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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 41 of 44 (548 Views)

JoyaDe wrote:

I used to love watching all of them land on the water when I used to live on a lake. Ice out dates were never before April 15th during those years.  This year, is so different. It warmed up and we didn't really get enough snow, so the ground is very dry right now.

 

Earlier this week, I had wood ducks in my trees outside of my office window. I get such a kick out of seeing ducks flying around in the trees. They didn't stay here for more than 10 minutes, so I didn't get any photo's. I raised a couple of wood duck babies many years ago. Fed them on bugs from under the zapper, fresh leaches, worms, and took them to the lake in the summer to feed on the algae. They flew off when grown, and I was happy glad to have had that experience. People had told me that one couldn't keep baby wood ducks alive....ha ha, I did.


@JoyaDe I wanted to ask ... how long did you have the wood duck ducklings? And how did you keep them? Do you have pictures of the wee darlings? Smiley Happy

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 42 of 44 (578 Views)

@JoyaDe Good on you for raising baby wood ducks!

 

Wood ducks nest in tree cavities, I presume you are well aware, as you've seen them in trees. I have yet to spot a wood duck in a tree, so I'm envious. Smiley Happy

 

It's been odd here along the Colorado Front Range this year as well. Migration is well underway already and has been for over a month.

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 172
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 43 of 44 (572 Views)

I used to love watching all of them land on the water when I used to live on a lake. Ice out dates were never before April 15th during those years.  This year, is so different. It warmed up and we didn't really get enough snow, so the ground is very dry right now.

 

Earlier this week, I had wood ducks in my trees outside of my office window. I get such a kick out of seeing ducks flying around in the trees. They didn't stay here for more than 10 minutes, so I didn't get any photo's. I raised a couple of wood duck babies many years ago. Fed them on bugs from under the zapper, fresh leaches, worms, and took them to the lake in the summer to feed on the algae. They flew off when grown, and I was happy glad to have had that experience. People had told me that one couldn't keep baby wood ducks alive....ha ha, I did.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

[ Edited ]
Message 44 of 44 (658 Views)

I'd enjoy being treated to reports of what other birders across the country are seeing this spring and hope bird lovers will post pictures and reports. Smiley Happy

 

To that end...

 

Saturday afternoon (April Fool's Day) we drove to/around about a dozen local farm ponds, hoping to spot new-to-us species of migrating waterfowl, however saw nothing but the usual species, those being the same ones we've seen locally since early February. Not to worry: they are beautiful birds and have fun to watch breeding rituals. Here's what we saw:

 

Buffleheads

(Cornell's Bufflehead page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Bufflehead/id


wikipedia male Bufflehead photowikipedia male Bufflehead photo

 

Canvasbacks

(Cornell's Canvasback page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Canvasback/id)

 

wikipedia male Canvasback photowikipedia male Canvasback photo

 
Redheads

(Cornell's Redhead duck page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Redhead/id)

 

wikipedia's male Redhead duck photowikipedia's male Redhead duck photo

 

 

Ring-necked duck

(Cornell's Ring-necked duck page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Ring-necked_Duck/id)

 

wiki's Ring-necked duck photowiki's Ring-necked duck photo

 

Common Mergansers

(Cornell's Common Merganser page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Common_merganser/id)

 

wikipedia's female Common Merganser photowikipedia's female Common Merganser photo 

Blue-winged Teals

(Cornell's Blue-winged Teal page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-winged_Teal/id)

 

wiki's male Blue-winged Teal photowiki's male Blue-winged Teal photo 

 

Green-winged Teals

(Cornell's Green-winged Teal page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/id)

 

wiki's male Green-winged Teal photowiki's male Green-winged Teal photo

 

 

 

Cinnamon Teals

(Cornell's Cinnamon Teal page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/cinnamon_teal/id)

 

wiki's male Cinnamon Teal photowiki's male Cinnamon Teal photo

 

Northern Pintail

(Cornell's Northern PIntail page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Pintail/id)

 

wikis male northern pintail photowikis male northern pintail photo

 

Northern Shovelers

(Cornell's Northern Shoveler page: http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Northern_Shoveler/id) 

 

wikis male Northern Shoveler photowikis male Northern Shoveler photo

 

 

 

Also spotted were area residents Great Blue Herons, Gulls, Gadwalls, Mallards and Canada geese. The Common Mergansers are also year-round residents, the rest are either here to breed or are passing through to their breeding grounds.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving