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Conversationalist
Posts: 8
Registered: ‎06-15-2010

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 11 of 24 (1,244 Views)

I've been aware of the pesticide problem for quite a while. The problem with rinsing is that most pesticides are oil based so it won't rinse off during the rain or during watering. By soaking all my fruits and vegetables in water with a pH of 11.5 (an all natural degreaser) it eliminates all the oily pesticide residue. It makes them as pesticide free as organic at half the cost. Plus it makes all of the fruits and vegetables taste amazingly fresh. 

Info Seeker
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-19-2017

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 12 of 24 (1,243 Views)

I have been well of the issue of strawberries for many years.  I eat organic fruit exclusively, but my concern now is the "drift" of pesticides like Monsanto's Roundup that is showing up in organic fields.  The use of drone crop dusters in the near future might help concentrate pesticides just on the fields where they are meant to be sprayed.  However, we should do whatever we can to grow our own, buy organic and/or shop only from trusted growers. 

Info Seeker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎08-01-2011

Re: The dirty dozen

[ Edited ]
Message 13 of 24 (1,241 Views)

 U.S. growers all adhere strict chemical use management (IPM).

Please continue to support your farmers. And please buy local when ever you can.

Info Seeker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎04-09-2016

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 14 of 24 (1,295 Views)

It will change my shopping in that I will be looking for the dirty dozen items in the organic section from now on.

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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,297
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: The dirty dozen

[ Edited ]
Message 15 of 24 (1,149 Views)

wilful wrote:

OK - Here is the List:

 

The Dirty Dozen:

  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Celery
  • Grapes
  • Cherries
  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes
  • Bell Peppers
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  •    And - No - this does not change my 'choice'.  I just give a quick rinse to these.

I use this information thusly: buy organic varieties of everything that makes the annual dirty dozen list. 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Regular Social Butterfly
Posts: 468
Registered: ‎02-22-2011

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 16 of 24 (1,141 Views)

OK - Here is the List:

 

The Dirty Dozen:

  • Strawberries
  • Apples
  • Nectarines
  • Peaches
  • Celery
  • Grapes
  • Cherries
  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes
  • Bell Peppers
  • Cherry Tomatoes
  • Cucumbers
  •    And - No - this does not change my 'choice'.  I just give a quick rinse to these.
Recognized Social Butterfly
Posts: 813
Registered: ‎09-03-2011

Re: The dirty dozen

[ Edited ]
Message 17 of 24 (1,181 Views)

@retiredtraveler 

The 7,500 variety of apples detail came from a friend in an email, I didn’t know that either.

Those supermarket apples do leave a lot to be desired. I’m located here in the Buckeye state and we’ve got lots of orchards around here so I’ve taken note of the apples you’ve suggested and plan to check around to see if I can locate them when apple harvesting season begins. I think I’ve tried a pippin years ago but don’t remember much about them. 

Recognized Social Butterfly
Posts: 813
Registered: ‎09-03-2011

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 18 of 24 (968 Views)

@Epster 

You’re right about a quick rinse being sufficient.  I use a vegetable brush around the stem of an apple or when rinsing stalks of celery gives me peace of mind.

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,006
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 19 of 24 (973 Views)

"...Did you know there are over 7,500 varieties of Apples throughout the World, and it would take you 20 Years to try them all if you had one each day....".

 

Didn't know that there were so many, but learned, long ago, that supermarket apples are crappola. I live in far northern Illinois and a lot of orchards in the area, including southern Wisconsin, grow many old (heirloom) varieties, many hundreds of years old. What a difference!!!  If you get a chance, try an Orange Pippin or Northern Spy..........


“The world is a book. Those who do not travel read only one page.”
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,297
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: The dirty dozen

Message 20 of 24 (965 Views)

ReTiReD51 wrote:

My mom taught us to wash and rinse in water and sometimes scrub with a brush all my fruits and vegetables.  Not only those where I’ll be eating the peel too but even those I have to peel or cut opened. She was always concerned about pesticides and chemicals being sprayed on produce and fruits.

 

Remember the “Alar” scare about apples back in the 80’s. I think that helped to inform more people about the chemicals and pesticides sprayed on their apples and other fruits and vegetables.

 

I asked the produce manager at the supermarket chain we shop at a few years ago if the fruits and vegetables grown south of the border and brought up to the cold northern Midwest states each winter could meet USDA /EPA approval. He said I’d be surprised how strict their standards were in South America. I wasn’t convinced that they met the same criteria as those grown in the states or local farm markets including their organically grown ones but I continue to eat my 5 a day but always wash well.

 

Did you know there are over 7,500 varieties of Apples throughout the World, and it would take you 20 Years to try them all if you had one each day.

http://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2017/fruits-vegetables-most-pesticides-fd.html

 


That's interesting about the apples.

 

About washing produce: I was taught that a quick rinse takes off most pesticides. No need to scrub. Still, I generally buy organic (or use homegrown organic).

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving