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Respected Social Butterfly
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Registered: ‎02-27-2008

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

Message 1 of 8 (923 Views)

ASTRAEA wrote:

Repeat - I am not interested in "competing" in anything; never did. I don't need, nor would I feel comfortable with, people "cheering me on". We're all different & do things our own way; please just accept that.


 

I agree with you.  Lots of people work in high stress competitive jobs and do not want to compete with anyone for anything in their free time.  

 

Not to mention that I hate articles that tell me what I should be doing.  I will read the article and decide if I should be doing it.  In addition, they should all begin with.. before you decide to get off the couch from the last 10 years of inactivity and go on a marathon bike ride, you should consult your doctor and get a health check up.

A friend of my dad's was putting on quite a few pounds for eating drinking and inactivity.  So on impulse, he bought an expensive bike and took off riding one day.  Went for some miles until he about keeled over and realized he could not ride another foot.   He called a cab and left the bike where it sat and that was the end of that.  Funny but not really.

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

[ Edited ]
Message 2 of 8 (1,002 Views)

retiredtraveler wrote:

 

   Some of this, imho, is the walking thing. There have been a great number of articles dealing with how good walking is for you. A great many people have jumped on that. Yes, it has benefits. But heart association says you need 30 minutes a day, a least 4 days a week, where you're at your optimum heart rate, to actually make your heart healthy and keep your vascular system in check. That means, if you're in your 60's, you need your heart rate to be up in the 120 bpm range for a full half hour. Walking won't do it unless you're on a treadmill with the elevation way up and walking fast.     


@retiredtraveler Yes, you see? The AHA agrees with the author of the article my original post quoted: we are all in competition with aging. Without physical exertion time will win the day. He quotes them extensively.

 

You should see me power walk up my daily training hill. That puppy is 5% and I storm up it. I get to the top drenched in sweat and I turn back around and go again. Smiley Happy Not because I seek to be better than anyone else --what is that anyway?-- but because I hope to end this day in better shape than I ended yesterday. Addendum: I timed myself. Today, on wet but not icy roads under snowy skies, (which I thought was slowing me down, but apparently not) I walked 4.5 miles in 58 minutes. 

 

Every serious athlete I know will tell you this: we do not compete with others, instead we compete with ourselves: can we move faster, can we jump higher; can we perform better than we did yesterday. You know the drill. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,094
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

Message 3 of 8 (1,007 Views)

"....I think the author puts it out plainly that without effort (think he used the term exertion) you will not make gains, but aging will. Therefore we are in competition with the aging process....".

 

Agree with Astraea about competition --- DW and I work out 5 days a week with no competition. But that aside, totally agree with you and the article with people needing to push themselves.

   One of my pet peeves is seeing people in general, not just 'seniors', in the gym, not 'exerting' themselves, and wondering why they are not getting anywhere.

 I can hardly talk when I'm doing an aerobics class. I'm soaked with sweat after only the first half hour. Too many people are barely moving while talking to their friend next to them.But we do have a few a number of seniors, in their 70's (so older than I), who can run rings around me. They're pushing in every class.

   Some of this, imho, is the walking thing. There have been a great number of articles dealing with how good walking is for you. A great many people have jumped on that. Yes, it has benefits. But heart association says you need 30 minutes a day, a least 4 days a week, where you're at your optimum heart rate, to actually make your heart healthy and keep your vascular system in check. That means, if you're in your 60's, you need your heart rate to be up in the 120 bpm range for a full half hour. Walking won't do it unless you're on a treadmill with the elevation way up and walking fast.     


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,194
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

[ Edited ]
Message 4 of 8 (1,008 Views)

ASTRAEA wrote:

Repeat - I am not interested in "competing" in anything; never did. I don't need, nor would I feel comfortable with, people "cheering me on". We're all different & do things our own way; please just accept that.


@ASTRAEA Obviously your choice, no question and no problem. I accept the things I cannot change, believe me.

 

This is getting off topic, though, I think, as the point of the article is that you and me and everyone else is already in competition with time (aging). The point of the post is to encourage seniors (even those who do not want to compete in senior games) to take up the challenge of competing against aging in order to improve their health.

