes from phone conversations with the Kansas Departmentth for Aging and Disability Services (KDADS) and the consumer division of the Kansas Insurance Dept. Those agencies told me my only remedy currently available in Kansas is to ask my Plan F provider to consider allowing me to roll to Plan G without any medical underwriting; however, that would be strictly up to the provider as that option for guaranteed issue ends for medigap enrollmet after your first 12 months. The Kansas Dept. of Insurance confirmed that premium increases are influenced by the number of enrollees in a particular plan and that premiums for Plan F partipants would almost certainly rise faster than other plans whose poicyholder pools are being refreshed with new enrollees on a continuing basis. I have mixed information as to how the guaranteed issue operates in other state and, in fact, the Kansas Insurance Dept. was unable to confirm whether guaranteed issue options are controlled at the state or at the Federal level, which is why they said I would have to open an inquiry so that they could research this. From personal experience, I can say that my and spouse's premiums have increased twice this year with another increase almost certainly coming on our policy anniversary date.  I am on the agenda to address the Silver-Haired Legislature in January.  I did not get my information from a blog. I found out about the change from the independent agent who advised us when we first went on Medicare. I then confirmed the information with phone calls to the state agencies noted above.

 

There is a simple legislative fix if someone can tell me which level, state or federal, would have to make the fix; that would be to allow Plan F participants at least a one-time option to change medigap plans with a guaranteed issue. Any participant with significant health problems is not going to be accepted by another Plan F issuer without a guaranteed issue proviso.  I have seen the form I would have to complete if I wanted to change plans at this point; it is a pretty standard medical underwriting form for individual health policy applicants no matter the age. 

 

 

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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Plan F will no longer be offered after 2019; premiums likely to riseDeptDoes an

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Message 10 of 11

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This is old news. We’ve known about plan F for the last 2 years. Plan F is going to that place in the sky where Plan H, I and J went years earlier.

 

Can you provide everyone on here with a link that proves your statement: “However, because there will be no new enrollees in the plan, Premiums will rise much faster than for other plans.”

 

And not a link from some Friday night blogger. I’m talking about a link from a credible source, an insurance company or source, Medicare, ect. I don’t think you can. 

 

I’ve seen other people come on here and post disingenuous information about Medicare and insurance that they’ve heard at the barber shop or from Cousin Daryl and unable to back it up with proof.

 

You realize that’s not fair to everyone that visits these sites when someone comes on here with misleading information in bold print like you did. I hope you can back it up.

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