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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,220
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 1 of 11 (1,225 Views)

Hey @fwarren1  I just posted a run-down of what training fuel adjustments we've made, along with an idea of how extensive (or ridiculous, your choice Smiley Happy) are our cycling training sessions. I posted it here, so as not to keep taking this thread off-topic. http://community.aarp.org/t5/Healthy-Living/How-I-m-Adjusting-my-Training-Fuel-Needs-for-a-Changing-...

 

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,452
Registered: ‎10-15-2013

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 2 of 11 (1,372 Views)

Epster said..."Labeling laws or not, most packaged foods do still contain GMOs. Non-GMOs, last I read, were expected to reach 35% of the market share this year." 

 

I see you tweaked your statement on GMOs a bit but I'm not sure what point you're trying to make. The judicious shopper and home cook can check sources easily enough if they're motivated to do so.  Besides...out of the 100% of "packaged foods" on the shelves, I doubt if I (and other health-conscious shoppers) even get close to 30-35% of what is available and all of that is non-GMO labeled or it stays on the shelf.  By bringing up labeling laws, are you saying the labels do not mean anything?  That they are not accurate or reliable?  Or is this another way of saying that 65-70% is greater than 30-35%...?  It's a confusing statement.

 

This is just one of a number of lifestyle choices people make.  The individuals who don't want to be bothered to check out what they consume have a right to do that and the market will respond.  As an individual, I am not responsible for their choices.

 

Statistics can be misleading and flat statements about market share do not reflect the buying habits of the conscientious consumer.  It doesn't have to be complicated.  For example, meat can be sourced from sellers who do not use animals fed with GMO feed.  

 

There are simple ways to go about this if one takes the time and keeps up with the literature of current practices.

 

For those who are interested, here is a simple guide from Whole Foods for avoiding GMOs in one's diet.  You may not have a Whole Foods store near you but you can put these hints into practice in order to maintain a healthy diet without the addition of GMO foods.

 

 http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/gmo-shopping-tips

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,452
Registered: ‎10-15-2013

Re: What's in your protein powder?

[ Edited ]
Message 3 of 11 (1,443 Views)

Epster wrote:

Well, you are free to have your own opinion. Forgive me, however, I will look elsewhere for advice about my particular training season needs. 

 

 

 


 Hmmm...I believe you are mistaken.  I wasn't offering any advice.  I was merely stating an opinion that was not in agreement with what was previously stated but based upon more recent material than the WebMD archival article you later cited. 

 

There is a place for "sports drinks" in rehydration therapy, especially those used for endurance sports.  They are simply not an absolute replacement for other methods of fluid and electrolyte replacement.  Individuals must make their own choices based upon their own particular physiological needs.  Use of sports drinks and plain water can lead to hyponatremia.  Many people concentrate on KCl replacement and often neglect other electrolytes, ergo...the need for whole fruits, salty snacks and fruit juices in the whole rehydration picture.  Perhaps you misunderstood my post.

 

 

 

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,220
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 4 of 11 (1,460 Views)

I now take us back to the original subject, which was protein powders.

 

I've never used them and am unlikely to ever use them.

 

(Sorry, @fwarren1, for being a part of dragging your thread off-subject.)

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,220
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: What's in your protein powder?

[ Edited ]
Message 5 of 11 (1,467 Views)

Well, you are free to have your own opinion. Forgive me, however, I will look elsewhere for advice about my particular training season needs. We are talking intense athletic endeavors rather than routine workouts.

 

As any athlete --senior or otherwise-- knows, proper nutrition beforehand and after, along with plain water, is great for most workouts and even many races. But a 75-mile cycling training ride at 15-20 MPH (especially at altitude) is another thing altogether. Water alone will not cut it. Last summer, we routinely burned 5,500 calories on our 3X a week training rides. And I was always dripping in sweat. Some of those calories and minerals need to be replaced. While riding I can only eat, say, a quarter of a pb&j or a small handful of nuts an hour. I do, of course carbo load the night before, but generally eat light afterward. (This is why I lost ~2 pounds a week last summer. I don't have that extra weight to lose now: I need to be mindful.)

 

WebMD on electrolytes for serious athletes...

 

"The fact is, a sports drink may be your best choice if you're an intense athlete. A new study shows that athletes can stave off fatigue 37% longer if they drink sports drinks -- the kind with electrolytes and carbohydrates in them. They also run faster, have better motor skills, and are mentally sharper, says the study, which appears in the April issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. "

 

... and a little later in the piece: 

 

"2. Do Consider Sports Drinks During Intense Workouts

When you exercise heavily, you lose water and salts in your sweat. Gatorade was an advance over water because it added a number of electrolytes that were lost in sweat, says Steven Zeisel, MD, PHD, chairman of nutrition at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

 

Today's true sports drinks are still the classic Gatorade -- packed with the electrolytes potassium, magnesium, calcium, and sodium to provide energy during intense workouts -- as well as competitors such as Cytomax, Allsport, and Accelerade.

 

Take a swig of an electrolyte drink, and you make sure your body doesn't overheat. You also give yourself an energy source -- one that only serious athletes need, Zeisel tells WebMD. "The amount of sugar in the sports drinks is relatively small compared to the amount of sugar someone burns in exercise. But clearly, it's better than nothing as a calorie source."

 

Article link: (http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/5-hydration-dos-and-donts#1)

 

There's tons more articles like that on athlete sites, and actually, senior athlete sites.

 

Anyway, I'm pretty convinced I'll end up making my own sports drink in order to avoid GMOs and food coloring. (90-something percent of ALL US sugar is GMO, btw. Also most soy in the US is GMO ... not that soy is in sports drinks, but it is in most packaged foods.) Labeling laws or not, most packaged foods do still contain GMOs. Non-GMOs, last I read, were expected to reach 35% of the market share this year.  

