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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Calling citizen scientists: Researchers want you to track nesting birds in your garden

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The Cornell Lab asked me to tell you (no, really): Global Big Day is two weeks out

web site: http://ebird.org/content/ebird/globalbigday/ (for all the links that are broken in my cut and paste job below)

We're almost there! 13 May 2017.  In 14 days, birders from more than 150 countries around the world will go out and see what birds can be found as a global team. It's like the Great Backyard Bird Count, but on one single day, and a bit warmer than most places are in mid-February! 

Not sure how Global Big Day relates to you? Global Big Day is a day for *everyone* who loves birds to make your passion count. Not everyone will find a unique species, and that's absolutely fine! Even if you just have a few minutes on 13 May, there's nobody better than you to put your local birds on the map! If you're still not sure, here are a few more things to get excited about.

 

  1. Submit checklists, get prizes . Okay, every checklist doesn't get a prize, but there are a couple things that you could win! If you enter at least three eligible checklists from 13 May, you'll be in the running for the May eBirder of the Month! The prize: Zeiss binoculars. In addition, every 13 May eligible checklist also gets you in the running to win a free ornithology course.
  2. Go scouting . By scouting, we mean birding with a particular eye and ear towards predicting what you'd find at that place in the future. You can use the eBird Species Maps for some e-scouting, or, even better, go out and check the places you plan on going to on 13 May. Visit a hotspot you've never been to before. Poke around your favorite birding haunts. It all helps.
  3. Fill last year's gaps . You can see the  2016 Global Big Day results here. Use the search box on the right side of the page to enter your county, state/province, or country. The list of species you now see is what was found last year. What's missing? Are there species not on there that you could easily find? In 2017, it's in your hands.

We'll be in touch again soon before the day itself, with a few more tips and tricks to have the best time. In the meantime, enjoy the birds around you, watch people sign up on the Global Big Day Participation Map, and get scouting! May is on our doorstep, and the birds are waiting. 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Calling citizen scientists: Researchers want you to track nesting birds in your garden

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We have a 2.5 acre backyard in the hogbacks, and a number of hard-to-monitor 10' off the ground nesting boxes, so I don't really want to try to monitor it. At least, I don't want to turn in a report that is sorta-kinda close to accurate. Hopefully I'll get to do this in the years ahead, though.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 65
Registered: ‎04-14-2017

Re: Calling citizen scientists: Researchers want you to track nesting birds in your garden

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Are you doing this?
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,027
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Calling citizen scientists: Researchers want you to track nesting birds in your garden

[ Edited ]
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This nesting business is an extraordinary and perilous feat. Parent birds must gather the materials to fashion a nest, build it at just the right spot — sheltered and away from predators — and then incubate the eggs. Once the babies arrive, life is a continual hunt for worms and flying insects to feed the young. Fledglings make the leap in May and June, a particularly fraught time.

 

Rearing chicks can be trying for the gardener, too. Forget about pruning the hedge where the birds are nesting or oiling the wooden bench in the vicinity — the avian parents get anxious and the best thing we can do is give them some space.

 

But if you want to turn your curiosity into something of scientific value, consider NestWatch, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s springtime enlistment of citizen scientists to monitor nesting birds. Volunteers across the United States register to track the progress of nests around their homes. Last year, more than 2,000 registrants tracked 21,000 nests, said Robyn Bailey, the project leader.

 

The monitoring does involve some contact to check the number of eggs laid and how many nestlings survive, but watchers are instructed in how to minimize the disruption.

 

 

Find out how you can get involved! Read the rest at the Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/home/calling-citizen-scientists-researchers-want-you-to-tra...

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving