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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 1 of 10

Thanks for the clear explanation. You should write for the aarp publications.

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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 2 of 10

I certainly do not mind paying reasonable cost increases, but my medicare premiums have risen nearly FORTY PERCENT since 2013. Thank you republicans in congress and the white house. Can hardly wait for November 2018.

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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 3 of 10
Totally agree!
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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 4 of 10

I totally agree with you! The information provided in the December 2017  Bulletin article entitled Medicare 2018 was entirely wrong!

 I even called AARP to inform them of this & the lady I spoke to initially informed me that they were aware and a correction would appear in the January 2018 bulletin. After I told her that I read ALL bulletins entirely & would look forward to the retraction, she hastely informed me that the correction could be found in the AARP.org web page. Guess what! I just scanned the site and NOWHERE was the retraction of the December Medicare 2018 article!

 

The article stated that the 2017 $109.00 Medicare premium would be the same in 2018. It INCREASED to $134.00. Effetively wiping out the increase in Social Security (except for a modest $6.00 increase in my case) my net gain came out to .3%.  That's 1/3 of 1 % Whoop De Doo!

 

I realize that AARP is in  a hurry to get their magazines out every month.......but you would think that they would double check their articles for correctness, especially since seniors like us depend on them and believe in them for information. Countless times I have informed my physician of articles I have read in the AARP bulletin and ran the opinion by him and now I'm finding I can't believe ebverything I read  in AARP magazines.

By the way, Johnson5000 has a very intelligent way of communicating our frustration with AARP articles. Kudos to him/her for speaking out!

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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 5 of 10

I don't think I should have to read an article three times in the AARP Bulletin to try and figure out what it means.  I'm referring to the poorly written "Medicare 2018" column in the December Bulletin.  Before sitting down to read the Bulletin this evening, I too had been quite dismayed to see that every dollar of my anticipated 2018 Social Security COLA would be sucked away into an increase in my Medicare benefit.  The same thing happened to the paltry increase in my 2015 Social Security benefit.  The overall result is that for four years my Social Security benefit has never gone up, either through the absence of a COLA or the COLA going completely to an increase in -Medicare.  Meanwhile, my gas utility company recently sent out notices saying that they would be increasing prices this season; my city raised garbage pick up rates by several dollars a month; gasoline has never returned to its pre-Texas-hurricane prices in my area, and most items I routinely buy in the grocery store (except possibly for eggs and chicken!) have edged up in price this year.  I had an understanding of why my COLA had suffered this fate, BUT after reading the AARP article, I found the information conveyed so muddling that I actually began to wonder for a moment if my Social Security statement was in error. I then went online and found other people with the very same issue about this article. In general, I think AARP needs to realize that columns written on such topics as Medicare, Social Security, and perhaps other topics as well, should not be farmed out to clumsy writers, because to the reader audience this information is vital.  If information is muddled or even wrongly communicated it can be upsetting, raise false and misconstrued alarms, and generally be counter-productive to well being.  It is bad enough that often the Bulletin is little more than a vehicle for advertising, but when it can't be trusted to convey non-muddled information, it sinks to a new level of worthlessness. 

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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 6 of 10
I'm new to this, but I find it interesting that while the current inflation rate is 2.2%, Social Security notified me of a 2% cost of living increase in my benefits, which is the same as last year. What I find interesting is that the Medicare deduction is $131.00, which leaves my monthly Social Security benefit exactly the same as last year. This is the same as last year. It seems that no matter how much "cost of living" increase is "given," Medicare "takes" exactly that amount leaving me with an actual decrease in my overall standard of living, making it even more difficult pay the increasing costs for utilities, food, medicine, etc. After all the years of working and contributing to this country, it seems the goal of the government is to not value retired folks. It is very discouraging to say the least.
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Re: Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 7 of 10
mine went to $134 also ...took my cost of living raise .....so only $1.00 out of pocket ........
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Recognized Social Butterfly

Re: Medicare 2018 cost

4,661 Views
Message 8 of 10

.

As to the AARP bulletin article I admit that paragraph sounds ambiguous but if you reread the tittle of the article in might make more sense.
“Medicare 2018” “Announced changes will lower premiums for some”

 

Remember they can’t raise your Medicare Part B premium if it ends up reducing your social security benefits from one year to the next. Hold harmless rule.

 

70% of us will get a 2% cost of living increase on our SS that is greater than the $25 increase in the Medicare premium from $109 to $134. So 70% of us will pay $134.

 

The other 30% will still receive a 2% cost of living on their SS, but it amounts to less than $25. Therefore they will continue to pay $109 or less than $134 because having to pay $134 would reduce their net monthly SS check below what they were paid last year because their cost of living raise is less than $25.

 

Remembering no increase in Medicare premium can cause your SS benefits to decline from one year to the next.

 

At least that’s the way I took the article to read but its still confusing the way it's written.

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: Medicare 2018 cost

4,686 Views
Message 9 of 10

I found I think the same article, as well as another from AARP, that don't match up with what you're quoting...

 

  1. If you are collecting Social Security, which automatically pays your Part B premium, you’re paying about $109 a month in 2017 because of a law that prevents Medicare premiums from lowering Social Security payments. That amount could change for 2018 depending on how the 2 percent Social Security cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) affects your individual monthly payment.
  2. The Medicare Part B standard monthly premium will remain at $134 for 2018, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). But most beneficiaries — those whose premiums are automatically deducted from their Social Security payments — will pay more than they did in 2017 for the physician portion of Medicare next year.

Medicare Part B premiums are increasing for both those beneficaries protected by the hold harmlesss act due, to the COLA increase, as well as those who pay their premiums based off IRMAA.

Melissa Kay
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Medicare 2018 cost

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Message 10 of 10

The Dec 2017 issue of AARP Bulletin has an article titled "Medicare 2018". Under "Part B Premiums" are the statement: "If you are on Medicare and collecting Social Security (which pays your Part B Premiums), you'll likely pay $109 a month for 2018...". I fit this category. In my case the cost of Medicare is going up to $134.

 

Please double check your sources about the $109 cost. Maybe this cost is only in certain states or cities. If so, the article should have stated this.

 

Otherwise, please print another article with more definitive information. I've been led to believe that everyone with Medicare will now have to pay $134.

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