 

GMO addendum: if your food package just says sugar rather than "pure cane sugar", the sugar used is derived from sugar beets. Sugar beets are practically all GMO.

 

 

Edit: I needed to adjust my 2016 ride stats written from memory last night to reflect our records. Accuracy, clarity blah di blah ... Smiley Happy 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,452
Registered: ‎10-15-2013

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 6 of 11 (1,472 Views)
fwarren1 wrote:
I believe in getting my nutrients from natural sources, rather than processed alternatives. There are many foods that you can eat that will provide all the electrolytes you need to power your physical activities. For example, fruits like bananas, fish like salmon and vegetables like kale are a few foods that are very good sources. There are many other foods that you can eat that are rich in vitamins and minerals.

Totally agree with @fwarren1.  I've enjoyed reading his common sense approach to health and the informative way he presents material on health and lifestyle issues...although his contributions are infrequent, they are comprehensive.

 

Most medical experts and credible athletic trainers will tell you that pure water is adequate for replacing fluid lost through sweating and urination and what is called "insensible fluid loss" or that which is lost through other body processes such as respiration.  There is no way for an athlete to calculate either the amounts or the specific electrolyte losses during exercise so most sources recommend whole fruit such as bananas and oranges and not restricting nor withholding salt intake during periods of heavy exercise.

 

I think we've all gotten into the habit of reading food labels in the past 3-4 years.  There is a wealth of information about nutrition available in mainstream as well a popular "niche' magazines, in print and online editions as well.

 

I disagree about GMOs currently being prevalent in our packaged grocery items.  To the contrary, many moms have picked up on this while researching nutrition information to guide them in preparing family meals.  Rejection of GMOs began happening early...I've been discussing it for several years with my cousins and children...we are all vigilant in keeping GMOs out of our edibles/consumables.

 

"Lifestyle" diseases or "non-communicable" diseases have historically been linked to a "Western" diet or "Western" lifestyle.  While the association with higher income, less physical activity, ingestion of processed foods, smoking and use of alcohol, this particular health crisis is spreading globally as Western civilizations have begun to pay more attention to what they consume and adopting the tenets of a healthier lifestyle.

 

Women In Medicine Magazine addressed this in an article late last year:

 

"A 2011 World health Organization status report concluded that almost 80% of deaths from non-communicable disease occur in low- and middle-income countries. The culprit risk factors - tobacco use, unhealthy diet, insufficient physical activity and the harmful use of alcohol - were described as the "pervasive aspects of economic transition, rapid urbanization and 21st-century life". The report estimated that the worldwide number of deaths attributable to non-communicable diseases will increase by 15% between 2010 and 2020, with the greatest increases in Africa and South-East Asia. Most of these deaths will be associated with the four risk factors noted above. Tobacco use, for example, if unchecked will account for 10% of all deaths by 2010."

 

Read the whole article here:  http://www.womeninmedicinemagazine.com/articles-about-public-health/the-prevention-of-lifestyle-dise...

 

Anyone interested in following food trends has witnessed a sea change in articles regarding our attitudes toward food and the newest examples of the latest application of nutritional knowledge...led by foodies much younger than the usual reader of AARP magazine and it's online discussion forums.  Having millenials and younger in my close family circles and children who live in four large "happening" cities across the country has made me super-aware of where things are going.  

 

For more information, I commend this source for a bit of "catching up."  

 

https://www.globalfoodforums.com/food-news-bites/2017-food-trends/

 

 

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,220
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 7 of 11 (1,486 Views)

fwarren1 wrote:
I believe in getting my nutrients from natural sources, rather than processed alternatives. There are many foods that you can eat that will provide all the electrolytes you need to power your physical activities. For example, fruits like bananas, fish like salmon and vegetables like kale are a few foods that are very good sources. There are many other foods that you can eat that are rich in vitamins and minerals.

@fwarren1  I hear that! We do eat unprocessed foods and grow much of our own (besides shop farmers' markets), so we are getting a high octane, lo fat, from-scratch diet.

 

As summer comes on, our training sessions (70 mile rides) will leave us depleted if we do not carry nutrition with us, and as we are racers, stopping to peel and eat a banana doesn't work. So: I'm looking up homemade sports drink recipes (water, orange, lemon, cherry juice, honey, salt). Thing is, homemade is maybe not gonna work when traveling to races, so I was also looking into the latest generation of sports drinks to see which (if any) will work for us. Smiley Wink

 

Bananas and oranges generally work great on race day, though. 

 

Thanks!

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Bronze Conversationalist
Posts: 28
Registered: ‎09-02-2012

Re: What's in your protein powder?

Message 8 of 11 (1,489 Views)
I believe in getting my nutrients from natural sources, rather than processed alternatives. There are many foods that you can eat that will provide all the electrolytes you need to power your physical activities. For example, fruits like bananas, fish like salmon and vegetables like kale are a few foods that are very good sources. There are many other foods that you can eat that are rich in vitamins and minerals.
fwarren
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 4,220
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: What's in your protein powder?

[ Edited ]
Message 9 of 11 (1,511 Views)

If our generation read and understood labels, it seems we wouldn't be awash in lifestyle diseases. To go a bit further: if people read and understood labels, then I suspect GMOS would not be prevalent in our packaged grocery items. But they are. So I say it's a good thing to remind us to read those labels. Thanks!

 

BTW, @fwarren1, DH and I are looking into an electrolyte drink for our summer training (we're competitive cyclists). Do you recommend one brand over another? I'm seriously considering just making my own. What do you think?

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,487
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: What's in your protein powder?

[ Edited ]
Message 10 of 11 (4,104 Views)

Too old to rehash in 2017! Smiley Happy


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