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Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 21 of 44 (554 Views)

@Epster   This is so handy, now that I know how to use it...

That was tragic about the teal.  Many years ago, a pheasant fly into the picture window of my house. It was another event of the bird breaking it's neck.  My husband cleaned the pheasant during half-time of the football game we'd been watching and showed me that the impact has even caused a couple of ribs to break. Frankly, when that bird hit, it sounded like an explosion.  When the hawk, hit my window, I was so relieved when I picked him up that he was just knocked out. I tried calling the raptor center, the DNR, and finally the sheriffs office to see what I should do with him. I kept him safe from my dogs and cats, let him recover on his own, and let him fly off when he was ready to go.

 

And biking 70 miles...wow. That was quite a ride. I recently sold a bike that was really too big for me. I may just look for one designed for short people, (kids size, maybe). There will be some city wide garage sales coming up this weekend, and the weather looks like it will be nice. 

 

You also have a good tag line on your posts. Very thought provoking.

 

Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 22 of 44 (555 Views)

@retiredtraveler   I'm thinking that you mean that you'd like the Canada Goose removed from the list. Maybe not from existence. They came close to that at one time. Certainly no longer.  I once watched one of the big guys waddle off into the woods by the lake where I lived, followed by my little cat. I was a bit leary;  it was as if the goose was saying "come kitty, kitty," as he lead her into the woods .  That goose probably outweighed my little cat by 15 lbs.  

 

Oh, and I love the quote you have on the bottom of your posts... That can be applied to so many other things besides travel....

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,004
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 23 of 44 (549 Views)

"...I taught 4 sessions on the Endangered Species Act. A few days ago it was 5 sessions on various aspects of life zones. Weeee! Smiley Happy ...
".

 

I sure hope you're lobbying for eliminating Canada goose. It's one species that gives me pause for supporting Endangered Species. They are everywhere in the midwest, fouling everything. We could feed the world with these things. They're awful


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

[ Edited ]
Message 24 of 44 (553 Views)

@JoyaDe  Here's how you do an @ reply: type @; you'll get a drop down menu of all the people in the conversation, and you can click choose the one(s) you want to include. The cool thing about that is that they will receive an email notification that they have been mentioned in a thread. 

 

Yeah, the outhouse isn't one of the things I tend to envison when yearning for the simplicity of yesteryear. Smiley Happy

 

Sounds like you had a terrific and informative rural childhood. Rah!

 

It took me so long to reply because yesterday held an ugly birding surprise, and I was a bit shook (not to mention tired from cycling 70 miles). As we were riding on the bike trail, a pair of blue winged teals flew overhead. He cleared the powerlines. She did not. To my horror she fell onto the trail right in front of me, neck broken.  We contacted friends in the park service in case they might be able to use a stuffed female teal for display, but that was the best we could do for her, as she was dead on contact. The mate, which was flying far ahead of her, circled back a few minutes after we moved her body off the trail. Nature is life: concurrently cruel and beautiful.

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 25 of 44 (525 Views)

To Epster....  I tried a reply to the previous comment, but I don't think it went anywhere. I was on my e-mail page.  So, 

@Epster 

I cannot imagine falling into an outhouse roof. Yikes. And bee stings. Oh they hurt too much.  I remember using an outhouse for the first time and being totally shocked that such a thing actually existed. I was a city kid. My mom married my step dad when I was 6, so I got my first grandparents. They bought a farm house on 80 acres a year or so after the marriage, and I developed a fast and firm love for the country.  I roamed that 80 acres and could spend all day out looking for snakes, finding turtles, watching birds, etc.  That is when I discovered an old outhouse on the property. I didn't have to use one until a visit to another farm, prompted the need. Oh my.

 

 

The Flat Stanley Project is a really cool way for kids to connect, get mail, and learn about parts of the country they may never be able to visit.  I think it's great. It sounds like you will interacting with young people, and you could maybe start them on a Flat Stanley Project.  Or maybe a Travels with Teddy...   If you haven't heard of this, it is a kind of thing where people traveling alone, take along a Teddy Bear, and take photo's in all the neat places they visit with the Teddy Bear instead of themselves in the photo. Since I don't like photo's of myself, this is my preference. 

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 26 of 44 (531 Views)

@JoyaDe Oh gosh yes: we were allowed such freedom as kids. Of course typically we were on acreage, or near a lake, so had large open areas to roam. Rural living: ahhhhhhh. Smiley Happy That said, one time I fell out of a mulberry tree and through the roof of a long-abandoned outhouse. The crash dislodged a hornets nest ... and I ended up looking something like a unicorn. Oddly I don't recall having felt magical. Smiley Happy As a pre-teen I was allowed to roam the forest solo armed only with a flashlight and my ever-present moxie. One of my first memories was of riding a tractor. Apparently I'd wandered into a corn field as it was being planted. The farmer scooped me up and took me home, but not before giving a tour of his farm (and lecturing me kindly about trespassing). I've adored farmers ever since. Heh. Those were the days. Smiley Happy

 

So I guess then, from your location, that we are both blessed to be living near/under migration routes. That makes for some great birding possibilities! According to this map, there are 3 migration routes that converge on our heads. And I'm thinking a couple that do the same for you. Yahoo! But check the activity in the southern tip of Illinois, the south east corner of Missouri and the north east corner of Arkansas! Yep: the Mississippi Flyway is absolutely a bucket list item!

 

 

 

North American Flyways.png

 

 

I wasn't familiar with Flat Stanley (no kid experience other than my as-of-April Environmental Educator shtick), so looked it up. What a fantastic thing!  Now I'm hoping one of the students brings Flat Stanley to the river lab. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 27 of 44 (539 Views)

The place where I lived in New Mexico was pretty much on the Continental Divide. One of my grandsons had a Flat Stanley Project, so I took him to the sign that noted the Continental Divide, took a photo, and sent him the map, and details of what the Divide is all about. People hike the Divide route and make Silver City one of their stops. 

 

Where I am now, is about 9 miles west of the St. Croix River, one of those that flow into the Mississippi and form the boundry between MN and WI further north of the Twin Cities.  I grew up just a few blocks from the Mississippi River and used the area as my playground. Back then, kids had the freedom to take off on their bikes with a sandwich in a bag and the instructions to be home when the street lights come on. Climbing the bluffs, exploring the caves, and wading in the creeks probably wasn't the greatest idea, something that would be totally frowned upon nowadays,  but it was sure fun. 

 

 

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,230
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 28 of 44 (540 Views)

JoyaDe wrote:
This is the type of Pelican I saw landing on the lake in MN when I lived there. I could barely believe my eyes. It mentions the Mississippi flyway. I have been down to an area where the Snow Geese, and the other big birds from the far north land for a rest on their way south each fall. I'll have to look for it on the map, so I can find it again. I'm planning a trip down that way before too long, so may just see some coming north.
https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=da25d277bfbc42d0946f4b6b953a60b8

@JoyaDe Oh, I hope you get to see many pelicans and other migrating birds on your trip!  A flock of white pelicans (the ones that summer here) are nothing short of breathtaking in the sky. The black tipped wings, the size of the bird and the immaculate flight skill cause us to stop and stare nearly every time. 

 

If you look on a map, note Interstate 25 in Colorado. That's sorta kinda the line marking the west from the mid-west. The Colorado plains are big summer migrant breeding grounds. If you are out there (How far east are you? You mention the Mississippi, so I assume quite a bit, thus this may not be germane to your trip. Apologies if that's the case.) be sure to check out ponds, and trees seemingly in the middle of nowhere. Migrant havens, these. 

 

One of these springs or falls we will travel the Mississippi with the birds. We hope. Smiley Wink

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 29 of 44 (541 Views)
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 169
Registered: ‎06-03-2008

Re: Migrating Waterfowl Survey of Local Farm Ponds

Message 30 of 44 (542 Views)
This is the type of Pelican I saw landing on the lake in MN when I lived there. I could barely believe my eyes. It mentions the Mississippi flyway. I have been down to an area where the Snow Geese, and the other big birds from the far north land for a rest on their way south each fall. I'll have to look for it on the map, so I can find it again. I'm planning a trip down that way before too long, so may just see some coming north.
https://www.arcgis.com/home/item.html?id=da25d277bfbc42d0946f4b6b953a60b8