 

Smiley Happy

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
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Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

Message 5 of 8 (1,013 Views)

Repeat - I am not interested in "competing" in anything; never did. I don't need, nor would I feel comfortable with, people "cheering me on". We're all different & do things our own way; please just accept that.


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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,194
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

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Message 6 of 8 (1,021 Views)

@ASTRAEA Lance Armstrong aside (his problem is ridiculous, unchecked ego, fueled by greed and selfishness rather than competition or maybe it is the other way around, dunno ... ) I think the underlying point of the article is that we are all in competition. 

 

I think the article asked these questions: Can you better your health today? Can you be a better version of yourself today? How can you improve your fitness today?

 

I think the author puts it out plainly that without effort (think he used the term exertion) you will not make gains, but aging will. Therefore we are in competition with the aging process. 

 

Obviously, we are all gifted differently and we must each decide for ourselves how best to express/experience those differences. Time (aging) is a constant and we are each one responsible for the choices we make regarding our health and wellness. 

 

Consider this an invitation to compete with me at the World Senior Games, I would love to be able to cheer you on there, however that wasn't the point of my posting this. Smiley Happy That said, talk to any serious athlete, senior or not, and they will echo this thought: we are not in competition with others; we are in competition with ourselves.

 

  

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
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Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

Message 7 of 8 (1,029 Views)

EVERYONE isn't motivated by competition; some of us were never motivated by competition, and I think that in this country, competition has resulted in a "winning at all cost" attitude in organized sports. Look at Lance Armstrong!


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Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

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Message 8 of 8 (1,069 Views)

So I was researching specifics about training as a senior athlete, when this headline caught my eye: Why Everyone Over 50 Should be Training for the Senior Games

 

And I thought, 'Really? Everyone?' Hm ... 

 

Here's a snippet of the article written by Phil Campbell, M.S., M.A., ACSM, FACHE as well as Senior Games participant & author of Ready, Set, GO! Synergy Fitness:

 

Competition is a great motivation (at any age). When it comes to training for competition or working out for health, competition is a much more powerful motivation. And I encourage adults of all ages to use competition as a powerful tool to exercise.

 

I'll bet that if you where to count the number of your workouts during the year after making the commitment to compete in the Senior Games versus workouts for health, that the competition motivation would have much higher numbers.

 

Also, there's new biomedical research that now proves why this higher intensity training is so positive.

 

Research discoveries show that we can unleash the most powerful body-fat cutting, muscle-toning, energy-producing substance known in science (naturally) with specific types of exercise. And the workouts necessary in training for many of the Senior Games events will do the job.

 

The American Heart Association recently cited research showing that high-intensity exercise can significantly lower the risk of heart disease. Simply, as exercise intensity goes up, the risk of heart disease goes down.

 

The researchers compared the impact of different levels of exercise intensity. The study subjects (men average age 66) in the high-intensity exercise group produced a 31% risk reduction for heart disease. And this was 14% better than those who performed "less intense" exercise.

 

"The harder one exercises ... the lower the risk of heart disease," said lead researcher Dr. I-Min Lee, associate professor Harvard Medical School.

 

 

Another snippet:

 

Intensity Relative to Age

 

The American Heart Association study also proves another important point concerning fitness training during aging - exercise intensity is relative to one's age and fitness level.

 

In other words, an older individual can reach high-intensity levels with an effort level that might be considered low-intensity for a young athlete.

 

This new study confirms the need for higher intensities, but it also shows that beginners and older adults can reach the more productive levels of exercise intensity with less effort than a triathlete, for example.

 

Newcomers to high-intensity exercise may get great results initially by performing the anaerobic training with power walking, but a fine-tuned triathlete however, may need more work for the same results.

 

When you see an 80 year old participant running a 10-K or working out in the gym, don't think that it's unfortunate that she can't run as fast, or lift as much as her 60 year old counterparts. This just means that it's easier for her to reach higher intensities.

 

If you're over 50, get physician clearance first, select a Senior Games event or two, and get started with a gradual buildup training program.

 

 

So yeah, I think the author made his case. What about you?

 

Read the entire piece: http://readysetgofitness.com/23_SeniorGames.shtml

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving