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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 1 of 14

@ip3285 LOL! On rare occasion, yes. We had a racer try to take up residence in the coop a few years back. The girls were not having it. I think they pestered it to death.

 

I've seen bald eagles flying high along our rocky ridge with a snake in its talons. Seems our birds of prey --we have a resident Great Horned Owl, but to my knowledge no Barn Owls here-- do a good job of keeping the snake population in check. (Lord knows the chickens won't kill one; they just complain bitterly until I either remove the snake or the snake leaves apparently in search of peace and quiet. Smiley Happy)

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 2 of 14
What? No snakes in your chicken coop? Fortunately, we've had very few lately, and most are garden snakes. Lots of ground squirrels who love to steal eggs, rabbits, etc. Skunks all summer (Phew!). Our newly-adopted 4-year old, 93 pound German Shepherd loves to chase small animals (he tried attacking my large goats, too, so we have to keep him away from them and the chickens) has killed many skunks and squirrels in the 6 months since we adopted him. He then gives them to my 10 year old Lab to eat. Gross to watch, and dangerous since we're close to Mexico and rabies are a concern. However, I must say he's keeping the pest population down to a minimum. The coyotes are nocturnal so not a problem and I enjoy hearing them. The local peacocks are staying away this year. No elk or deer around our place.
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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 3 of 14

ip3285 wrote:
When the barn owls vacate for the season (their season, not ours), the mourning doves quickly take over the barn owl box. We have two other bird houses on the same telephone pole, both lower down, and during the Spring there are all sorts of local birds nesting in them. We also have bird houses in many of the trees. Our farm is a designated wildlife habitat, where we promise to provide a safe place for animals (I exclude mountain lions from that) to raise their young. I got many people involved in this when I was president of the local garden club, and one of the neighbors a few acres over also has her 4 acres a designated wildlife habitat (she's also from the garden club). It's fun to call each other when we have different types of birds at the feeders.

@ip3285  Your place sounds like heaven.  Thanks for all you do to help birds and other wildlife. 

 

We get mountain lions here too. Also bears, coyote, elk, deer, foxes, et cetera. I just saw a weasel  --first on this property-- outside the secure chicken yard.(Secure from weasles? We shall see!)

 

And raptors! Boy do they like to hunt our field.

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 4 of 14
When the barn owls vacate for the season (their season, not ours), the mourning doves quickly take over the barn owl box. We have two other bird houses on the same telephone pole, both lower down, and during the Spring there are all sorts of local birds nesting in them. We also have bird houses in many of the trees. Our farm is a designated wildlife habitat, where we promise to provide a safe place for animals (I exclude mountain lions from that) to raise their young. I got many people involved in this when I was president of the local garden club, and one of the neighbors a few acres over also has her 4 acres a designated wildlife habitat (she's also from the garden club). It's fun to call each other when we have different types of birds at the feeders.
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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 5 of 14

ip3285 wrote:

Since the barn owls are here only during our "cooler" months, they lay eggs then, sometime between December and March, if I remember correctly.  When my husband built the barn owl box, he put a sturdy perch outside the door and the owls sit there in the evening - one flies off presumably looking for food, and the other one sits on the perch, maybe guarding the house.  They're noisy and screech a lot at night, but it's a noise we enjoy hearing.  Oh, and the barn owl box is on top of a telephone pole that we bought, so they're w-a-a-y up there.  Nevertheless, the black birds, hawks, and especially the huge crows perch in the trees near the barn owl box.  Sometimes it looks like a scene from  Alfred Hitchock's "The birds". 


@ip3285  That's truly interesting. Here the barn owl boxes tend to be on the north and east sides of buildings because our owl friends find the boxes too hot otherwise. They are year-round residents here (eastern side of the Rockies). I'm wondering if there might be activity in the nesting boxes during winter (say to get out of that not-exactly-inviting 0 degree weather we are bound to get).  I'll have to make a point of checking the nesting box camera feeds. Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 6 of 14

Since the barn owls are here only during our "cooler" months, they lay eggs then, sometime between December and March, if I remember correctly.  When my husband built the barn owl box, he put a sturdy perch outside the door and the owls sit there in the evening - one flies off presumably looking for food, and the other one sits on the perch, maybe guarding the house.  They're noisy and screech a lot at night, but it's a noise we enjoy hearing.  Oh, and the barn owl box is on top of a telephone pole that we bought, so they're w-a-a-y up there.  Nevertheless, the black birds, hawks, and especially the huge crows perch in the trees near the barn owl box.  Sometimes it looks like a scene from  Alfred Hitchock's "The birds". 

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Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 7 of 14

HammH wrote:

This is a good outfit. I was able to attend a rehabbed juvenile bald eagle release up at MacGregor Ranch. Scott was incredible with that bird. He talked quietly to it for a few minutes . She kept looking at him with trusting eyes. Then he set her on the ground and she took off. It was a warm fuzzies moment .


@HammH Is this the video of that release?  Fun that you got to see this live.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 8 of 14

ip3285 wrote:
Thank you for the websites and pictures. I'll check them out. Our barn owls, Christopher and Philomena sit in the doorway of their barn own box every morning and watch us walk down to feed the animals. I wave to them as if they knew what I was waving at. I hope they have babies again this year. It was so interesting watching them learn to fly two years ago.

@ip3285  OMiGosh that is so fun!  What a great way to start the day. Smiley Happy Fingers crossed for babies!  When do barn owls lay eggs in your neck of the woods?

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Social Butterfly

Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 9 of 14
Thank you for the websites and pictures. I'll check them out. Our barn owls, Christopher and Philomena sit in the doorway of their barn own box every morning and watch us walk down to feed the animals. I wave to them as if they knew what I was waving at. I hope they have babies again this year. It was so interesting watching them learn to fly two years ago.
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Gold Conversationalist

Re: Birding: Owl Research

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Message 10 of 14

This is a good outfit. I was able to attend a rehabbed juvenile bald eagle release up at MacGregor Ranch. Scott was incredible with that bird. He talked quietly to it for a few minutes . She kept looking at him with trusting eyes. Then he set her on the ground and she took off. It was a warm fuzzies moment .

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