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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 1 of 7

I don’t know if anyone could say for sure what would happen. You might try calling your states department of insurance perhaps they might be able to give you something concrete.

 

Personally if it was me I would bite the bullet and not give up my cobra at $700 a month until the boys and girls in DC figure out how to fix this healthcare fiasco. And at the rate they’ve been going if you’re 62 now you’ll probably be 71 by the time our elected officials get it figured out.

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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 2 of 7

john258 wrote:



After all that you forgot as I pointed out.


Please read chronological comment 4 more carefully.

 

Please stop misquoting me.

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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 3 of 7

byrondennis wrote:

john258 wrote:



What you forgot to tell the poster was that the Senate passed bill removes the penalty for not having insurance so that means all do not have to be in the rating pool.

 

With out all in the rating pool you have to have the pre Ex back in medical policies. They say 13 million will loose insurance, and rates will go up an average of at least 10%. People with preX will not be able to get insurance so will use ER care further leading to rate increases, and tax increases to cover that. In the end increased rates will be what will happen over the coming years until all are required again to have insurance, and forced to get it.

 

Let the AARP people answer the tough questions so there is a totally correct answer.


Chrono comment 3 is completely consistent with everything posted by the person that posted chrono comment 3. He or she clearly has some kind of reading comprehension issue and all his or her comments are oddball stream-of-consciousness run-on-sentences that are almost impossible to decipher (so I added paragraph breaks).

 

1. I didn't "forget to tell the poster" anything. Chrono comment 1 had nothing to do with rating pools. So why would I mention rating pools?

 

2. The middle section of chrono comment 3 is apparently chrono commenter 3's opinion about something else that is also non responsive to chrono comment 1. Chrono commenter 3 seems to believe -- citing no reason -- that

  • eliminating the heavy tax on lower middle class people who are not even in the rating pool today and do not want to be in the rating pool tomorrow
  • will somehow  change the Federal law vis a vis pre-existing conditions for and raise premiums for people who are in the rating pool today and want to stay in the rating pool tomorrow.

That's totally illogical. They are not in the pool today so they are not rated today so they have no affect on premiums. And none of this has anything to do with existing law concerning pre-existing conditions. Similarly all the followup gibberish about ERs and people being "again" forced to get insurance is nonsense. The ERs are already full. And no one is forced to get insurance today so how can they be "again forced to get it."

 

3. AARP does not sell PPACA-based insurance to the best of my knowledge (according to comments others have posted here) so what makes chrono commenter 3 think AARP would answer this question about PPACA-based insurance when it does not even seem to answer questions about the expensive private insurance it does sell that are posted in this Topic.


After all that you forgot as I pointed out.

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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 4 of 7

john258 wrote:



What you forgot to tell the poster was that the Senate passed bill removes the penalty for not having insurance so that means all do not have to be in the rating pool.

 

With out all in the rating pool you have to have the pre Ex back in medical policies. They say 13 million will loose insurance, and rates will go up an average of at least 10%. People with preX will not be able to get insurance so will use ER care further leading to rate increases, and tax increases to cover that. In the end increased rates will be what will happen over the coming years until all are required again to have insurance, and forced to get it.

 

Let the AARP people answer the tough questions so there is a totally correct answer.


Chrono comment 3 is completely consistent with everything posted by the person that posted chrono comment 3. He or she clearly has some kind of reading comprehension issue and all his or her comments are oddball stream-of-consciousness run-on-sentences that are almost impossible to decipher (so I added paragraph breaks).

 

1. I didn't "forget to tell the poster" anything. Chrono comment 1 had nothing to do with rating pools. So why would I mention rating pools?

 

2. The middle section of chrono comment 3 is apparently chrono commenter 3's opinion about something else that is also non responsive to chrono comment 1. Chrono commenter 3 seems to believe -- citing no reason -- that

  • eliminating the heavy tax on lower middle class people who are not even in the rating pool today and do not want to be in the rating pool tomorrow
  • will somehow  change the Federal law vis a vis pre-existing conditions for and raise premiums for people who are in the rating pool today and want to stay in the rating pool tomorrow.

That's totally illogical. They are not in the pool today so they are not rated today so they have no affect on premiums. And none of this has anything to do with existing law concerning pre-existing conditions. Similarly all the followup gibberish about ERs and people being "again" forced to get insurance is nonsense. The ERs are already full. And no one is forced to get insurance today so how can they be "again forced to get it."

 

3. AARP does not sell PPACA-based insurance to the best of my knowledge (according to comments others have posted here) so what makes chrono commenter 3 think AARP would answer this question about PPACA-based insurance when it does not even seem to answer questions about the expensive private insurance it does sell that are posted in this Topic.

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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 5 of 7

byrondennis wrote:

kdgay001 wrote:

I retired at age 62 and currently have COBRA coverage through my prior employer since I am not yet eligible for Medicare.  The COBRA coverage is very expensive, around $700/month.  If I switch to ACA, will I be in danger of not having any coverage if the current administration chooses to repeal or replace Obamacare?  


1. No, Congress cannot "cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?"  But you say you actually do not have any such insurance so it's hard to answer the question with a single yes/no. So

2. Yes, Congress can repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 as amended, on which "ACA" insurance, should you choose to buy some, is based. However, Congress has tried and failed to repeal PPACA about 60 times since 2011 so it is unlikely to be repealed

3. What is more likely to happen in the very near future is

  • A. Congress will for the first time appropriate some money to lower the cost of some ACA insurance for lower middle class people because the cost of ACA insurance, even for people getting subsidies, has gone through the roof
  • B. Congress will remove the tax on people who choose not to buy ACA insurance

4. Neither the current administration or any future administration can do anything to PPACA in the future future unless Congress passes an additional law or additional laws changing it.


What you forgot to tell the poster was that the Senate passed bill removes the penalty for not having insurance so that means all do not have to be in the rating pool. With out all in the rating pool you have to have the pre Ex back in medical policies. They say 13 million will loose insurance, and rates will go up an average of at least 10%. People with preX will not be able to get insurance so will use ER care further leading to rate increases, and tax increases to cover that. In the end increased rates will be what will happen over the coming years until all are required again to have insurance, and forced to get it. Let the AARP people answer the tough questions so there is a totally correct answer.

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Re: Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 6 of 7

kdgay001 wrote:

I retired at age 62 and currently have COBRA coverage through my prior employer since I am not yet eligible for Medicare.  The COBRA coverage is very expensive, around $700/month.  If I switch to ACA, will I be in danger of not having any coverage if the current administration chooses to repeal or replace Obamacare?  


1. No, Congress cannot "cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?"  But you say you actually do not have any such insurance so it's hard to answer the question with a single yes/no. So

2. Yes, Congress can repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 as amended, on which "ACA" insurance, should you choose to buy some, is based. However, Congress has tried and failed to repeal PPACA about 60 times since 2011 so it is unlikely to be repealed

3. What is more likely to happen in the very near future is

  • A. Congress will for the first time appropriate some money to lower the cost of some ACA insurance for lower middle class people because the cost of ACA insurance, even for people getting subsidies, has gone through the roof
  • B. Congress will remove the tax on people who choose not to buy ACA insurance

4. Neither the current administration or any future administration can do anything to PPACA in the future future unless Congress passes an additional law or additional laws changing it.

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Can Congress cancel my ACA (Affordable Healthcare) medical insurance?

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Message 7 of 7

I retired at age 62 and currently have COBRA coverage through my prior employer since I am not yet eligible for Medicare.  The COBRA coverage is very expensive, around $700/month.  If I switch to ACA, will I be in danger of not having any coverage if the current administration chooses to repeal or replace Obamacare?  

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