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Re: Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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MaVolta wrote:

Interesting. I have Neanderthal DNA (1.5% or about average for most Europeans) and my blood sugar has always leaned to the low side. I often need a little fruit juice in the morning. I'm a slow eater, but I know that I don't chew my food 20 times.


Hmmm, we may be onto something here. I've got about the same percentage of Neanderthal. (I can explain the eating like a wolf part because I was raised by wolves.Smiley Happy)

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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Interesting. I have Neanderthal DNA (1.5% or about average for most Europeans) and my blood sugar has always leaned to the low side. I often need a little fruit juice in the morning. I'm a slow eater, but I know that I don't chew my food 20 times.

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Re: Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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lol

 

I have not had a DNA test done, so can't be sure about the neanderthal part. I have always been a chewer and recently have been working to get and keep my blood sugar down .

 

Maybe count me as a chewer with blood sugar issues

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Re: Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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Fascinating.    My husband has type 2 diabetes.  I don't.   He's recovering from an accident and I've been feeding him.  I have noticed that he chews FOREVER.  I had wondered if it was because of the accident.   But now.....hmmmmm....

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Re: Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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Over-chewing food increases your body's ability to make blood sugar.Over-chewing food increases your body's ability to make blood sugar.

One of my recurring New Year's resolutions has been to learn to eat slowly. This one never gets past March. Now it's off my list for good. Smiley Happy (Yay!)

 

Let's do a super-scientific poll (cough, cough)...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Any other Neanderthals without blood sugar issues in da house? Let us know! Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Neanderthals Don't Have Blood Sugar Issues

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Wait. That headline may or may not be accurate. Here's my evidence: I have Neanderthal DNA, and I've never learned to chew my food 20 times before swallowing. AND: while we both had diabetic mothers and siblings, I eat more carbs than does my hubby, but I do not have a blood sugar issue, while he has had to learn how to keep his A1C below pre-diabetic levels.  

 

Perhaps my headline takes liberties, but this one is the real deal:

 

Chewing Raises Blood Sugar Response to Food

 

9.6chewfoodwell.jpg

 

Chewing rice 30 times before swallowing it raised blood sugar much higher than chewing rice 15 times (European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, published online November 13, 2013).
• Glucose Response was raised from 155 to 184mmol/min/l
• Peak Glycemic Index: 2.4 to 2.8mmol/l, and
• Glycemic Index: 68 to 88.

 

The more you chew your food up, the more quickly the food gets broken down into sugars in your intestines, so your blood sugar rises higher after you eat. Anything that breaks up large particles of food into tiny particles or liquids causes a higher rise in blood sugar. See Why White Flour is Just Like Sugar. Other studies show that the higher blood sugar rises, the more weight you gain, the more likely you are to develop diabetes, and the more likely you are to suffer cell damage and premature death.

 

From here: http://www.drmirkin.com/nutrition/chewing-raises-blood-sugar-response-to-food.html

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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