The House Bill Would Mean a Tax Hike for Millions of Seniors. Learn More

Reply
Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 8,776
Registered: ‎08-18-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 1 of 9 (1,932 Views)

sgm55 wrote:
I'd rather be dead than live at an SNF, unable to care for myself. Why greedily hold onto life if the quality of that life means you exist in constant misery? Also, if you have dementia, why should anyone want you around? You are, decidedly, NOT you! Let go, pass into whatever state of existence or non-existence awaits us all.

  I agree with you and have my health care directive so worded - you got one too?

I also have made plans for any time in my life where I might not be able to care for myself - plans that include me staying in my home.

 

  Letting go and passing are two different things and one does not immediately follow the other.  That is a problem for many - what should be done in the interium?.

 

Even in the states that have assisted suicide laws, you have to be consicious and coherent to make this determination and I don't think they take a health care directive into consideration for this fate (but am not sure).

 

 

 

 

 

Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-10-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

[ Edited ]
Message 2 of 9 (1,934 Views)

ASTRAEA wrote:

 

I believe every facility has an ombudsman; maybe that's the first place to share your concerns.

If you've worked in any sort of medical facility, you also know that not everyone goes into the field for altruistic reasons. If it's "only a job" to workers, they may not be putting their hearts into doing the best job possible .. and even less, if they feel that they're being taken advantage of by the organization/corporation running the place.

I remember when my uncle was in a long term care facility back in the 1960s & 1970s; I was shocked when staff were rough with residents who didn't respond quickly, to what needed to be done (bath, dress, eat). Not enough staff, no electronic monitoring.

**************************************************************************************************************
 
I think MOST people in healthcare are in it for the money.  Sorry.  I've been around too long to think otherwise.  The thing is, it will only get worse.  As illegal invaders in the USA take over more of the healthcare grunt work, not only will the quality of the same go down, but you will not even be able to understand what they're saying to you, and each other, unless your Spanish is muy bueno!
Silver Conversationalist
Posts: 29
Registered: ‎03-10-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 3 of 9 (1,940 Views)
I'd rather be dead than live at an SNF, unable to care for myself. Why greedily hold onto life if the quality of that life means you exist in constant misery? Also, if you have dementia, why should anyone want you around? You are, decidedly, NOT you! Let go, pass into whatever state of existence or non-existence awaits us all.
Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 8,776
Registered: ‎08-18-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 4 of 9 (2,403 Views)
Kaiser Health News 07/10/2014 Putting The HOME In A Nursing Home
http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2014/July/10/nursing-home-neighborhood-Q-and-A.aspx

Various states have or are developing alternatives to nursing home living, at least for as long as possible under various Home and Community Based Care programs . You state may have such a programs. I am a believer in alternatives to nursing homes at least until this type of care is physically necessary.

Highlighted
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,550
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 5 of 9 (2,410 Views)
PattyDiane wrote:

This month marks the 4th anniversary of my hospital stay and 6 weeks in a rehab/nursing home after a lung infection.  The one I was in seemed to be good by most standards.  I saw no patients being abused and the employees seemed to be very caring.  At the same time I hope I NEVER have to return to any kind of facility like that again.  My biggest fear while I was there was that since I live alone, I would not be allowed to return home and I did have to stay an additional 3 weeks than had been planned.

 

Now I was the youngest person there and I had my laptop with me and enough knowledge to check out the drugs I was being given and discovered that some of my symptoms were side effects of some of the medication and I took myself off of them, even though I had to pass competency tests to prove that I was in my right mind, which wasn't all that easy with the meds and the stress.  I also had to sign very frightening forms that said I could possibly die because of this decision.  At that point I would have preferred that.

 

I only had to look around me and wonder how many of these other people were in the same position I was in and had no power to do anything about it.  I don't have an answer to this problem but I think there should be options for everyone.


Everyone does have the power .. but they need to have the legal paperwork in place! Everyone should have an advanced directive (living will) in place & a medical surrogate, for when they have any procedure requiring an anesthetic &/or overnight stay at a hospital or other medical facility! Even if you're only there for observation, testing or exhaustion/dehydration, people need a friend or relative who is their legally recognized advocate & spokesperson .. just in case!

Sometimes it isn't even a matter of safety, but ethics. Many years ago, my Mom was in the hospital for a major procedure, and naturally felt exhausted & like crap the next day. While I was visiting, a doctor came in, just checked her chart, and began asking her general questions. Mom didn't appear to recognize him, so I asked who & what sort of doctor he was, and he replied. I knew Mom had been seeing that type of specialist .. for an unrelated issue, but not him, and he came up with what sounded like a flimsy excuse about why HE was seeing her instead of her regular doctor. Although her own specialist was in the hospital at the time, this other doctor hadn't had him paged, but just came in knowing Mom had had a major procedure, and probably wouldn't question his being there .. and he could bill her for "a visit". I very politely but firmly told him that we'd contact her specialist to make sure he saw her, if he thought it was necessary .. and there was no need for this other doctor to be there!


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 8,746
Registered: ‎07-25-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 6 of 9 (2,417 Views)

This month marks the 4th anniversary of my hospital stay and 6 weeks in a rehab/nursing home after a lung infection.  The one I was in seemed to be good by most standards.  I saw no patients being abused and the employees seemed to be very caring.  At the same time I hope I NEVER have to return to any kind of facility like that again.  My biggest fear while I was there was that since I live alone, I would not be allowed to return home and I did have to stay an additional 3 weeks than had been planned.

 

Now I was the youngest person there and I had my laptop with me and enough knowledge to check out the drugs I was being given and discovered that some of my symptoms were side effects of some of the medication and I took myself off of them, even though I had to pass competency tests to prove that I was in my right mind, which wasn't all that easy with the meds and the stress.  I also had to sign very frightening forms that said I could possibly die because of this decision.  At that point I would have preferred that.

 

I only had to look around me and wonder how many of these other people were in the same position I was in and had no power to do anything about it.  I don't have an answer to this problem but I think there should be options for everyone.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,550
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 7 of 9 (2,423 Views)
wayfaIrer wrote:

I am an RN and like other nurses have worked at a SNF. If you have visited one or lived in one, you may have seen conditions that would make you not want to ever have to go there. I am interested in changing some things about these facilites, but don't really know where to start. I think that the government has tried to keep a check on them. However, I would rather see a positive approach. My idea is to work with facilities to improve them. There already may be an organization that does this, but if there is not, I think there should be. Even people with dementia and those who are difficult to care for deserve some quality of life rather than just quantity of life. If you know of a positive organization that is able to work in this way, or know how to start such an organization, I will be watching for your posts. Thank you.


I believe every facility has an ombudsman; maybe that's the first place to share your concerns.

 

If you've worked in any sort of medical facility, you also know that not everyone goes into the field for altruistic reasons. If it's "only a job" to workers, they may not be putting their hearts into doing the best job possible .. and even less, if they feel that they're being taken advantage of by the organization/corporation running the place.

I remember when my uncle was in a long term care facility back in the 1960s & 1970s; I was shocked when staff were rough with residents who didn't respond quickly, to what needed to be done (bath, dress, eat). Not enough staff, no electronic monitoring.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,098
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: really caring for older people - (like me)

[ Edited ]
Message 8 of 9 (2,454 Views)

I think you know the answer to this --- money. My last, and short, career was as a CNA and part of that tenure was done in a SNF.  I'm sure you full well know how expensive it is to house/feed/care for someone in a facility and there is simply not enough money to do it. I'm in Chicago area and we lost CNA's to Walmart, which paid more. And, you know first hand how the obesity epidemic has made things worse. You need expensive lifts to help staff move people, or you need at least two people to handle a single patient. No time and staff for that and even with lifts, it takes extra time.

   Then, how many people in America can afford a really good SNF --- they exist, for rich folks who can spend in excess of $100,000 a year for better care --- more staff.

    I'm of the opinion we know quite well what is needed if there was money to pay for it. Smaller patient loads (meaning more nurses and CNA's), more therapists, better quality (high tech) beds with better monitors, better 'play' facilities and activities, the whole shebang.

  Who is going to pay for it? 

 

    I know so many stories, especially in inner cities, where there are facilities that hire 'under the table' and use people who would not pass a background check (and therefore, could not be certified) and have patient loads in the dozens. Even in 'better' areas, this goes on.  

 

    I can tell you a first hand story. I worked in an SNF where volunteers came in at lunch time every day to help feed people. We had so many people unable to feed themselves, that many would go hungry. I would work with two people at a time giving one spoonful of food at a time, often two-handed. But many patients (residents) barely got fed. Actually, that happened in the hospital too and I'm sure a number of people reading this post may know someone who was hospitalized, needed to be fed, and would not have been if a family member/friend had not done it. No time, not enough staff. 

 

   Of course, the other side is the ethics with the perpetually unanswerable questions. Does someone who doesn't even know who he/she is have any quality of life? Should we keep people alive, bedridden, unable to feed themselves or even move by themselves to keep bedsores at bay? I've made it very clear to my family to let me go rather than suffer this fate.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Info Seeker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-09-2013

really caring for older people - (like me)

Message 9 of 9 (2,458 Views)

I am an RN and like other nurses have worked at a SNF. If you have visited one or lived in one, you may have seen conditions that would make you not want to ever have to go there. I am interested in changing some things about these facilites, but don't really know where to start. I think that the government has tried to keep a check on them. However, I would rather see a positive approach. My idea is to work with facilities to improve them. There already may be an organization that does this, but if there is not, I think there should be. Even people with dementia and those who are difficult to care for deserve some quality of life rather than just quantity of life. If you know of a positive organization that is able to work in this way, or know how to start such an organization, I will be watching for your posts. Thank you.